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In the Media

Coverage of department activities and its faculty in the general media.

2019

September

Magic mushrooms as medicine? Johns Hopkins scientists launch center for psychedelic research. say psychedelics could treat Alzheimer’s, depression and addiction. – Forbes
Roland R. Griffiths, Ph.D., a psychopharmacologist and professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in an interview that the approach could offer “an entirely new paradigm for treating psychiatric disorders.”

Johns Hopkins opens center for psychedelic research - Big Think
Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine recently announced it'd be launching the largest psychedelics research center in the world. Its new Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research was funded by a $17 million donation from a group of private donors. Doctors and researchers at the center hope to learn and examine whether these psychedelic drugs will be able to treat conditions such as depression and opioid addiction.
Also reported by: Ganjapreneur

How to teach future doctors about pain in the midst of the opioid crisis (audio) – NPR
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine students Tony Wang, Jenny Franke, Annie Cho and David Botros, and faculty or pain-management experts Traci Speed, Ryan Graddy, Beth Hogans, Jennifer Haythornthwaite and Shravani Durbhakula are quoted in this article that focuses on “a mandatory, four-day course [on chronic pain] at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore — home to one of the top medical schools in the country."

Johns Hopkins launches research center on psychedelics - The Scientist
Last Wednesday (September 4), Johns Hopkins Medicine announced the launch of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research, which will focus on using psychedelic compounds such as LSD, ketamine, and psilocybin to treat mental health problems.
Also reported by: Washington Post

Vaping is the easiest way to smoke weed — but may be the most harmful - Men's Journal
[E]ven [vaping] cartridges from dispensaries aren’t necessarily safe.... And that’s the real message of this growing epidemic, says Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., who studies behavioral pharmacology of cannabis, nicotine, and tobacco at Johns Hopkins University: These are poorly regulated industries. The standards of quality are different from state to state, and we don’t even know if legalized states have the resources available to them (e.g., manpower and money) to establish and follow regulations.

Johns Hopkins launches center for psychedelic and consciousness research - High Times
One of the United States’ most respected medical institutions has announced that it will be sinking its teeth into the field of psychedelics research. Johns Hopkins University will form the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research, funded by $17 million in donations from private sources. It may well be the largest research facility in the world to focus on the study of psychedelics.
Also reported by: Fierce Biotech, Yahoo (via ABC News), Pharmacy Times, boingboing

John Hopkins opens $17 million psychedelic research center to study the benefits of illegal drugs like magic mushrooms on Alzheimer's disease, anorexia and depression - Daily Mail (U.K.)
A research center will open to study the medical benefits of 'magic mushrooms' and other psychedelic drugs for mental health illnesses and addiction. John Hopkins Medicine announced it is opening the center, which is believed to be the first of its kind in the U.S. and the largest facility in the world. Around $17 million in funding was raised from private donors to start work at the center.
Also reported by: EndpointsU.S. News & World Report, StatViceScience magazine

Tim Ferriss, the man who put his money behind psychedelic medicine - New York Times
The fund-raising for the new [Johns] Hopkins center was largely driven by the author and investor Tim Ferriss, who said in a telephone interview that he had put aside most of his other projects to advance psychedelic medicine.

Johns Hopkins opens new center for psychedelic research - New York Times
On Wednesday, Johns Hopkins Medicine announced the launch of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research, to study compounds like LSD and psilocybin for a range of mental health problems, including anorexia, addiction and depression. The center is the first of its kind in the country, established with $17 million in commitments from wealthy private donors and a foundation.
Also reported by: Baltimore Sun*, CNNABC News, Newsweek,  QuartzFortuneThe Hill, Discover magazine, Marijuana Moment, My Social Good News, Endpoints

Study: Most dementia patients never see specialists - NBC Los Angeles (via City News Service)
Researchers at USC, Johns Hopkins and the University of Washington used Medicare data to track dementia diagnoses of nearly a quarter of a million people over five years. The team found 85% of individuals first diagnosed with dementia were diagnosed by a non-dementia specialist physician, usually a primary care doctor, and an "unspecified dementia" diagnosis was common.

Does marijuana lead to violence? Experts say there’s no clear link – Politifact
[W]ithout being able to legally administer marijuana in a controlled laboratory setting, researchers can’t tell whether its use causes psychosis. "In terms of whether using cannabis causes the development of psychotic disorders, there is no consensus," said Matthew Johnson, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University. "The definitive studies have yet to be run."

I tried 20 trendy anti-anxiety products, and these 8 actually work - Refinery 29
Muse 2: The Next Generation Meditation Headband: The headband connects to an app, which guides you through various meditations. Meanwhile, the sensors on the device are picking up on your brain activity, heart rate, breathing, and body movements, as you go through various techniques.... In general, this kind of mindfulness meditation is good for curbing anxiety. Doing about 30 minutes of meditation daily has been shown to improve symptoms of anxiety and depression, a Johns Hopkins analysis found.

August

Could psychedelic drugs become the new medical marijuana? Inside the potential benefits and high risks of ‘magic mushrooms’ - Deseret News (Salt Lake City)
Researchers are conducting clinical trials of psychedelic therapy at some of the United States’ most prestigious universities, including Johns Hopkins University, Yale University, New York University and the University of California, Los Angeles.

Reminiscence therapy: Bringing memories back to life - U.S. News & World Report
People suffering from dementia tend to withdraw from social engagements, conversations and everyday activities, explains Dr. Esther Oh, an associate professor in the division of geriatric medicine and gerontology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Reminiscence therapy, however, "really draws them out of [their] shell," says Oh, "because they're able to tap into their past and things they're very familiar with."

New concerns emerge about long-term antidepressant use* - Wall Street Journal
[T]here’s a growing concern among health professionals that some people who are taking the drugs long-term shouldn’t be — needlessly subjecting themselves to side effects and potential health risks. “Sometimes a person gets put on a medicine and it simply gets continued because nobody thinks very hard about it,” says James Potash, psychiatrist-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

World-first trial investigating psilocybin psychotherapy for anorexia commencing in US - New Atlas
Scientists from the Johns Hopkins Psychedelic Research Unit are commencing a landmark human clinical trial to explore the effects of psilocybin in persons with chronic anorexia nervosa. The new trial adds to a growing body of evidence finding psychedelic psychotherapy effective for depression, addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Researchers optimistic that clinics will soon be able to offer MDMA therapy to PTSD patients - Good News Network
Back in April, researchers from Johns Hopkins University found that MDMA triggers a neural response called a “critical period” during which the brain is sensitive to learning the reward value of social behaviors. This means that patients can use this critical period to revisit traumatic events in a clinical setting so that they can form positive associations with negative memories.

Teens who use concentrated marijuana more likely to use other drugs (study) - NBC News
While some might conclude that the new findings mean that cannabis use is leading to other drugs, it’s more likely that cannabis use is simply a marker for the teens who are more likely to be drawn to drugs and other risk, said Ryan Vandrey, an associate professor [of] psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University.

In Denver, the spores of a psychedelic mushroom boom have landed - Denver Post
[Psilocybin is] the subject of a popular new book and promising therapeutic research studies at Johns Hopkins University and elsewhere, but the first steps of decriminalization also have prompted worries about regulation and substance-use culture.

Dopamine levels increased through deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease patients - New Atlas
Fascinating new research from scientists at Johns Hopkins University is shedding light on the mystery of how deep brain stimulation improves physical symptoms in Parkinson’s disease patients. The study reveals evidence for the first time suggesting the electrical stimulation technique directly increases dopamine release in the brain.

Half of psychiatry, psychology trial abstracts contain spin (study) – Mdedge
In an interview, Paul S. Nestadt, MD, said the findings were not surprising. “The proportion [56%] of psychiatry and psychology abstracts which [the study authors] found to contain spin is similar to that found in broader studies of all biomedical literature in previous reviews,” said Dr. Nestadt, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

Women's mid-life stress might have long-term effect on memory (study) – HealthDay
"We can't get rid of stressors, but we might adjust the way we respond to stress, and have a real effect on brain function as we age," said study author Cynthia Munro. She's an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.
Also reported by: Newsmax

New millennial patterns of cocaine use may benefit future generations – Inverse
The fact that 18-25s (who are somewhere between millennials and post-millennials, generationally speaking) are trending away from cocaine use is significant, explains Matthew Johnson, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins who studies the behavioral economics of drugs.

Can psychedelics heal the Jewish people? This rabbi is exploring that question. - Jewish News of Northern California
[Rabbi Zac] Kamenetz’s first trip took place in a comfortable room at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore with a couch and various religious symbols — a cross, a small statue of Buddha, etc. — and he was accompanied by a guide, one of the researchers. He put on a sleep mask and headphones outfitted with a playlist of classical music, was given a dose of psilocybin, and off he went.

Is CBD the panacea the adverts claim? - The Ecologist
Dr. Ryan Vandrey, associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins, said: “People are throwing CBD at every condition under the sun at random doses and expecting it to work.” Many people claim there are minimal to no risks to using CBD, but that’s not exactly accurate…. Vandrey commented: “We know that CBD can affect the metabolism of drugs, though the extent to which that happens is still not well understood.”

Is ketamine an opioid? - Pain News Network
“A (Stanford) study done late last year delivered a black eye to ketamine, and as a result of the coverage, there was a wholesale acceptance by both potential patients and physicians that ketamine is an opioid,” says Adam Kaplin, MD, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins. “This is most worrisome if people continue to think this way, particularly in the wake of the opioid epidemic...."

Baltimore methadone clinics examine security needs in wake of recent shooting* - Baltimore Sun
The Johns Hopkins Broadway Center for Addiction, on the hospital’s medical campus in East Baltimore, uses unarmed guards with special training to greet and interact with clients, who may be homeless, suffer mental health conditions or just hungry. The clinic serves lunch so clients can get a healthy meal and feel cared for, said Dr. Kenneth Stoller, the center’s director.

Fentanyl as Ohio's lethal-injection drug? Wait til you hear what opioid crisis watchers say - Cincinnati Enquirer
An opioid researcher and addiction specialist, Dr. Marc Fishman, who is an assistant professor in the psychiatry department at Johns Hopkins University, was appalled at the notion of using the drug as some kind of ultimate punishment. "A physician ought not have an opinion on improved ways of poisoning people," he said.

Is stress the reason women get Alzheimer’s more? – Considerable
A new study from Johns Hopkins shows that continual stress affects the memories of women more than men, which could suggest why more women are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.... “We can’t get rid of stressors, but we might adjust the way we respond to stress, and have a real effect on brain function as we age,” said Cynthia Munro, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Battling the 'Devil in the Third Year': The fight to foster empathy in medical trainees – Medscape
"There are a lot of forces working against empathy," explains Margaret S. Chisolm, MD, professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "Systemic forces are working against understanding patients, in terms of time and other pressures, the way the curriculum is and what's being modeled."

Urinary tract infection or dementia: Which one do I have? - U.S. News & World Report
"With evaluation, the clinician should be able to pick up on the fact that [a person's confused state is] a fairly sudden change that, with treatment, should improve," says Dr. Halima Amjad, an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who sees patients at the Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center.

Can microdosing psychedelic mushrooms curb your anxiety? - Refinery 29
Psychedelic drugs, such as LSD and psilocybin, essentially "change the way that the brain functions," explains Albert Garcia-Romeu, PhD, a faculty member at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he studies the effects of psychedelics in humans, with a focus on psilocybin as an aid in the treatment of addiction.

The search for a way to rely on sleeping pills less* (study) - Wall Street Journal
David Neubauer, an associate psychiatry professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, called the [full-dose medicine/reduced-dose medicine] experiment clever. He also noted the positive effect the [cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia] sessions may have had, as well as meeting with a doctor regularly. “This was a pretty labor-intensive process,” Dr. Neubauer says.

Women get Alzheimer’s way more than men — and stress could help explain why - Popular Science
A new study from Johns Hopkins suggests cumulative stress can have an outsize effect on women’s memories, pointing to a possible reason why women experience dementia and related illnesses at a much higher rate than men.

How electromagnetic stimulation can improve memory - Next Avenue
[M]ore research is needed, but there have been studies showing that strategically applied tDCS [transcranial direct current stimulation] can temporarily improve thinking skills in healthy older adults, says Tracy Vannorsdall, a neuroscientist at John Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. However, “We are still working to determine what brain regions to target to optimize cognition in older adults, how frequently to apply tDCS and what cognitive training activities should accompany the stimulation,” Vannorsdall adds. 

The psychiatric 'wonder drug' that almost no one is using – Vice
“I've had people who were in and out of hospitals 10 times — their parents said they had lost their children — and then after [they were given clozapine], they were not hospitalized again," said Fred Nucifora, a clinician scientist and director of the clozapine clinic at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. "I’ve seen miracles on clozapine."

People are hungry for shroom legalization, and the money to fund it is growing – Vice
There's been a steady stream of movement in the halls of power…. Last year, a team at Johns Hopkins that has been at the forefront of studying the mental-health applications of psilocybin called for it to lose this status, and the Food and Drug Administration also designated it as a "breakthrough therapy" for "treatment-resistant depression."

July

Can psychedelic drugs help solve our mental health crisis? – Spectrum
Experts like Dr. Matthew Johnson, a psychologist at Johns Hopkins University, say [there is a mental health crisis]. Johnson is a principal investigator with Johns Hopkins Psychedelic Research Unit. The group is at the forefront of a renaissance of sorts in the U.S.; their work is helping to resurrect study of the drugs.

Psychedelic medicine is coming. The law isn’t ready - Scientific American
When researchers at Johns Hopkins gave psilocybin to healthy participants with no history of hallucinogen use, nearly eighty percent reported that their experiences "increased their current sense of personal well-being or life satisfaction 'moderately' or 'very much' " — effects that persisted for more than a year.

Why I decided to take antidepressants during my pregnancy — even though I knew the potential risks & side effects - Your Tango
As explained by Dr. Lauren Osbourne of Johns Hopkins University, "About 30 percent of babies whose mothers take [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors] will experience neonatal adaptation syndrome, which can cause increased jitteriness, irritability and respiratory distress (difficulty breathing), among other symptoms.

Could social media’s ‘healthy food’ focus be contributing to a little-known eating disorder? - Washington Post
Angela Guarda, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Hospital, says anorexia patients typically “have a rationalization for why they do what they do.” With orthorexia, that rationalization is clear and more societally accepted: “Those explanations are that they’re vegan, gluten-free, lactose-free or so on,” she says.

Does microdosing magic mushrooms actually work? Experts weigh in – Mic
Matthew Johnson, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University of School of Medicine [says] that the very subtle benefits microdosers claim to enjoy, such as being friendlier and more focused, “are really ripe for a placebo effect.”

Doctors explain whether fancy vitamins can really make you more focused and better at life – Cosmopolitan
Docs actually have been prescribing stimulants, a form of nootropics, since the 1930s to treat depression and fatigue, says Neeraj Gandotra, M.D., an instructor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medicine.... They work by increasing the levels of the neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline in the part of the brain responsible for focus and memory, which improves your concentration, says Dr. Gandotra....  “These types of substances do not actually make people more intelligent.”

From mushrooms to pension reform: Here's what could be on your 2020 ballot - Salem Reporter (Oregon)
It may seem far-fetched, but the ... [pro-psilocybin] campaign comes amid a growing movement of tolerance and support for the medicinal use of psychedelics. This spring, Oakland, Calif., and Denver decriminalized psilocybin.... [R]esearchers at Johns Hopkins [have] found the drug to be a low-risk, high-reward mental health drug....

Age and the presidency: How old is too old? (audio) - WYPR-FM
What happens to our cognitive ability as we get older? Is age a legitimate issue in considering a person’s qualifications to be the U.S. president? [“Midday” host Tom Hall] is joined today by two guests with valuable perspectives on these questions, [including] Dr. Jason Brandt is a neuropsychologist and Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Brandt’s research focuses on cognition and neurological health in the elderly.

Can Alzheimer's be stopped? Five lifestyle behaviors are key, new research suggests - NBC News and numerous affiliates
While the studies are definitely good news, they don’t shed light on whether healthy lifestyle behaviors slow down the pathology that gunks up the brain in people with Alzheimer’s or simply make the brain more resilient to it, said Dr. Jason Brandt, a professor in the departments of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and neurology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Sex may be less satisfying with age, too few women seek help (study) – Medscape
Kate Thomas, PhD, RN, director of clinical services for the Sex and Gender Clinic and instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, said the fact that it was a large study adds some weight to its conclusions. She said the main message for her was that, as providers, "there's work to be done here.

Some schizophrenia brains show abnormal protein buildup similar to Alzheimer’s – PsychCentral
In a new study, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers unveiled new evidence showing that some schizophrenia brains are marked by a buildup of abnormal proteins similar to those found in the brains of people with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s or Huntington’s diseases.

‘Well, that was a weird moment’ and other signs of dementia family members should watch for - Washington Post
Halima Amjad, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said that about 60 percent of people with dementia symptoms go unreported either from not being diagnosed or because of denial or shame.

Keto-like diet may improve cognition in MCI, early Alzheimer's – Medscape
A ketogenic diet may boost cognition in older adults who have early signs of dementia, preliminary research suggests. Investigators at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine … found that when older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) switched their diet to a low-carbohydrate, high-fat ketogenic diet, they experienced modest improvement in memory, as measured by a standardized test.

Keto-like diet may improve cognition in MCI, early Alzheimer's – Medscape
A ketogenic diet may boost cognition in older adults who have early signs of dementia, preliminary research suggests. Investigators at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine … found that when older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) switched their diet to a low-carbohydrate, high-fat ketogenic diet, they experienced modest improvement in memory, as measured by a standardized test.

The psychedelics evangelist: A German financier wants to turn magic mushrooms into modern medicine – Stat
[With a handful of drugs that are considered “classic” psychedelics], “there’s no dose with observable organ damage or neurotoxicity. That’s pretty freakish,” said Matthew Johnson, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University who studies psychedelics. “You’d be hard-pressed to find anything sold over-the-counter that you could say this about — including caffeine and aspirin.”

June

Schizophrenia caused by protein buildup in the brain, new research says - Medical Daily
The [research's] lead author, Frederick Nucifora Jr., an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, said that schizophrenia only results in mental and behavioural changes and surprisingly does not cause neuronal cell death, which actually occurs in Alzheimer's disease. He and his team found similarities in the biological changes and interactions, nonetheless.

Brain study reveals type of schizophrenia similar to neurodegenerative disease - New Atlas
Research from Johns Hopkins Medicine has revealed some cases of schizophrenia can be associated with abnormal protein buildup in the brain similar to that seen in cases of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. It's hoped the discovery will lead to better diagnostic strategies identifying specific types of schizophrenia.

Here's what you need to know about the new "female Viagra" drug – Shape
[M]ental health can play a role.... "A primary symptom of depression is the inability to enjoy things you normally enjoy, like sex," said Jennifer Payne, M.D., director of the Women's Mood Disorders Center at Johns Hopkins. "People with depression also have decreased energy, feel badly about themselves and might view their partners through a negative filter, all of which impacts sex drive."

How a trip on magic mushrooms helped decriminalize psychedelic plants in a California city - Los Angeles Times
In October, the FDA granted “breakthrough therapy” status, meant to speed the development of drugs with strong potential, to a company testing psilocybin in people with treatment-resistant depression. Scientists with Johns Hopkins University recently recommended reclassifying it from a Schedule I drug with no known medical benefit to a Schedule IV drug akin to sleeping pills.

Beyond addiction: Medical therapy for addiction may benefit medical adherence - The Rheumatologist
Although medical treatments for addiction have been proved effective, they are not used often enough, said Kenneth Stoller, MD, during a session at the 2019 ACR State-of-the-Art Clinical Symposium. These treatments bring health benefits that extend beyond addiction, he said. Dr. Stoller, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, said methadone, buprenorphine, naltrexone and other drugs to treat addiction are underused due to long-standing stigmas about drug use….

Recognizing the hidden signs of depression - Medical News Today
Low sex drive: According to Dr. Jennifer Payne, director of the Women's Mood Disorders Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, MD, some health professionals consider changes in sex drive a key indicator for diagnosing episodes of major depression.

First pot, then magic mushrooms? Decriminalization is spreading – Bloomberg
In recent years, researchers at New York University found psilocybin caused a “rapid and sustained” reduction in anxiety and depression in patients with life-threatening cancer. And psychiatrists at Johns Hopkins University discovered mushrooms can help people quit smoking. Another study found the psychedelic can also help with alcohol dependence.

Tau and amyloid deposition in living former NFL players (study) - Neurology Advisor
Neurology Advisor interviewed Jennifer M. Coughlin MD, associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, for additional insights regarding [chronic traumatic encephalopathy] and the results of the Boston University Research CTE Center study.

Could California become the first state to decriminalize magic mushrooms? - Los Angeles Times
In 2018 Johns Hopkins researchers recommended rescheduling psilocybin from Schedule 1 to Schedule 4 (meaning it would go from the group that contains heroin to the group that contains Xanax), but Decriminalize California wants to take things a step further.

Alabama moves to state-ordered castration - The Atlantic
In psychiatry, there are some accepted uses for androgen-blocking medications. As the Johns Hopkins psychiatrist Fred Berlin has noted, in these cases drugs are used for “diminishing the intensity of the eroticized urges that energize unacceptable para-philic behaviors” — in other words, when a person is concerned about acting on urges they know to be wrong or illegal, and so seeks preventive help. Other people seek help when an all-consuming libido becomes a problem in daily life.

Ocasio-Cortez wants to make it easier to study magic mushrooms, other psychedelic drugs - Fox News
In an analysis published last October in an issue of Neuropharmacology, a medical journal focused on neuroscience, researchers from Johns Hopkins University recommended that psilocybin be reclassified for medical use – arguing its benefits in helping treat PTSD, depression and anxiety and helping people stop smoking.

Could “magic mushrooms” follow in the footsteps of cannabis on the road to legalization? - Well + Good
With decriminalization, it’s likely that more people across the country will become curious about psychedelic mushrooms and want to experiment with them, says Albert Garcia-Romeu, PhD, an instructor and researcher at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who specializes in psychedelics. “My concern is that like most drugs, psilocybin can be abused and carries risk...."

Storing a loaded gun at home raised soldiers’ risk of death by suicide, study finds – CNN
[A]ccess to a gun can be the difference between life and death, said Dr. Paul Nestadt, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University who was not involved in the study. “There is a common misconception out there that if you’re suicidal, you’ll just find a way,” he said. “Or that if you don’t die in your first attempt, you’ll die in another. The evidence does not show that happening.”

Oakland becomes second U.S. city to decriminalize ‘magic mushrooms’ – HuffPost
The federal government classifies psilocybin as a Schedule I drug, which means it’s legally considered to have no medical purpose and a high potential for abuse. That classification has impeded research into psilocybin’s medical uses. But some studies in recent years, including one published last year by researchers at Johns Hopkins University, have found that it can help treat anxiety and depression in cancer patients.

Forgiveness and your health: What science says about the benefits – CNN
"To better understand the process of forgiveness, it might be useful to step back and look at the process of holding on to anger," said Neda Gould, a clinical psychologist and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

When are cookies or brownies not 'food?' When they've got marijuana in them, Maryland regulators say* - Baltimore Sun
“There’s absolutely no reason for any medicine to be in a brownie, a cookie or a lollipop,” said Ryan Vandrey, a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professor who has studied the effects of edibles for five years at the schools’ Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit. “From a public health perspective, it makes no sense at all.”

The next battle in the War on Drugs will be fought over psychedelics – Quartz
Psychedelics are fast re-entering the mainstream, with prudent visionaries, scientists, and academics like Rick Doblin, founder of the Multidisciplinary Association of Psychedelic Studies, Michael Pollan, author of How to Change Your Mind, and Johns Hopkins researcher Roland Griffiths, among others, leading the way.

'Good luck with that': FDA aims to make sense of medicinal cannabis* - MedPage Today
Ryan Vandrey, PhD, of Johns Hopkins University, noted that not only are THC [tetrahydrocannabinol] and marijuana extracts designated as Schedule I drugs, so is synthetic CBD [cannabidiol].... Vandrey said that while CBD and THC garner the most attention, researchers should also look into the other 80-plus cannabinoids found in cannabis.

