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COVID-19 Update

 
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We Are Here and Ready to Safely Care for You

At Johns Hopkins Medicine, your health and safety are our very highest priorities. We are ready to care for you and your family in our hospitals, surgery centers, and through in-person clinic and online video visits. Learn how we are keeping you safe and protected so that you can get the care you need.

View our in-person and video appointment options.

Message from Our Director

 

How We Make Sure You Are Safe

To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, our doctors and care teams are taking extra precautions to make your visit as safe as possible.

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Testing and Screening


a person wearing a mask

Masks and Protective Equipment


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Cleaning


People standing 6 feet apart

Physical Distancing


Learn more about our COVID-19 safety precautions.

 

How to Schedule Your Appointment

In-Person Visits

If you are an existing patient and had an appointment that was postponed, our offices may contact you to reschedule. You can also call your doctor’s office or send a message via MyChart to discuss your healthcare needs so we can determine the appointment that is most appropriate. If you are a new patient, please call us at 443-997-2663 to schedule an in-person primary or specialty care visit.
Learn more about in-person visits.

Surgeries and Procedures

If you've been already scheduled for a procedure that had to be postponed, we will reach out to reschedule. If this is a new procedure, please contact us at 443-997-2663 to schedule a consultation.
Learn more about preparing for your appointment.

Video Visits (Telemedicine)

Many new and existing Johns Hopkins patients have the option to have a video appointment (telemedicine) with their provider, depending on their healthcare need. If you don't have a device to use for a video visit, you and your provider may decide that a telephone call will meet your needs.
Learn more about video visits.
New Patients*

*New patients have not been previously seen by a provider at the Orthopaedic Surgery Department. **Existing patients have been seen by the department in the past. Existing patients must have a MyChart account to request an appointment online, or may otherwise need to call. You can enroll in MyChart to manage appointments, communicate with your provider, receive test results and request prescription renewals.

 
 
 

Johns Hopkins orthopaedic surgeons are experts in numerous bone and joint conditions affecting children and adults, whether they stem from trauma, age or overuse. From diagnosis through rehabilitation, our team will make sure you are informed about your options and confident in your treatment plan. 

 
 
 

Restoring Quality of Life

From spinal fusion and skeletal reconstruction to knee replacements and cancer surgery, our patients have diverse needs. See how personalized treatment from our experts has had a positive impact on their lives.

 

Adult Complex Scoliosis | Sara's Story

Hand Arthritis | Bill's Story

Skeletal Reconstruction | Owen's Story

 

Featured News and Events

 
IN THE NEWS
 

Will Osseointegration Change the Future of Prosthetics?

Osseointegration is a surgical procedure that involves inserting a metal implant into the bone of a residual limb, which then attaches directly to a prosthesis. The goal of this procedure is to make prosthetic limbs more comfortable and intuitive.
An arm with an osseointegrated implant
Events
 

Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Symposium

The Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Symposium offers clinicians comprehensive hands-on training on ultrasound-guided techniques in the diagnosis and management of most common musculoskeletal conditions.
Graphic of an ultrasound machine
IN THE NEWS
 

‘Swiss Cheese’ Bones Could Be Cause of Unexplained Low Back Pain

Age-related changes to the cartilaginous tissue of the spine could invite painful nerve growth, says Xu Cao, Ph.D. This phenomenon may help explain why the vast majority of low back pain emerges in the absence of injury.
Rendering of ossified vertebral endplate
 
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