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Mindfulness Tips

Practice mindfulness techniques

Reducing Stress Through Deep Breathing (1 of 3)

Deep breathing is an easy relaxation technique that can be practiced anywhere by anyone. Benefits include improved mental health, lung function, and blood pressure. Watch this video as Drs. Neda Gould and Dana DiRenzo walk you through this useful exercise.

Reduce Stress Through Guided Imagery (2 of 3)

Guided Imagery is a helpful tool for relaxation and can be performed in a seated position or lying down. Benefits of performing guided imagery on a routine basis include stress reduction, lowered blood pressure, and improved pain. Drs. Neda Gould and Dana DiRenzo will demonstrate.

Reduce Stress through Progressive Muscle Relaxation (3 of 3)

Progressive Muscle Relaxation is a deep relaxation technique that can be performed in many different settings. Practicing progressive muscle relaxtion several times per week has been shown to improve stress, anxiety, sleep, and pain. Follow along as Drs. Neda Gould and Dana DiRenzo demonstrate.

 

How to incorporate mindfulness into your day

Bring attention to your senses. Our senses (sight, smell, hearing, taste and touch) always reside in the present moment. Take a few minutes to become aware of what you are sensing in each of these domains. Describe what you are experiencing to yourself in a few words.Take a three-breath break. Pause several times during the day and bring your attention to your breath for three breath cycles. There is no need to change your breathing, simply notice your breath for the next three-breath cycles.

Eat mindfully. See if you can eat one meal or snack each day without doing anything else at the same time. Put down your phone or newspaper. Don’t have a conversation with others if possible. Simply focus on your food using all of your sense. Try putting your fork down in between bites to really savor each bite.

Drop the story. Much of our stress comes from the “story” we create in our minds about how things should be, how they will be in the future, or how they were in the past. See if you can notice when your mind is traveling beyond the “facts” of what is true and is creating this story. See if you can bring yourself back to the facts of just what is true.

Curious to learn more?

The Johns Hopkins Health website provides a wealth of information from Johns Hopkins experts.

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