Oakland City Council looks to decriminalize 'magic mushrooms' after Denver vote - USA Today
Last year, researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore published a study in the medical journal Neuropharmacology advising that psilocybin be reclassified from a Schedule 1 drug with no known benefits to a Schedule 4 drug, which would put it in the same category as prescription sleeping pills.

CBD in the spotlight (video) - KVOA-TV (Tucson)
The Food and Drug Administration is seeking clarity on the supplement and took a first step Friday toward regulating CBD, hearing from more than 140 people, including doctors, retailers, trade groups and researchers…. “Right now [CBD supplements] are marketed and they are not tested under FDA approved strategies for safety and efficacy. The public opinion is guiding how we’re treating a number of disorders,” said Elise Weerts of Johns Hopkins University.

Psychedelics, long ignored by scientists, seeing resurgence in medical research - San Francisco Chronicle
“I came across the older era of psychedelic research in the late ’90s, when I was in college. I recognized it as this fascinating scientific history for which these threads were left dangling,” said Matthew Johnson, an associate professor in psychiatry and behaviorial sciences at Johns Hopkins University who has studied using psychedelics to change behavior.

May

A patient's guide to schizophrenia - U.S. News & World Report
“[Schizophrenia] is a construct that was developed early in the 20th century to make sense out of a group of patients that were clearly very ill and did not have what we would now call bipolar disorder – then manic depressive illness,” says Dr. Russell L. Margolis, clinical director of the Johns Hopkins Schizophrenia Center and a professor of psychiatry and neurology at Johns Hopkins University. “And yet, there’s no one precise thing that defines it.”

Broccoli sprout compound may help restore brain chemistry imbalance in schizophrenia – PsychCentral
In a series of recently published studies in humans and animals, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have identified certain glutamate-related chemical imbalances in the brains of schizophrenia patients —  and that these imbalances may potentially be reversed using a compound derived from broccoli sprouts, known as sulforaphane.

Oakland could become second US city to decriminalize ‘magic mushrooms’ - San Francisco Chronicle
Research out of Johns Hopkins University has shown that the drug could help people quit smoking. UCSF scientists are studying psilocybin as a possible treatment for long-term AIDS survivors who are feeling general malaise and demoralization. “The data are really impressive. We should be cautiously but enthusiastically pursuing these threads,” said Matthew Johnson, an associate professor in psychiatry and behavior sciences at Johns Hopkins.

My great-grandmother’s struggle with mental illness — and the therapy that saved her life – Vox
To get a better sense of how [electroconvulsive therapy] is applied, I visited a clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore that treats between 10 and 20 patients a day.... While visiting Johns Hopkins, I spoke to Dr. Irving Reti, the director of the brain stimulation program and a professor of psychiatry. He’s a soft-spoken man with a barely noticeable Australian accent who has treated thousands of patients with ECT.

Bipolar disorder a risk factor for Parkinson's? (study) – HealthDay
"I wasn't surprised [by the study's findings], because similar disorders like major depression and anxiety disorder convey a similar increased risk of Parkinson's later in life," said Dr. Gregory Pontone, director of the Parkinson's disease research center at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. "This gives you two reasons to treat bipolar disorder aggressively," he added.

'Everybody feels free here': Baltimore's nightclub for disabled adults fosters love, friendship and inclusion* - Baltimore Sun
Carol Orth, clinical supervisor for Adult Autism and Developmental Disorders Center at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, said broaching the topic of intimate relationships for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities can be tricky…. “It is a very difficult thing because they are in bodies that, chronically, want to and can be sexual, but do not necessarily have the capacity to understand intimacy,” Orth said. “It is a case-by-case basis.”

Can psychedelic experiences cure alcohol addiction? - Psychology Today
[T]here might be hope on the horizon for chronic sufferers of alcohol use disorder. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University and the Erowid Center explored the effects of psychedelics on heavy alcohol users. Interestingly, they found significant and long-term reductions in alcohol use following psychedelic experiences.

Where Is the grandmother I once knew? When dementia drugs steal patients’ personalities - Being Patient
Paul Rosenberg, M.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, researches depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms in relation to Alzheimer’s disease. He said researchers have been focusing on social interaction as an alternative to drug interventions. However, he thinks funding is limited for researchers who want to focus on lifestyle interventions because drug companies in the U.S. make billions of dollars.

With Denver’s vote on magic mushrooms, will Colorado anchor a psychedelic medicine revolution? - Colorado Sun
Studies measuring psilocybin’s effect on depression — at London’s Imperial College and Johns Hopkins’ Psychedelic Research Unit — show that the mushrooms can reduce symptoms, with the relief from a single treatment lasting more than a month.

The troubled history of psychiatry - New Yorker
Adolf Meyer, a Swiss-born physician who, in 1910, became the first director of the psychiatry clinic at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, advocated an approach he called, variously, “psychobiology” and “common sense” psychiatry — the gathering of data without a guiding dogma.

How the party drug ketamine is helping battle severe depression (video) - NBC 4 (D.C.)
Clinical trials found that ketamine, administered in controlled doses, could help [people] with severe hopeless depression.... "It acts through a different area in the brain than what most typical depressants are acting," said Dr. Erica Richards, the medical director of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Sibley Memorial Hospital and who took part in the clinical trials. She calls the treatment a game changer because ketamine is the first depression drug that can work quickly, within hours.

'A grand experiment': how 'shrooms made Denver America's most drug-friendly city - The Guardian
At its peak, the Initiative 301 campaign had 10 staff members and 50 volunteers canvassing Denver to tell people about the “breakthrough therapy” status psilocybin-assisted treatments had received from the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2018. The designation came after studies from Johns Hopkins, UCLA, New York University and other leading medical institutions that showed psychedelic mushrooms can alleviate treatment-resistant depression without the danger of physical dependency or lethal overdose.

Psychedelics' role in beating alcoholism illustrated in LSD, psilocybin study – Inverse
[A]fter the 50-year research hiatus necessitated by [LSD's] illegal status, scientists are once again finding psychedelics like LSD as well as psilocybin to be useful tools in fighting addiction.... Matthew Johnson, Ph.D., an associate professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, tells Inverse that this work is a “thread that was left dangling” from that earlier era of research.

Why losing ability to smell lemons, onions could herald early death (study) -The Guardian (U.K.)
Vidyulata Kamath, Ph.D., and Dr. Bruce Leff, both from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD, have written an editorial to accompany the study paper. In it, they outline the growing interest in olfaction as a predictor of disease and mortality. They also explain that scientists will need to carry out much more work before this new knowledge can become part of the healthcare system at large.

The mushrooms are slowly taking effect - The Atlantic
[Denver's decriminalization of psilocybin] could also be a bellwether for the nation, and the world, as people begin to reflect on why psychedelic mushrooms are among the most tightly regulated ingestible substances on the planet, even though researchers at Johns Hopkins have recently found that they pose no risk of creating physical dependence and low risk of abuse and harm.

Denver’s successful effort to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms shows how to end the drug war –Medium
Wednesday night, the Centennial State made history ... by becoming the first state to have one of its cities vote to decriminalize the use of psilocybin, more commonly known as “magic mushrooms.” ... In 2018, researchers at Johns Hopkins called for the government to remove the substance from its list of Schedule I drugs.

Everything to know about the fight to decriminalize magic mushrooms - The Cut (New York magazine)
In an October 2018 report published in the journal Neuropharmacology, researchers from Johns Hopkins University suggested that psilocybin be reclassified for medical use, as studies have shown that even just one dose of the compound can help patients who suffer from resistant forms of depression.

Fighting schizophrenia with broccoli (video) - CBS News
There is a new study suggesting broccoli could be the key to fighting schizophrenia, that is according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. They say an extract from the broccoli sprout could adjust a chemical imbalance found in the brain that is associated with schizophrenia. The results show that the extract "may someday provide a way to lower the doses of traditional antipsychotic medicines needed to manage schizophrenia symptoms.
Also reported by: NDTV, Yahoo, Philly Voice

Broccoli may help fight off schizophrenia: study - New York Post
Broccoli, for years hailed as a cancer-fighter and a great source of vitamin C, calcium and B vitamins, is now being seen as a safer way to manage schizophrenia. Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say a compound derived from broccoli sprouts can help adjust the chemical imbalances in the brain that have been linked to schizophrenia.

