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The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center

In This Section      

Cervical Cancer

Screening

Cervical cancer screening is performed using a Pap test, which collects cells from the cervix and vagina and tests them for any abnormalities. A second screening test looks for genetic traces of the human papillomavirus or HPV, a major cause of cervical cancer. Learn about cervical cancer screening recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

To schedule a cervical cancer screening appointment at Johns Hopkins, call the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at 410-997-0580.

Can I protect myself and my children against HPV?

Protect your child (11 to 26 years old) or you (up to age 26 years) against human papillomavirus or HPV, a viral infection, by getting vaccinated. Vaccines against HPV can significantly decrease the risk of cervical cancer, as well as certain head and neck cancers and penile and anal cancers.

Learn more about cervical cancer prevention from the Johns Hopkins Cervical Dysplasia Center.

To schedule an appointment for HPV vaccination for your child or yourself, contact your child’s pediatrician or your primary care provider for vaccination.

Diagnostic Services

Cervical cancer diagnostic services: Following an abnormal cervical cancer screening test, women often have a colposcopy, a procedure that uses a lighted magnifier to look more closely at the vulva, cervix, and vagina, and biopsy of the cervix.

To schedule an appointment for diagnostic services following an abnormal cervical cancer screening test, follow the instructions offered by the Johns Hopkins Cervical Dysplasia Center.