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  • Obesity Hypertension Clinic: Reversing the Negative Cardiovascular Effects of Weight (ReNEW)

    Hypertension in children is a major cause of disease, including early onset heart disease. Up to 25% of children who are overweight or obese have hypertension (high blood pressure), and children with obesity are at greater risk for having other cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high cholesterol and diabetes. The ReNEW Clinic at The Johns Hopkins University provides an innovative multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of obesity-related hypertension to help prevent and treat cardiovascular disease. This clinic is designed for children with elevated blood pressure (prehypertension and hypertension) and a BMI at or above the 85th percentile. Many children in this clinic are enrolled in a longitudinal registry to help researchers learn how to better care for children with multiple risk factors for heart disease.

    Read more about the ReNEW clinic: Childhood Obesity: A Focus on Hypertension

  • Michael Wolfgang Laboratory

    The Wolfgang Laboratory is interested in understanding the metabolic properties of neurons and glia at a mechanistic level in situ. Some of the most interesting, enigmatic and understudied cells in metabolic biochemistry are those of the nervous system. Defects in these pathways can lead to devastating neurological disease. Conversely, altering the metabolic properties of the nervous system can have surprisingly beneficial effects on the progression of some diseases. However, the mechanisms of these interactions are largely unknown. We use biochemical and molecular genetic techniques to study the molecular mechanisms that the nervous system uses to sense and respond to metabolic cues. We seek to understand the neurometabolic regulation of behavior and physiology in obesity, diabetes and neurological disease. Current areas of study include deconstructing neurometabolic pathways to understand the biochemistry of the nervous system and how these metabolic pathways impact animal behavior and physiology, metabolic heterogeneity and the evolution of metabolic adaptation.

    Principal Investigator

    Michael J. Wolfgang, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Hsin-Chieh Yeh Lab

    Work in the Hsin-Chieh Yeh Lab focuses on clinical trials and cohort studies of diabetes, obesity and behavioral intervention, cancer and hypertension. Recent investigations have focused on novel risk factors and complications related to obesity and type 2 diabetes, particularly lung function, smoking and cancer. We recently co-led a randomized clinical trial of tailored dietary advice for consumption of dietary supplements to lower blood pressure and improve cardiovascular disease risk factors in hypertensive urban African Americans.

    Principal Investigator

    Jessica Yeh, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Philip Smith Lab

    Work in the Philip Smith Lab explores several key topics within the field of sleep medicine. We investigate the role of obesity and neural control in sleep-disordered breathing as well as the impact of metabolic function on sleep apnea. We also research the ways in which HIV and its treatments impact a patient’s sleep. Our studies have included the effects of HIV and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on both sleep and daytime function as well as the relationship between systemic inflammation and sleep apnea in men with HIV.

    Principal Investigator

    Philip Smith, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • The Hamad Lab

    Our research interest is crystalized into three main areas: 1. Type-1 diabetes - Our focus is on understanding how the Fas death pathway regulates the disease and how extracted information can be used to protect high risk individuals and those with new-onset disease. 2. Type 2 diabetes and Obesity - Our lab is studying the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) in regulating body fat and glucose clearance. 3. Double negative ??T cells - Our studies suggest a critical role for these cells in protecting kidneys from Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Our current focus is understanding their origin and physiological functions.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Abdel-Rahim A. Hamad, Ph.D., M.V.Sc.

    Department

    Pathology

  • The Barouch Lab

    The Barouch Lab is focused on defining the peripheral cardiovascular effects of the adipocytokine leptin, which is a key to the understanding of obesity-related cardiovascular disease. Interestingly, many of the hormonal abnormalities seen in obesity are mimicked in heart failure. The research program will enhance the understanding of metabolic signaling in the heart, including the effects of leptin, exercise, sex hormones, and downstream signaling pathways on metabolism and cardiovascular function. The lab also is working to determine the precise role of the “metabolic” beta-3 adrenergic receptor (ß3AR) in the heart and define the extent of its protective effect in obesity and in heart failure, including its role in maintaining nitric oxide synthase (NOS) coupling. Ultimately, this work will enable the exploration of a possible therapeutic role of ß3AR agonists and re-coupling of NOS in preventing adverse ventricular remodeling in obesity and in heart failure. Lili Barouch, MD, is an associate professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology and a member of the Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation group at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    Principal Investigator

    Lili Ayala Barouch, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Nisa Maruthur Lab

    The Nisa Maruthur Lab studies primary care; individualized medicine for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity; pharmacogenomics of type 2 diabetes; and comparative effectiveness.

    Principal Investigator

    Nisa Marisa Maruthur, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Frederick Anokye-Danso Lab

    The Frederick Anokye-Danso Lab investigates the biological pathways at work in the separation of human pluripotent stem cells into adipocytes and pancreatic beta cells. We focus in particular on determinant factors of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, such as the P72R polymorphism of p53. We also conduct research on the reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells using miRNAs.

    Principal Investigator

    Frederick Anokye-Danso, Ph.D., M.Sc.

    Department

    Medicine

  • J. Hunter Young Lab

    Research in the J. Hunter Young Lab focuses on the genetic epidemiology and physiology of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, especially hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Current activities include an observational study of hypertension among African Americans; a genetic epidemiology study of worldwide cardiovascular disease susceptibility patterns; and several population-based observational studies of cardiovascular and renal disease. A recent focus group study found that changes in housing and city policies might lead to improved environmental health conditions for public housing residents.

    Principal Investigator

    Jeffery Hunter Young, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kimberly Gudzune Lab

    Research in the Kimberly Gudzune Lab examines how obesity affects patient-provider relationships and how physical and social environments impact body weight. We recently conducted a cohort study of married couples and found that having a spouse who become obese nearly doubles one's risk of becoming obese.

    Principal Investigator

    Kimberly Anne Gudzune, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine