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Residency Curriculum

Each year of the Johns Hopkins Emergency Medicine Residency Program curriculum offers exciting opportunities.

First Year

The first year of training provides residents with the skills and knowledge they need to become well-rounded physicians. We provide a comprehensive four-week orientation program, focused on emergency medicine core content, basic communication skills, procedural skills and cadaver labs, simulation sessions, shadow shifts and mentored shifts in the emergency department (ED). During this month, while first-year residents spend clinical time in the ED and complete a special lecture/hands-on series intended to orient them to emergency medicine, they also integrate with their classmates into the Johns Hopkins family and the city of Baltimore via social gatherings. After the orientation month, first-year residents receive clinical training in the specialty areas listed below to develop foundational skills in clinical decision-making, patient stabilization and resuscitation. While assuming primary responsibility for patient care, first-year residents receive close supervision and clinical teaching designed to permit them to reach their full potential as physicians.

Rotation schedule:

  • Orientation - four weeks
  • Johns Hopkins Hospital emergency department - 12 weeks
  • Johns Hopkins Bayview emergency department - two weeks
  • Johns Hopkins pediatric emergency department - four weeks
  • Howard County General Hospital pediatric emergency department - four weeks
  • Johns Hopkins coronary care unit (CCU) - four weeks
  • Johns Hopkins medical intensive care unit (MICU) - four weeks
  • Johns Hopkins anesthesia - two weeks
  • Obstetrics/labor and delivery - three weeks
  • Radiology/ECG - two weeks
  • Ophthalmology/ultrasound - two weeks
  • Advanced ultrasound - two weeks
  • Toxicology - two weeks
  • Emergency Medical Services (EMS) - two weeks
  • Vacation - three weeks

Second Year

The second year of training builds on the foundations established during the first year. Residents gain experience in caring for critically ill patients and receive specialized training in the areas listed below. Residents spend eight weeks staffing the Johns Hopkins Bayview critical care bay—often described as the quintessential emergency medicine training ground by residents. Second-year residents also begin to assume responsibility for teaching medical students and learn basic research skills so they can critically evaluate the results of published studies and use this knowledge to inform their clinical practice.

Rotation schedule:

  • Johns Hopkins Hospital emergency department - 22 weeks
  • Johns Hopkins Bayview emergency department - eight weeks
  • Johns Hopkins pediatric intensive care unit - four weeks
  • University of Maryland shock trauma anesthesia - four weeks
  • Pediatric anesthesia - two weeks
  • Orthopaedics - two weeks
  • Johns Hopkins Bayview hand surgery - two weeks
  • Johns Hopkins Bayview burn intensive care unit - two weeks
  • Research - two weeks
  • Vacation - four weeks

Third Year

Third-year residents hone their clinical skills and continue the training needed to become qualified emergency medicine specialists. Residents continue to work in both academic and community settings, assuming greater autonomy in patient care and serving as team leaders in the ED. Each resident develops teaching, supervisory and emergency department management skills. Additional elective time is provided for further pursuit of clinical or research interests, which lays the foundation for the fourth-year FAST experience.

Rotation schedule:

  • Johns Hopkins Hospital emergency department - 26 weeks
  • Johns Hopkins Bayview emergency department - eight weeks
  • Howard County General Hospital emergency department - four weeks
  • Howard County General Hospital pediatric emergency department - two weeks
  • Howard County General Hospital intensive care unit - two weeks
  • Johns Hopkins trauma consult - two weeks
  • Elective - four weeks
  • Vacation - four weeks

Fourth Year (Focused Advanced Specialty Training)

The final year of residency is individualized depending on the interests of the residents and the advice of their Focused Advanced Specialty Training (FAST) adviser(s). Each resident spends 1,080 clinical hours working in our EDs in both primary patient care and supervisory roles. This occurs simultaneously with a longitudinal professional development experience with the resident’s FAST.

The schedule:

  • 1,080 total clinical hours per year
  • Johns Hopkins emergency department - 46 weeks
  • Howard County General Hospital pediatric emergency department - two weeks
  • Vacation - four weeks