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The Immunobiology Program

Researchers in the Immunobiology program are working to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the human immune system. In a range of projects, scientists are exploring the role of the microbiome in anti-cancer immune responses, working to understand the circuitry in immune cells that allows them to sense pathogens and cancerous cells to mount a response without harming the host, and trying to uncover how a dysregulation of signaling in immune cells can convert the cells into cancers like lymphoma, for example.

Some current research projects are:

  • Studying how target cells are recognized and eliminated by the immune system 
  • Investigating a novel mechanism that exposes cryptic information that can be recognized by the immune system
  • Studying a novel immune surveillance mechanism involved in obesity
  • Analyzing the underlying mechanisms of how the immune system recognizes native versus foreign tissue
  • Exploring the role of the microbiome in anti-cancer immune responses 
  • Using a nanoparticle-based approach to try to change the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment into one where immune system T cells can eliminate cancers
  • Employing an artificial intelligence-inspired algorithm to study T cell diversity, learning how T cells respond to stresses like infections or cancer
  • Studying how Johns Hopkins-designed artificial antigen presenting cells can help stimulate immune responses
  • Working to understand the circuitry in immune cells that allows them to sense pathogens and cancerous cells to mount a response without harming the host
  • Trying to uncover how a dysregulation of signaling in immune cells can convert the cells into cancers like lymphoma, for example
  • Seeking to understand the molecular basis for immunodeficiency associated with the signaling protein CARD11
  • Working to understand the circuitry in immune cells that allows them to sense pathogens and cancerous cells to mount an immune response

Faculty

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