Could “magic mushrooms” follow in the footsteps of cannabis on the road to legalization? - Well + Good
With decriminalization, it’s likely that more people across the country will become curious about psychedelic mushrooms and want to experiment with them, says Albert Garcia-Romeu, PhD, a research associate at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who specializes in psychedelics. “My concern is that like most drugs, psilocybin can be abused and carries risk….”

Denver voters support ‘magic’ mushrooms - New York Times
Dr. Matthew Johnson, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, was one of the authors of a study last year recommending that the Food and Drug Administration reclassify [psilocybin] to acknowledge its potential medical uses and relatively low potential for abuse. Psilocybin is not addictive, and “there’s no direct lethal overdose” of the drug on record, Dr. Johnson said.

Key to treating schizophrenia may be found in broccoli - Daily Mail
The key to treating schizophrenia may be found in broccoli, [Johns Hopkins] research suggests. Scientists found extracts of the vegetable can tweak chemical imbalances in the brains of people with the condition. They used the compound sulforaphane, derived from broccoli sprouts, to restore lower levels of glutamate and glutathione.
Also reported by: Science Daily, News Medical

Denver approves decriminalizing psilocybin mushrooms in unofficial results, as public support for psychedelic drug research grows – Time
[Preliminary study results suggesting the hallucinogen could be used to treat a number of mental health conditions] are compelling enough, and the rates of abuse low enough, that in 2018, researchers from Johns Hopkins wrote a paper arguing that psilocybin should be reclassified from a schedule I drug to a schedule IV drug, as long as it clears clinical trials in the coming years.

Inside the fight to decriminalize magic mushrooms in Denver - Vice News
"What we've found is for the most part people who tend to be opposed initially, once they hear the research — once they hear that Johns Hopkins University and NYU have been conducting studies on psilocybin for almost 20 years now — they come around," Kevin Matthews, the campaign director for the Decriminalize Denver movement, told VICE News before the vote.

Sleep cures: CBD vs. melatonin - Mercury-News (San Jose, Calif.)
“Even sound sleepers have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep once in a while,” says Luis F. Buenaver, Ph.D., a sleep expert at Johns Hopkins, as the Johns Hopkins website noted. “You may want to try melatonin for sleep if you have difficulty for more than a night or two.”

Standing against psychiatry’s crazes - Catholic Citizens
A professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a tenacious skeptic of the crazes that periodically overtake his specialty, Dr. [Paul] McHugh has often served as psychiatry’s most outspoken critic. Either he’s crazy, or all the other psychiatrists are.
Also reported by: Wall Street Journal*

Denver votes on whether to decriminalize ‘magic mushrooms’ - New York Times
Dr. Matthew Johnson, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, was one of the authors of a study last year recommending that the Food and Drug Administration reclassify the drug [psilocybin] to acknowledge its potential medical uses and relatively low potential for abuse. Psilocybin is not addictive, and “there’s no direct lethal overdose” of the drug on record, Dr. Johnson said.
Related news reported by: NPR, CNN

As legal marijuana booms, Denver votes on decriminalizing hallucinogenic mushrooms - Washington Post
[I]n 2006, researchers at Johns Hopkins University studied 36 people who took high doses of psilocybin and were monitored for the next eight hours as they relaxed a couch and listened to classical music. “67 percent of the volunteers,” the Hopkins study found, “rated the experience with psilocybin to be either the single most meaningful experience of his or her life or among the top five most meaningful experiences of his or her life.

Colorado veteran used magic mushrooms to treat PTSD. Now he wants them decriminalized - 9 News (Denver)
Recent research shows psilocybin, or 'magic mushrooms,' may be effective in treating depression, anxiety and other disorders. A recent Johns Hopkins study monitored 51 terminally ill cancer patients with end-of-life fear after they took psilocybin in a clinical setting. Six months after taking the drug, 80-percent maintained decreased depression.

April

Personal encounters with 'God' confer lasting mental health benefits (study)* – Medscape
"These [encounters] are rated as among the most personally meaningful and spiritually significant lifetime experiences, with moderate to strong persisting positive changes in life satisfaction, purpose, and meaning attributed to these experiences," lead investigator Roland Griffiths, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, told Medscape Medical News.

Proof of God? 'Encounters with the Almighty' leave people healthier - Express (U.K.)
A survey of more than 4,000 people worldwide who claim to have had some experience meeting the “ultimate reality” or God [shows that the people] tend to be healthier, even decades down the line. The research, carried out by Johns Hopkins University, found that an experience in feeling you have met God can lead to positive changes. Also reported by: Crosswalk, PsychCentral, Earth, Medical News Today

Taking mushrooms for depression cured me of my atheism - The Outline
Despite the overwhelming spiritual consensus within my small Texas town, I knew “God” didn’t exist. Nothing shook this conviction until I participated in a clinical trial at Johns Hopkins University last year in which I was given high doses of psilocybin — the psychedelic compound in “magic mushrooms” — to treat major depressive disorder.

A growing movement wants to loosen laws around psilocybin, treat mushrooms as medicine  - KUNC-FM/NPR (Greeley, Colo.)
The notion that state laws around mushrooms could be loosened up, much like they have been for cannabis, is not without controversy. Matthew Johnson has spent the last 15 years researching psychedelics at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and doesn’t believe this type of access is responsible.  “(This therapy) needs to be done by appropriately trained and credentialed medical and psychological professionals,” he said.

One mystical psychedelic trip can trigger lifelong benefits - Psychology Today
[N]ew research by Roland Griffiths and colleagues at Johns Hopkins reaffirms the universal ability of one mystical psychedelic trip or having a profound "God encounter" without drugs to improve life satisfaction and psychological well-being for an indefinite amount of time.

A scientific look at your brain on shrooms - 5280 (Denver's Mile High Magazine)
Possible effects: Researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that a shroom-induced mystical experience can soothe some cancer patients’ anxiety, depression, and fear of death.

Rodricks: Mayor Pugh might need an intervention to make the right decision* - Baltimore Sun
[T]he right people have to be involved [in an intervention]. That means people very close to the subject of the intervention or “people with undeniable authority,” says Annette Hanson, a forensic psychiatrist on the faculty at the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University.

Atheists found "God" or "Ultimate Reality" after taking psychedelic drugs – Inverse
In [a] paper published Tuesday, psychiatry and neuroscience researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine describe the shifts that those people felt following drug-induced and non-drug-induced encounters with “God,” a “Higher Power,” an “Ultimate Reality,” or an “Aspect or Emissary of God” (an angel).
Also reported by: Newsmax, Study Finds, Independent, Free Press Journal

Hearing voices could just be a sign of stress and NOT schizophrenia: Study finds HALF of patients with the symptom may just have anxiety - Daily Mail (U.K.)
The research was carried out by Johns Hopkins University and led by Dr Russell Margolis, clinical director of the university's Schizophrenia Center. Study author Krista Baker, manager of the adult outpatient schizophrenia services at Johns Hopkins Medicine, said: 'Because we’ve shined a spotlight in recent years on emerging and early signs of psychosis, diagnosis of schizophrenia is like a new fad. 'And it’s a problem especially for those who are not schizophrenia specialists because symptoms can be complex and misleading.’

A drug for autism? Potential treatment for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome offers clues - The Conversation
In this first-person commentary, Daniel R. Weinberger, director of the Lieber Institute for Brain Development and Professor, Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, Neuroscience and The Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, says current approaches to help children with autism are of limited impact, but scientists are beginning to imagine that treatments will soon be based on an understanding of specific causes.

A life in recovery: From getting thrown out of Dunkin' Donuts to becoming a lead barista - Burlington Free Press (Vermont)
“Generally, when you look at people who are in regular community workplaces, there is a relationship between staying abstinent and staying employed,” Kenneth Silverman, a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medicine, told Journalist's Resource. “But it’s not clear whether employment causes abstinence, or people who are abstinent are also more likely to get employed.”

Study suggests overdiagnosis of schizophrenia – Eurasia Review
In a small study of patients referred to the Johns Hopkins Early Psychosis Intervention Clinic (EPIC), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that about half the people referred to the clinic with a schizophrenia diagnosis didn’t actually have schizophrenia.

