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  • Eliseo Guallar Lab

    Research in the Eliseo Guallar Lab focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We have a special interest in the roles played by mercury, arsenic, lead and cadmium in cardiovascular disease development. Our methodological interests include determining threshold effects in epidemiological studies and applying statistical methods to epidemiological problem-solving.

    Principal Investigator

    Eliseo Guallar, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jochen Steppan Lab

    Research in the Jochen Steppan Lab primarily focused on vascular stiffness related to aging. We are currently researching LOXL2 (lysine-oxidase-like-2), which might be intimately involved in the development or progression of vascular stiffness. We aim to better understand LOXL2's role in the vasculature and hope that this work leads to the characterization of a novel therapeutic target. This is important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases in the aging population.
  • Maryam Jahromi Lab

    The Maryam Jahromi Lab researches infectious diseases such as influenza, tuberculosis, endocarditis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, brucellosis, Clostridium difficile and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. We are particularly interested in the impact of the influenza vaccine on systemic inflammation. Recent areas of focus include the relationship between influenza vaccination and cardiovascular outcomes, the emergence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran, and prospects for vaccines and therapies for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    Principal Investigator

    Maryam Keshtkar Jahromi, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Nauder Faraday Lab

    The Nauder Faraday Lab investigates topics within perioperative genetic and molecular medicine. We explore thrombotic, bleeding and infectious surgical complications. Our goal is to uncover the molecular determinants of outcome in surgical patients, which will enable surgeons to better personalize a patient’s care in the perioperative period. Our team is funded by the National Institutes of Health to research platelet phenotypes, the pharmacogenomics of antiplatelet agents for preventing cardiovascular disease, and the genotypic determinants of aspirin response in high-risk families.
  • Cheryl Dennison Himmelfarb Lab

    Research in the Cheryl Dennison Lab aims to improve cardiovascular care for high-risk groups through multidisciplinary and health information technology-based methods. Our studies focus on reducing system and provider obstacles to implementing cardiovascular guidelines in various health care environments. Additional research interests include chronic illness management, quality of care, interdisciplinary teamwork and provider behavior.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Cheryl R. Dennison, Ph.D.

  • The Halushka Lab

    The Halushka laboratory is interested in the overarching question of expression localization in tissues. To address this, the laboratory has set out upon several avenues of discovery in the areas of microRNA expression, proteomics and tissue gene expression. Many of these queries relate to the cardiovascular field as Dr. Halushka is a cardiovascular pathologist. Come learn about the science being done in the laboratory.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Marc Kenneth Halushka

    Department

    Pathology

  • Sherita Golden Lab

    Research in the Sherita Golden Lab focuses on identifying endocrine risk factors associated with the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We conduct our research by incorporating measures of hormonal function into the design of clinical trials of cardiovascular risk modification, observational studies of incident cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and studies evaluating diabetic complications.

    Principal Investigator

    Sherita Hill Golden, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • The Arking Lab

    The Arking Lab studies the genomics of complex human disease, with the primary goal of identifying and characterizing genetics variants that modify risk for human disease. The group has pioneered the use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which allow for an unbiased screen of virtually all common genetic variants in the genome. The lab is currently developing improved GWAS methodology, as well as exploring the integration of additional genome level data (RNA expression, DNA methylation, protein expression) to improve the power to identify specific genetic influences of disease. The Arking Lab is actively involved in researching: • autism, a childhood neuropsychiatric disorder • cardiovascular genomics, with a focus on electrophysiology and sudden cardiac death (SCD) • electrophysiology is the study of the flow of ions in biological tissues Dan E. Arking, PhD, is an associate professor at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University.

    Principal Investigator

    Dan Eytan Arking, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Rita Kalyani Lab

    Research in the Rita Kalyani Lab examines the decreased physical functioning observed in patients with diabetes as they age. Through several ongoing epidemiological cohorts, we are investigating the association of high blood glucose and high insulin levels with accelerated muscle loss, and possible contributions to the physical disability observed in diabetes. We are currently involved in clinical studies that aim to understand the underlying mechanisms for these associations and to facilitate the development of novel strategies to prevent muscle loss and disability in people with diabetes.

    Principal Investigator

    Rita Rastogi Kalyani, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Michael Klag Lab

    The Michael Klag Lab focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of kidney disease, cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Our research determined that the U.S. was experiencing an epidemic of end-stage kidney disease, pinpointed the incidence of kidney disease and published scholarship on risk factors for kidney disease such as race, diabetes and socioeconomic status. Our Precursors Study has shown that serum cholesterol measured at age 22 years is a predictor for midlife cardiovascular disease, a finding that has influenced policy about cholesterol screening in young adults. We also research health behaviors that lead to hypertension and study how differences in these behaviors affect urban and non-urban populations.

    Principal Investigator

    Michael J. Klag, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine