Skip Navigation

Innovative, sustainable and equitableLeading Genetic Medicine DGM grad students
 

The McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and the Department of Genetic Medicine seek to further the understanding of human heredity and genetic medicine and use that knowledge to treat and prevent disease.

The Department of Genetic Medicine is working to consolidate all relevant teaching, patient care and research in human and medical genetics at Johns Hopkins to provide national and international leadership in genetic medicine. The Department of Genetic Medicine serves as a focal point for interactions between diverse investigators to promote the application of genetic discoveries to human disease and genetics education to the public. It builds upon past strengths and further develops expertise in the areas of genomics, developmental genetics and complex disease genetics. The Department of Genetic Medicine works to catalyze the spread of human genetic perspectives to other related disciplines by collaboration with other departments within Johns Hopkins.

There are more than 300 dedicated employees in the Department of Genetic Medicine, fulfilling the Johns Hopkins tripartite mission of research, teaching and patient care. They include 45 full-time faculty, 15 residents, more than 70 graduate students and 200 staff. 

  • Clinics and Centers

    Learn about our clinical services including newborn screening, diagnostic evaluation, genetic counseling are more.

  • Research

    Our research centers and core facilities are at the frontline of discoveries in genetic medicine.

  • Graduate Education

    Our graduate students, medical students, residents and fellows benefit from a dynamic curriculum, mentorship and educational activities.

  • About Us

    Learn more about the Department of Genetic Medicine

Genetic Testing Resources

  • Johns Hopkins Genomics

    Genomic sequencing/genotyping research services or clinical laboratory testing

  • DNA Diagnostics Lab

    For health care providers requesting clinical grade testing

  • OMIM

    The world's most often used database of human genes and phenotypes

 

Statement from the Department of Genetic Medicine

All too often, when we see injustices, both great and small, we think, that's terrible, but we do nothing. We say nothing. We let other people fight their own battles. We remain silent because silence is easier. Qui tacet consentire videtur is Latin for 'Silence gives consent.' When we say nothing, when we do nothing, we are consenting to these trespasses against us.

―Roxane Gay

Read full statement

back to top button