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  • Ken Hui Lab

    The Hui lab performs basic, translational and clinical research on genetics and genomics of neurogastroenterological disorders.

    Principal Investigator

    Ken Yon Hui, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Li Gao Lab

    The Li Gao Lab researches functional genomics, molecular genetics and epigenetics of complex cardiopulmonary and allergic diseases, with a focus on translational research applying fundamental genetic insight into the clinical setting. Current research includes implementation of high-throughput technologies in the fields of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), massively parallel sequencing, gene expression analysis, epigenetic mapping and integrative genomics in ongoing research of complex lung diseases and allergic diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis (AD), pulmonary arterial hypertension, COPD, sepsis and acute lung injury/ARDS; and epigenetic contributions to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with systemic sclerosis.

    Principal Investigator

    Li Gao, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Liliana Florea Lab

    Research in the Liliana Florea Lab applies computational techniques toward modeling and problem solving in biology and genetic medicine. We work to develop computational methods for analyzing large-scale sequencing data to help characterize molecular mechanisms of diseases. The specific application areas of our research include genome analysis and comparison, cDNA-to-genome alignment, gene and alternative splicing annotation, RNA editing, microbial comparative genomics, miRNA genomics and computational vaccine design. Our most recent studies seek to achieve accurate and efficient RNA-seq correction and explore the role of HCV viral miRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Principal Investigator

    Liliana D. Florea, Ph.D., M.Sc.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Tamara O'Connor Lab

    The O'Connor Lab studies the molecular basis of infectious disease using Legionella pneumophila pathogenesis as a model system. We are looking at the network of molecular interactions acting at the host-pathogen interface. Specifically, we use L. pneumophila pathogenesis to examine the numerous mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen can establish infection, how it exploits host cell machinery to accomplish this, and how individual proteins and their component pathways coordinately contribute to disease. We are also studying the role of environmental hosts in the evolution of human pathogens. Using genetics and functional genomics, we compare and contrast the repertoires of virulence proteins required for growth in a broad assortment of hosts, how the network of molecular interactions differs between hosts, and the mechanisms by which L. pneumophila copes with this variation.

    Principal Investigator

    Tamara J. O'Connor, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Phenotyping and Pathology Core

    The Phenotyping Core promotes functional genomics and other preclinical translational science at Johns Hopkins. We assist and collaborate in the characterization and use of genetically and phenotypically relevant animal models of disease and gene function.
  • Nisa Maruthur Lab

    The Nisa Maruthur Lab studies primary care; individualized medicine for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity; pharmacogenomics of type 2 diabetes; and comparative effectiveness.

    Principal Investigator

    Nisa Marisa Maruthur, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Andrew Feinberg Laboratory

    The Feinberg Laboratory studies the epigenetic basis of normal development and disease, including cancer, aging and neuropsychiatric illness. Early work from our group involved the discovery of altered DNA methylation in cancer as well as common epigenetic (methylation and imprinting) variants in the population that may be responsible for a significant population-attributable risk of cancer. Over the last few years, we have pioneered the field of epigenomics (i.e., epigenetics at a genome-scale level), founding the first NIH-supported NIH epigenome center in the country and developing many novel tools for molecular and statistical analysis. Current research examines the mechanisms of epigenetic modification, the epigenetic basis of cancer, the invention of new molecular, statistical, and epidemiological tools for genome-scale epigenetics and the epigenetic basis of neuropsychiatric disease, including schizophrenia and autism.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Andrew Paul Feinberg, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Alan Scott Lab

    Research in the Alan Scott Lab involves several important areas of genomics. Our team collaborates on a study to investigate the exon and genome sequence variants that determine phenotype, with a specific focus on the genetic bases of cleft lip and palate. We are also involved in assessing and improving genomic technologies to provide next-generation sequencing and analysis of sequence data to the clinical environment. In addition, we have a longstanding interest in the problem of gene annotation and the evolutionary genomics of vertebrates, especially endangered species.

    Principal Investigator

    Alan F. Scott, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Nauder Faraday Lab

    The Nauder Faraday Lab investigates topics within perioperative genetic and molecular medicine. We explore thrombotic, bleeding and infectious surgical complications. Our goal is to uncover the molecular determinants of outcome in surgical patients, which will enable surgeons to better personalize a patient’s care in the perioperative period. Our team is funded by the National Institutes of Health to research platelet phenotypes, the pharmacogenomics of antiplatelet agents for preventing cardiovascular disease, and the genotypic determinants of aspirin response in high-risk families.
  • Zhaozhu Qiu Laboratory

    Ion channels are pore-forming membrane proteins gating the flow of ions across the cell membrane. Among their many functions, ion channels regulate cell volume, control epithelial fluid secretion, and generate the electrical impulses in our brain. The Qiu Lab employs a multi-disciplinary approach including high-throughput functional genomics, electrophysiology, biochemistry, and mouse genetics to discover novel ion channels and to elucidate their role in health and disease.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Zhaozhu Qiu, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

    Physiology