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  • Brain Health Program

    The Brain Health Program is a multidisciplinary team of faculty from the departments of neurology, psychiatry, epidemiology, and radiology lead by Leah Rubin and Jennifer Coughlin. In the hope of revealing new directions for therapies, the group studies molecular biomarkers identified from tissue and brain imaging that are associated with memory problems related to HIV infection, aging, dementia, mental illness and traumatic brain injury. The team seeks to advance policies and practices to optimize brain health in vulnerable populations while destigmatizing these brain disorders. Current and future projects include research on: the roles of the stress response, glucocorticoids, and inflammation in conditions that affect memory and the related factors that make people protected or or vulnerable to memory decline; new mobile apps that use iPads to improve our detection of memory deficits; clinical trials looking at short-term effects of low dose hydrocortisone and randomized to 28 days of treatment; imaging brain injury and repair in NFL players to guide players and the game; and the role of inflammation in memory deterioration in healthy aging, patients with HIV, and other neurodegenerative conditions.
  • Gail Daumit Lab

    Research in the Gail Daumit Lab is devoted to improving overall health and decreasing premature mortality for people with serious mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We have conducted observational studies to determine and convey the burden of physical health problems in this vulnerable population, and are currently leading a randomized trial funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to test a comprehensive cardiovascular risk reduction program in people with serious mental illness.

    Principal Investigator

    Gail Lois Daumit, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • O'Connor Lab

    How do brain dynamics give rise to our sensory experience of the world? The O'Connor lab works to answer this question by taking advantage of the fact that key architectural features of the mammalian brain are similar across species. This allows us to leverage the power of mouse genetics to monitor and manipulate genetically and functionally defined brain circuits during perception. We train mice to perform simple perceptual tasks. By using quantitative behavior, optogenetic and chemical-genetic gain- and loss-of-function perturbations, in vivo two-photon imaging, and electrophysiology, we assemble a description of the relationship between neural circuit function and perception. We work in the mouse tactile system to capitalize on an accessible mammalian circuit with a precise mapping between the sensory periphery and multiple brain areas. Our mission is to reveal the neural circuit foundations of sensory perception; to provide a framework to understand how circuit dysfunction causes mental and behavioral aspects of neuropsychiatric illness; and to help others fulfill creative potential and contribute to human knowledge.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Daniel H. O'Connor, Ph.D., M.A.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Joseph Gallo Lab

    Research in the Joseph Gallo Lab focuses on the form and course of depression in older adults; treatment in primary care settings; the use of mixed methods in health services research; and the epidemiology of psychiatric disorders in the population. Using NIMH Epidemiologic Catchment Area survey data, we have conducted studies using novel statistical modeling (the MIMIC model) to explore how depression presents differently among older adults versus younger people. We are taking part in the long-term follow-up of PROSPECT (Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly – Collaborative Trial) — a randomized study of depression management in primary care practices — and have examined mortality as an outcome in the context of medical comorbidity.
  • The Bigos Lab

    The Bigos Lab focuses on a Precision Medicine approach to the treatment of psychiatric illness. In addition, this lab employs functional neuroimaging and genetics as biomarkers in neuropsychiatric drug development. A recent study used functional MRI to test the neural effects of a drug with the potential to treat cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. Other studies aim to identify patient-specific variables including sex, race, and genetics that impact drug clearance and clinical response to better select and dose antipsychotics and antidepressants.
  • Brain Health Program

    The Johns Hopkins Brain Health Program is a multi-specialty team of experts from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering, and the Bloomberg School of Public Health.