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  • Cardiology Bioengineering Laboratory

    The Cardiology Bioengineering Laboratory, located in the Johns Hopkins Hospital, focuses on the applications of advanced imaging techniques for arrhythmia management. The primary limitation of current fluoroscopy-guided techniques for ablation of cardiac arrhythmia is the inability to visualize soft tissues and 3-dimensional anatomic relationships. Implementation of alternative advanced modalities has the potential to improve complex ablation procedures by guiding catheter placement, visualizing abnormal scar tissue, reducing procedural time devoted to mapping, and eliminating patient and operator exposure to radiation. Active projects include • Physiological differences between isolated hearts in ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity • Successful ablation sites in ischemic ventricular tachycardia in a porcine model and the correlation to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) • MRI-guided radiofrequency ablation of canine atrial fibrillation, and diagnosis and intervention for arrhythmias • Physiological and metabolic effects of interruptions in chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation Henry Halperin, MD, is co-director of the Johns Hopkins Imaging Institute of Excellence and a professor of medicine, radiology and biomedical engineering. Menekhem M. Zviman, PhD is the laboratory manager.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Henry Halperin, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Pediatric Cardiology Core Imaging Laboratory

    The lab’s assets include three MRI systems available for pediatric studies, cardiac imaging processing, cardiovascular imaging and therapeutic ultrasound. A robust echocardiogram program conducts 10,000 transthoracic echocardiograms and 1,300 fetal echocardiograms per year, and maintains a database with 10 years of data.

    Principal Investigator

    Shelby Kutty, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Interventional Cardiology Research Group

    Our group is interested in a broad array of clinical and translational investigations spanning the evaluation of basic pathophysiology in patients undergoing cardiac procedures, development and evaluation of new therapeutic strategies, and improving patient selection and outcomes following interventional procedures. We are comprised of a core group of faculty and dedicated research nurses as well as fellows, residents, and students. Projects range from investigator-initiated single-center observational studies to industry-sponsored multicenter phase 3 randomized controlled trials. We have established a database of all patients who have undergone TAVR at Johns Hopkins, which is providing the basis for several retrospective analyses and will serve as the foundation for future studies of TAVR. We are also engaged in collaborative projects with other groups from the Department of Medicine and other Departments including Cardiac Surgery, Anesthesiology, Radiology, Psychiatry, and Biomedical Engineering. Members of our group are actively involved with the Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design (CBID) in the development of novel minimally-invasive cardiovascular devices.

    Principal Investigator

    Jon Rodney Resar, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Mary Beth Brady Lab

    Research in the Mary Beth Brady Lab focuses primarily on topics within the fields of anesthesiology, imaging and cardiology. Our work has explored transesophageal echocardiography simulation, echocardiography, cardiac and vascular-thoracic anesthesiology, and other areas within critical care medicine. A recent study involved obtaining 3-D images of the heart, which were then used to build computer programs to help cardiac surgeons improve their treatment of heart defects.
  • Foster Lab

    The Foster Lab uses the tools of protein biochemistry and proteomics to tackle fundamental problems in the fields of cardiac preconditioning and heart failure. Protein networks are perturbed in heart disease in a manner that correlates only weakly with changes in mRNA transcripts. Moreover, proteomic techniques afford the systematic assessment of post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of proteins responsible for every aspect of heart function from electrical excitation to contraction and metabolism. Understanding the status of protein networks in the diseased state is, therefore, key to discovering new therapies. D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, and serves as Director of the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., M.Sc.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Shelby Kutty Laboratory

    Shelby Kutty, M.D., Ph.D., is an authority on cardiovascular imaging, including echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of congenital heart disease. His areas of academic interest have focused on myocardial function assessment, therapeutic ultrasound and cardiovascular outcomes. Kutty’s research includes developing new imaging technology applications such as a smartphone application that uses patients’ echocardiographic images to track their progress. His work gives pediatric cardiologists better ways to predict outcomes in their patients and provide the most effective and appropriate treatments.

    Principal Investigator

    Shelby Kutty, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.

    Department

    Medicine

    Pediatrics

    Research Areas

  • Reid Thompson Laboratory

    Reid Thompson’s research interests include evaluation of ventricular function in patients with muscular dystrophy and Barth syndrome, and in patients who have completed chemotherapy. He also studies novel methods of teaching and diagnosing heart disease through cardiac auscultation.

    Principal Investigator

    William R Thompson III, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

    Pediatrics

  • Obesity Hypertension Clinic: Reversing the Negative Cardiovascular Effects of Weight (ReNEW)

    Hypertension in children is a major cause of disease, including early onset heart disease. Up to 25% of children who are overweight or obese have hypertension (high blood pressure), and children with obesity are at greater risk for having other cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high cholesterol and diabetes. The ReNEW Clinic at The Johns Hopkins University provides an innovative multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of obesity-related hypertension to help prevent and treat cardiovascular disease. This clinic is designed for children with elevated blood pressure (prehypertension and hypertension) and a BMI at or above the 85th percentile. Many children in this clinic are enrolled in a longitudinal registry to help researchers learn how to better care for children with multiple risk factors for heart disease.

    Read more about the ReNEW clinic: Childhood Obesity: A Focus on Hypertension

  • Retrovirus Laboratory

    Research in the Retrovirus Laboratory focuses on the molecular virology and pathogenesis of lentivirus infections. In particular, we study the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) to determine the molecular basis for the development of HIV CNS, pulmonary and cardiac disease. Research projects include studies of viral molecular genetics and host cell genes and proteins involved in the pathogenesis of disease. We are also interested in studies of lentivirus replication in macrophages and astrocytes and their role in the development of disease. These studies have led us to identify the viral genes that are important in neurovirulence of SIV and the development of CNS disease including NEF and the TM portion of ENV. The mechanisms of the action of these proteins in the CNS are complex and are under investigation. We have also developed a rapid, consistent SIV/macaque model in which we can test the ability of various antiviral and neuroprotective agents to reduce the severity of CNS and pulmonary disease.
  • Lima Lab

    The Lima Lab’s research is concentrated on the development and application of imaging and technology to address scientific and clinical problems involving the heart and vascular system. Specifically, our research is focused on developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast techniques to investigate microvascular function in patients and experimental animals with myocardial infarction; functional reserve secondary to dobutamine stimulation and myocardial viability assessed by sodium imaging; and cardiac MRI and computed tomography (CT) program development of techniques to characterize atherosclerosis in humans with cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. Current projects include: • The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study • The MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) Study • The Coronary Artery Evaluation using 64-row Multidetector Computed Tomography Angiography (CORE64) Study Joao Lima, MD, is a professor of medicine, radiology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Joao A C Lima, M.D., M.B.A.

    Department

    Medicine