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Orthopaedic Physical Therapy Residency

This residency program designed in collaboration with The George Washington University prepares residents to apply for the orthopaedic specialty certification and positions them for advancement along the clinical ladder. We also collaborate with the University of Southern California (in Baltimore) to provide four 4-day orthopedic seminars that include up to 85 percent hands-on training.The seminars cover both spine and extremity evaluation and treatment with the majority of the lab sessions focusing on manual therapy interventions.  

Duration: 13 months
Accreditation: ABPTRFE Accredited
View ABPTRFE program profile
Apply through RF-PTCAS 
Application deadline: January 24, 2020
Interview decision: January 31, 2020
Interview: February 21, 2020
Program start: July 6, 2020
Clinic locations: Green Spring Station in Lutherville, Charter Drive in Columbia, White Marsh Surgery Center and The George Washington University (non-clinical site; teaching experience)
View program flyer

Please click the pay application link to pay the supplementary application fee. Application will not be processed until the fee is received and application is complete. All fees are non-refundable.

Overall, I know completing this residency is one of the best decisions I've made. In particular, the teaching component and mentors are top notch. They have provided a constant learning environment, which not only encourages me to be the best I can be, but also pushes me to stay on my game 24/7.

- Holli Flippo, class of 2017

Program Features

The residency includes the following units:

  • Intensive classroom and independent study modules
  • Experience treating in an outpatient orthopaedic setting
  • One-on-one clinical mentoring by board-certified orthopaedic specialists
  • Opportunities to serve as an instructor in an entry-level physical therapy program

Curriculum

  • 1,500 hours of independent clinical practice: all residents provide direct patient care as Johns Hopkins employees at least 28 hours/week for 48 weeks.
  • 373 hours of didactic education:
    • 160 hours of classroom/lab instruction in collaboration with the University of Southern California (in Baltimore)
      • 120 hours: 4x4-day didactic weekends
      • 40 hours: weekly lecture/labs throughout the year 
    • 213 hours of independent study.
  • 250 hours as a classroom/teaching assistant at The George Washington University: 3-8 hours/week instructing entry-level physical therapy students in facilitating competencies (variability dependent upon semester, course and academic calendar).
  • 200 hours of 1:1 mentorship: 150 hours supervision while treating patients and 50 hours of academic mentorship.
  • Additional learning opportunities as assigned: Grand Rounds, physician shadowing, journal club and research development program.

Residency Program Coordinator

Terry McGee, physical therapist

Terrence McGee 

PT, DSc, OCS, FAAOMPT

Email

Current Residents | Class of 2020

Megan Kudlac, photo coming soon

Heather Baeta, PT, DPT

Undergraduate school: University of Florida, B.S. in applied physiology and kinesiology with specialization in exercise physiology
Graduate school: Emory University, doctorate in physical therapy
Professional interests: orthopaedics, manual therapy, adolescent sports
Why I chose Johns Hopkins: I completed a clinical rotation and administrative internship at Johns Hopkins as a student, and the staff was extremely supportive and encouraging to my learning process. I felt like Johns Hopkins would be the best place to receive continued mentorship in orthopedics. I also wanted to further develop my teaching skills, which is a unique opportunity offered in conjunction with George Washington University.
What I like about Baltimore: I like participating in the intramural sports leagues and going to the First Thursday Festival — a free summer concert on the first Thursday of every month! I also like how close I am to different hiking and running trails.

Megan Kudlac, photo coming soon

Emily Jurschak, PT, DPT

Undergraduate school: College of the Holy Cross, B.S. in psychology
Graduate school: Columbia University, doctorate in physical therapy
Professional interests: orthopaedics, sports performance, spine, ankle, shoulder
Why I chose Johns Hopkins: The residency program is truly committed to developing its residents as thoughtful, reflective and effective clinicians with the aid of its passionate and dedicated mentors. Johns Hopkins nurtures professional and personal growth through mentorship, research and teaching opportunities. Its teaching opportunities at George Washington University are truly unique and a great opportunity to explore different realms of the physical therapy world.
What I like about Baltimore: The food, the Inner Harbor and the accents.

Megan Kudlac, photo coming soon

Megan Kudlac, PT, DPT

Undergraduate school: Walsh University, B.S. in biology
Graduate school: Walsh University, doctorate in physical therapy
Professional interests: orthopaedics, manual therapy, sports performance
Why I chose Johns Hopkins: I chose the Johns Hopkins orthopaedic PT residency because of the vast number of experienced mentors in the residency program, the numerous opportunities available through the Hopkins network and the partnership with George Washington University where I am able to assist with teaching in the musculoskeletal course series.
What I like about Baltimore: My favorite part about being in the Baltimore area is the number and variety of hiking trails!

Program Alumni

Christina Jaimes, physical therapist

Christina Jaimes, PT, DPT | Class of 2019

Undergraduate school: Purdue University; B.S. in fitness management
Graduate school: Duke University; doctorate in physical therapy
Hometown: Cedar Lake, Indiana
Professional interests: orthopedic physical therapy, performing art/musician rehabilitation, sports performance, neurological rehabilitation
Why I chose Johns Hopkins: My clinical experience as a student intern at Johns Hopkins was one of the most enriching learning experiences of my professional career. I felt invested in, and wanted to continue growing with those among the best of the best in physical therapy.
What I like about Baltimore: The history, culinary scene, fine arts, and educational opportunities. (And autumn!)

Eric Mahabir, physical therapist

Eric Mahabir, PT, DPT | Class of 2019

Undergraduate schoolUniversity at Buffalo; B.S. in exercise science
Graduate school: University at Buffalo; doctorate in physical therapy
Hometown:Stony Point, New York
Professional interests: orthopedics, manual therapy, spine, shoulder and knee  
Why I chose Johns HopkinsTo be a part of the best medical institution in the world.
What I like about BaltimoreI like the history, people, food, and inner harbor.

Matt Weber, physical therapist

Matt Weber, PT, DPT | Class of 2019

Undergraduate schoolHanover College; B.S. in Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology
Graduate school: The George Washington University; doctorate in physical therapy
Hometown: Dayton, Ohio
Professional interests: orthopedics, sports, sports performance, tactical athletes, manual therapy
Why I chose Johns HopkinsI chose Johns Hopkins because I believed it would provide the best didactic education and clinical experiences possible throughout my year of residency.
What I like about BaltimoreI like the close proximity to a lot of different hiking trails

Orthopaedic physical therapy residency graduates

Q&A With Program Alumni

See what our 2016-2017 orthopaedic physical therapy residents Heath Crist, Holli Flippo and Andrew Hammond had to say about the program. Read the Q&A.

Also, read the interview with the 2015 program graduate Lindsey Plass.

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