Patients are commonly misdiagnosed with schizophrenia (study) - MD magazine
The study, from the Johns Hopkins Early Psychosis Intervention Clinic (EPIC), reported that a multitude of factors may influence a physician too readily diagnosing a patient with schizophrenia — not the least of which being a desire to treat the chronic psychiatric condition with speed and efficacy.

What's driving the rise in teen depression? – U.S. News & World Report
As an article in Johns Hopkins Health Review explains, adolescent depression is a relatively new diagnosis. Until the 1980s, mental health professionals were reluctant to diagnose youth with a mood disorder in part because the adolescent brain is still developing and they thought it would not be appropriate to diagnose someone so young with depression.

Under the depression helmet - The Atlantic
The helmet contains magnets that exert energy on the electrical functioning of the brain, a process known as transcranial magnetic stimulation.... Researchers at some academic institutions are taking the technology seriously. Yale has a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Research Clinic, and the service is offered at Johns Hopkins.

Suicide policies in Canada and beyond: What's working and what needs to change - Ottawa Citizen
[M]olecular biologist Zachary Kaminsky’s research hit the news in 2014 after he and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore discovered a chemical alteration in a gene called SKA2 linked to stress reduction. The finding suggested that doctors could identify suicide risk and even prevent suicide through a blood or saliva test. But it’s complicated, said Kaminsky, who is now the DIFD Mach-Gaensslen Chair in Suicide Prevention Research at The Royal’s Institute of Mental Health Research.

Drugstore chains turn to CBD sales amid prescription reimbursement pressures – Forbes
Whether CBD products actually provide a benefit to consumers and patients is still an open question, according to health experts. “It is a kind of a new snake oil in the sense that there are a lot of claims and not so much evidence,” Dustin Lee, an assistant professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University told the New York Times in a February story.

'Tripping out at therapy centre to treat depression gave me new moments of joy' - Mirror (U.K.)
[Psychedelic drugs] may be illegal in this country but one study at Imperial College London had shown remarkable changes in the brains of people with depression, while researchers at Johns Hopkins University in the US last year called for psilocybin to be reclassified from a dangerous narcotic to a treatment for depression.

Recovery from opioid addiction: What research says about role of steady employment - Burlington Free Press (Vermont)
Kenneth Silverman, professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, is a leading researcher in this … field. Silverman has developed an experimental therapeutic workplace that offers paid employment to poor, unemployed people with opioid dependencies and other substance use disorders — with the understanding that the researchers will be studying them. “We’re studying access to paid work as reinforcer or incentive to abstinence,” Silverman explained.

Give 'shrooms a chance - Anchorage Press
[A] Johns Hopkins group reported that psilocybin decreased both clinician and patient-rated depressed mood, anxiety, and death anxiety. The results showed increased quality of life, sense of connectedness, and optimism. Participants expressed an increased belief that death is not an ending, but rather a transition to something even greater than this life.

When psychedelics make your last months alive worth living – Vice
For more than 15 years, the Johns Hopkins Psychedelic Research Unit has been the foremost research team in the US for psychedelic studies. Key among the topics being explored were psilocybin’s effects on addiction, depression in the physically healthy, and the depression and anxiety brought on by a cancer diagnosis.

Are you overdosing on caffeine? - Outside magazine
Anything over 400 milligrams a day can bring about side effects like headaches, insomnia, an upset stomach, and anxiety, according to the Mayo Clinic, and 14 percent of Americans drink that or more regularly. However, there isn’t a hard number that is unhealthy for everyone, says Maggie Sweeney, a researcher at Johns Hopkins.

Background checks for long gun sales would reduce suicides in Md.* - Baltimore Sun
This opinion piece, which states that "approximately 2,500 Marylanders have died due to firearm suicide in the past decade, mostly in rural areas where long guns are the weapon of choice", was written by Dr. Paul Nestadt, a psychiatrist and epidemiologist on faculty at Johns Hopkins and a researcher focusing on suicide and gun violence.

March

Seasonal affective disorder can happen in the spring & here's what you need to know – Bustle
Neda Gould, PhD, director of the Mindfulness Program at Johns Hopkins Medicine and associate director at the Bayview Anxiety Disorders Clinic, tells Bustle that spring SAD is less common than winter SAD, affecting about four to six percent of the U.S. population. Gould says the underlying cause of spring SAD isn’t fully understood and is different for each person....

Celebs love CBD for pain relief — but does it actually help? - Women's Health
"We don't have what we'd want in terms of clinical trials on [CBD's] safety and efficacy for anything beyond treatment of rare seizure disorder. We need more research,” says Ryan Vandrey, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Phone app may help conquer fear of heights - Reuters and numerous subscribers
Experts welcomed the latest virtual reality therapy. “The bottom line is this is fantastic,” said Dr. O. Joseph Bienvenu, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. “It’s great news that a simple smartphone-based app is available as an efficient exposure therapy.” Also in: KFGO

A new drug for postpartum depression could help everyone - Popular Science
There’s also some genetic overlap, says Jennifer Payne, director of the Women’s Mood Disorders Center at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. “Some genes implicated in major depression are also implicated in postpartum. We know, though, that a portion of the risk for postpartum does not overlap.”

Common ADHD medications may cause psychosis, study finds - NBC News
While the study shows that psychosis is a risk for both stimulants [amphetamines and methylphenidates], it does suggest that amphetamines “may be more implicated than methylphenidates,” said Dr. David Goodman, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. A limitation of the study is that the databases used by the researchers don’t have detailed information on how patients were diagnosed, Goodman said.

Mental health problems are on the rise among American teens and young adults - Los Angeles Times
“It is speculative,” said Dr. Ramin Mojtabai, a Johns Hopkins University psychiatrist whose 2016 research established that depression rates among adolescents and young adults rose steeply between 2005 and 2014. “We don’t have an experimental study in which we have a group of young people exposed and another group that are not exposed to social media, or that removed their digital devices from their hands and measured whether they were less depressed.”

Can LSD and magic mushrooms help win wars? This Marine officer says ‘yes’ - Marine Corps Times
Beyond the scientific research evidence emerging from institutions like Johns Hopkins, NYU or Yale, additional proof of LSD’s benefits, [an article in Marine Corps Times] claims, lies in the number of successful minds who have employed the drug for its cognitive rewards.

8 reasons why your depression may not be getting better – PsychCentral
2. The wrong diagnosis. According to the Johns Hopkins Depression & Anxiety Bulletin, the average patient with bipolar disorder takes approximately 10 years to receive the proper diagnosis. TEN YEARS. About 56 percent are first diagnosed incorrectly with major depressive disorder, leading to treatment with antidepressants alone, which can sometimes trigger mania.

FDA approves nasal spray for treatment-resistant depression - Everyday Health
“It is exciting that the FDA has approved esketamine for treatment-resistant depression,” says Atsushi Kamiya, MD, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. “One thing that makes this drug different from currently available antidepressants is how long it takes to begin working,” he says. “Traditional antidepressants can take a few weeks to see an improvement in symptoms, whereas this drug can improve symptoms of depression very quickly.”

Psychedelic mushrooms can help depression, anxiety, addiction (video) - NBC5 (Dallas-Fort Worth)
Psychedelic (psilocybin) mushrooms are proving helpful for depression, anxiety and addiction, according to research being done at Johns Hopkins University. "Psilocybin is what you'd call a classic psychedelic," said Matthew Johnson, Ph.D. "It very strongly alters conscious experience." Dr. Johnson is a leading expert on the effects of psychedelics, and is part of the Johns Hopkins Psychedelic Research Unit.

10 things we know (as in, actually have published evidence for) about cannabis and health - WBUR-FM (Boston)
“Ten years ago, when you referred to cannabis, you were talking about dried plant material that people smoked,” says Ryan Vandrey, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.... “Now, cannabis — which refers to marijuana and hemp — is a blanket term that could also mean hemp oil, topical creams, CBD products, high-THC concentrates that are smoked, vaporized, or orally ingested and more.” 

What it’s like to smoke salvia for science - Motherboard (Vice)
“This is the first step off the cliff into the void,” Fred Barrett, a cognitive neuroscientist at Johns Hopkins University and the lead researcher on the salvia trial, told me. “This will essentially be setting the roadmap of where future [salvia] research will take us.”

February

Experts say legal weed calls for a ‘paradigm shift’ on how we think about impairment — and drugged driving -  Hartford Courant
[The app] DRUID ... uses four quick tests to measure cognitive impairment. It’s being tested by police in Massachusetts, and used in marijuana research at Johns Hopkins, Yale, University of Colorado, Boulder and Washington State University. Its developer recently learned the federal government intends to fund DRUID with $1.7 million, half going to his subcontractor, Johns Hopkins psychiatry professor Ryan Vandrey.

How to help a loved one with chronic pain - U.S. News & World Report
Rachel Noble is a licensed therapist who specializes in helping people struggling with chronic pain and chronic medical concerns. Noble, who practices in the District of Columbia area, sees firsthand how chronic pain affects family dynamics. She sometimes refers people to the intensive Johns Hopkins Medicine inpatient program for chronic pain.

Does changing medication affect your dreams? Experts explain why you might see some changes – Bustle
Dr. David Neubauer, associate professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine, tells Bustle that vivid dreams and nightmares are a common side effect when people are taking antidepressants, but there's little authoritative research on exactly why that is. "These medications tend to decrease the threshold for awakenings, so people are more aware of dreaming," Dr. Neubauer says.

Denver could soon become the first US city to decriminalize ‘magic’ mushrooms – Insider
In one 2016 study, researchers at Johns Hopkins University gave 29 cancer patients magic mushrooms in combination with psychotherapy sessions to help with depression and anxiety they reported as a result of their diagnoses. The patients who received psilocybin reported immediate reductions in anxiety and depression.

CBD Is everywhere, but scientists still don’t know much about it - New York Times
“It is a kind of a new snake oil in the sense that there are a lot of claims and not so much evidence,” said Dustin Lee, an assistant professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University who is planning a human trial of CBD for use in quitting smoking.

Study bolsters link between prenatal nicotine exposure and ADHD – Reuters
“This is a valuable paper and I think it will contribute to the literature in this field, first of all, by showing with a biological measure of serum cotinine levels as opposed to self-reports to measure nicotine exposure prenatally,” said Dr. Christopher Hammond, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore who wasn’t involved in the study.

Maryland’s end-of-life bill is about one thing: Killing - Washington Post
Dr. Paul McHugh of Johns Hopkins Hospital is quoted in this opinion piece that argues against physician-assisted suicide. “Once doctors agree to assist a person’s suicide, ultimately they find it difficult to reject anyone who seeks their services...." McHugh says.

Can you react badly to melatonin? These 4 signs show your body might not get along with the sleep aid – Bustle
"If melatonin for sleep isn’t helping after a week or two, stop using it," Johns Hopkins sleep expert Luis F. Buenaver, Ph.D., C.B.S.M. said. "And if your sleep problems continue, talk with your health care provider." In addition, "Your body produces melatonin naturally. It doesn’t make you sleep, but as melatonin levels rise in the evening it puts you into a state of quiet wakefulness that helps promote sleep," Dr. Buenaver explained.

7 signs you have a caffeine hangover – Bustle
"Many people consume caffeine without negative consequences, but for some individuals, either regularly consuming too much caffeine or consuming too much at once can cause distress," Mary M. Sweeney, an instructor who researches caffeine's effects on individuals in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told CNN.

Novel Perioperative Pain Program Offers Multimodal Analgesia and Continuity of Care* – Pain Medicine News
“These are just preliminary data, but based on the current literature, we’re very excited about this clinic,” said Traci Jenelle Speed, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore. “We are providing continuity of care where we can continue to educate patients and minimize excessive opioid prescription and utilization that are occurring in the postoperative phase. We’re also helping patients improve physical functioning after surgery.”

40 sites across the country to test new Alzheimer's drug – Forbes
The T2 Protect AD study is newly opened at more than 30 sites across the country, including Yale University School of Medicine ... and University of Miami. More sites will open within the next few weeks, including Vanderbilt Memory & Alzheimer's Center; Columbia University; Johns Hopkins University; and University of Southern California.

Psychedelic mushrooms just put Denver at the center of the national drug debate — again - Denver Post
New research from Johns Hopkins University has shown that ... experiences [with psilocybin] can help people make permanent life changes — at least when used in a controlled, therapeutic setting. Researchers also have found that the drug can bring on terrifying and disturbing experiences, though.

Dissociative identity: Disorder or literalized metaphor? - Psychology Today
Paul R. McHugh, M.D., Distinguished University Professor of Psychiatry and former psychiatrist-in-chief, Johns Hopkins Hospital, is among several experts weighing in on the debate over what formerly was called multiple personality disorder.

Denver should legalize magic mushrooms - National Review
Another study suggests that mushrooms are also helpful for the mental health of those who are suffering with life-threatening illnesses. In 2016, a Johns Hopkins study reported that cancer patients who had received psilocybin experienced an average 78 percent reduction in depression and an 83 percent reduction in anxiety.

Lithium for bipolar maintenance 'safe, tolerable' in kids* (study) – Medscape
From the new study's results, clinicians have "a pretty decent signal" that after the danger of an acute episode has passed, lithium can effectively reduce the risk that children will experience relapse, lead author Robert Findling, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, told Medscape Medical News.

How technology is highlighting the role of inflammation in depression and MS (study) –TechRepublic
Adam Kaplin, MD, Ph.D., at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, talks about how depression is a common occurrence in multiple sclerosis patients and how technology is helping patients better relay data about their mood to their physicians.

Edible marijuana worries doctors after man suffers heart attack - NBC News
[Ryan] Vandrey, a psychiatry researcher at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, was especially disturbed by the high dose of THC in the lollipop [that the man ate]. "Part of my frustration with products like this is that nobody is going to take just a couple of licks and then put it away," he said. "There should be no circumstance where you get a product and you're not supposed to consume the whole thing and it's not clear when you're supposed to stop."

Teen pot smoking raises risk of depression in adulthood, study finds - NBC News
While not surprised by the new results, cannabis researcher Ryan Vandrey isn’t ready to say that cannabis in the teen years causes depression in young adulthood. “We already know that adolescents who use cannabis, particularly the ones who initiate use at a younger age, tend to have other issues,” said Vandrey, an associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. “But this highlights the importance of recognizing that adolescents who do initiate cannabis use are individuals who may need attention and additional care when it comes to mental health.”

Three women's health forums coming up in Naples - Naples News (Florida)
The second event is “A Woman’s Journey,” sponsored by Johns Hopkins Medicine, on Friday, Feb. 22, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.... [It] will feature three speakers on the topics of lung cancer [Dr. Josephine Feliciano], heart disease [Dr. Erin Michos] and suicide [Dr. Karen Swartz].

Dasotraline improves ADHD symptoms in children aged 6 to 12 years – Healio
Treatment with daily dasotraline 4 mg significantly improved ADHD symptoms and behaviors in children aged 6 to 12 years, according to a 6- week, placebo-controlled study. “Approximately one-third of patients treated with stimulant medication do not respond adequately and/or experience safety or tolerability issues,” Robert L. Findling, MD, MBA, of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University, and colleagues wrote. “Therefore, there is a clear need for additional classes of treatments for ADHD.”

Republican Iowa lawmaker proposes decriminalizing psychedelics for medicinal use – Newsweek
Research has shown that mushrooms can ameliorate depression and anxiety in cancer patients. Last year, researchers from Johns Hopkins University recommended the reclassification of psilocybin to allow it to be used medically. "We want to initiate the conversation now as to how to classify psilocybin to facilitate its path to the clinic and minimize logistical hurdles in the future," Matthew W. Johnson, a professor from the university, said.

Mushrooms as medicine? Psychedelics may be next breakthrough treatment – Healthline
In a small pilot study from Johns Hopkins University, researchers found that psilocybin therapy significantly improved abstaining from smoking over a 12-month follow-up period. Matthew Johnson, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, led that study. According to him, psilocybin also has potential to treat other substance use disorders, including alcohol and cocaine addiction.

Rise in the number of suicide deaths -- despite a huge drop in the global rate - Daily Mail (U.K.)
‘Suicide rates are going down but we're not winning the war on suicide,’ Dr Paul Nestadt, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told DailyMail.com. He says that attempts to curb deaths have only worked in some parts of the world -- like the UK and Sri Lanka -- but not in nations like Russia and the US. 

Online psychotherapy for the elderly* - Wall Street Journal
Dr. [Deirdre] Johnston, a geriatric psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Medicine, has been studying the use of telehealth visits as part of a program she helped designed to support family members who care for dementia patients at home. She says video visits ... could accomplish many of the same things as an in-person clinical visit — but with “much less upheaval for the patient and caregiver.”

January

Arizona House may vote on expelling embattled lawmaker - 12 News (Phoenix)
A Democratic Arizona lawmaker asked the state House of Representatives Monday to expel Republican Rep. David Stringer after a newspaper reported that he was charged with sex offenses in 1983 in a case that was later expunged.... The records indicate he was ordered to perform 208 hours of community service and "to seek admission to Dr. Berlin's program at Hopkins." Dr. Frederick Berlin founded the Sexual Disorders Clinic at Johns Hopkins University medical school.

Scientists rethink psychedelics as attitudes change toward formerly illicit drugs - Forbes
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University recently suggested that the FDA’s classification for psilocybin — the psychoactive compound that occurs naturally in hallucinogenic or magic mushrooms — be changed from a Schedule I drug, which has no known medical benefit, to a Schedule IV drug, which is similar to conventional prescription drugs. 

Military ‘transgender ban’ disregards science, humanity* - Baltimore Sun
This opinion piece was written by Kate Thomas, co-director of clinical services at The Sex and Gender Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Contributing to it were Dr. Fred Berlin, director; Chris Kraft, co-director of clinical services; Dr. Chester Schmidt, medical director; and Dr. Matt Taylor, medical director.

Shortening the path to diagnosis - Scientist Live
In cooperation with specialist clinics such as the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore (USA) and committed parents, the researchers from Graz [Austria] collected and analysed data sets of 42 FXS [fragile X syndrome] children.

Do more for football players with head trauma - New York Times
This letter to the editor, which states that “it’s not enough to simply not tune in to the [football] games; we must do more for the athletes and their families living with this insidious brain disorder,” was written by Daniel R. Weinberger, director and chief executive of the Lieber Institute for Brain Development and a professor of psychiatry, neurology, neuroscience and genetics at Johns Hopkins University.

New app may improve ability to focus (study) - Reuters
The new study is “promising,” said Dr. Joseph McGuire, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. “The concept of gamifying therapy is really useful, especially in kids who play games all the time. It’s a great way to incorporate therapeutic skills in a fun manner.”

Students, colleges grapple with mental illness, Caltech speaker says - San Gabriel Valley Tribune (California)
“There’s a serious problem with mental illness and suicide (among) high school and college students and it’s getting worse.” That was the message from Kay Redfield Jamison, professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center, who spoke Tuesday at Caltech to about 75 students and professionals. She came armed with troubling statistics.

Vaping marijuana is technically safer than smoking it, but one caveat could make the habit dangerous for your health - Insider
A 2018 study from Johns Hopkins Medicine, for example, found that infrequent cannabis users may get higher from vaping weed than from smoking it. "What our study suggests is that some people who use cannabis infrequently need to be careful about how much cannabis they use with a vaporizer, and they should not drive, even within several hours after use," Ryan Vandrey, the study's lead author, said in a press release.

Hopkins researchers to study whether financial rewards, video monitoring can help opioid addiction treatment* - Baltimore Sun
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have been awarded $2.1 million by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to study whether paying patients to take their medicine and tracking their doses with video software can help patients stick with their treatment for opioid addiction. Also reported by: Baltimore Business Journal*, Healio

A Melbourne hospital will trial magic mushroom therapy for dying patients - Vice
A medical trial will use magic mushrooms to treat end-of-life anxiety at Melbourne [Australia’s] St Vincent’s Hospital this year.... Similar experiments in the United States regarding the efficacy of mushrooms in a palliative care context have yielded promising results. Studies at New York University and Johns Hopkins University found that terminally ill subjects who were exposed to a dose of psilocybin showed a significant and enduring reduction in anxiety, depression, and existential distress.

Fun with anxiety: Why I’m considering becoming a scofflaw - Portland Mercury (Oregon)
I’ve been researching psychedelic mushrooms as a treatment for anxiety. According to the New York Times, researchers from Johns Hopkins have recently suggested psilocybin (the magic in “magic mushrooms”) be re-classified as a Schedule IV drug so it might be used to treat anxiety after multiple successful trials with anxious cancer patients.

Does glandular fever lead to schizophrenia? Study reveals a link between the common virus and the mental disorder - Daily Mail (U.K.)
Having glandular fever as a teenager could increase your risk of schizophrenia in later life, a study has revealed. The common virus, spread by kissing, was linked to the mental disorder by researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. People with schizophrenia were more than twice as likely to have increased levels of glandular fever-type antibodies, the research found.

Early capillary damage may predict dementia* - MedPage Today
"[The] brain regions [affected] show the earliest pathology in Alzheimer's disease and are associated with memory deficits," observed Gwenn Smith, PhD, of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, who was not part of the research. "These promising results support further investigation of [cerebrospinal fluid] and MRI measures of blood-brain barrier breakdown as an early pathological event associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease," she told MedPage Today.

Have researchers found a new risk factor for schizophrenia? - Medical News Today
Schizophrenia, a condition characterized by a confused perception of reality, delusions, and altered behavior, affects more than 21 million people globally. In a new study, specialists from Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, MD, and the Sheppard Pratt Health System in Townson, MD, found evidence that links schizophrenia with the Epstein-Barr virus.

How can marriage be good for mental health? - U.S. News & World Report
“There is a considerable body of evidence that having meaningful, close social relationships throughout adulthood, including through later life, is related to better physical health, including lower risk for cardiovascular disease and for overall mortality,” says Dr. Susan W. Lehmann, clinical director of the division of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry and director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Day Hospital at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Millennials' odds for depression rise with social media use (study) - HealthDay
[B]ecause this was an observational study, the researchers can't say in what direction the association between depression and social media works, noted Joseph McGuire, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore. He was not involved with the study. "Is it that people who tend to be on social media more then start to feel depressed, or is it that the people who are more depressed are more withdrawn and this is their only social contact?" McGuire asked.

Why rest is the secret to entrepreneurial success entrepreneur - Entrepreneur
According to Joseph Bienvenu, a psychiatrist and director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital, busyness has become a widespread health issue:  “Emotional distress due to overbusyness manifests as difficulty focusing and concentrating, impatience and irritability, trouble getting adequate sleep, and mental and physical fatigue.”

The extraordinary therapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs, explained - Vox
At institutions like Johns Hopkins University and New York University, clinical trials exploring psilocybin as a therapy for treatment-resistant depression, drug addiction, and other anxiety disorders are yielding hopeful results.

How psilocybin — A.K.A. shrooms — could become the next legalized drug - Esquire
[L]ast year, researchers from Johns Hopkins University made headlines when they recommended that the FDA reclassify psilocybin as a Schedule IV drug, alongside drugs like Xanax and Tramadol that have a low risk for abuse. The researchers also said that psilocybin could have therapeutic benefits, which we'll only discover if more research is conducted.

How is melatonin different from CBD for sleep? If you need help sleeping, a supplement can be a short-term fix - Bustle
“You can try a supplement on a short-term basis if you’re experiencing insomnia, want to overcome jet lag, or are a night owl who needs to get to bed earlier and wake up earlier, such as for work or school,” said sleep expert Luis F. Buenaver, Ph.D., C.B.S.M., in an article for Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Magic mushroom decriminalization could be voted on in Denver - U.S. News & World Report
Proponents of the measure say psilocybin mushrooms are safe and non-addictive and can help combat opioid abuse. Last fall, researchers at Johns Hopkins University published a study recommending that psilocybin be reclassified as a Schedule IV drug, noting research that suggests psilocybin is non-addictive and is one of the least harmful drugs.

Do you need to give up coffee if you have anxiety? - Men’s Health
Although you can develop some tolerance for caffeine (depending on the dose, frequency, and your elimination rate), you're never completely tolerant. So caffeine can contribute to anxiety symptoms some days even if you start every morning by heating up your Keurig, says Mary Margaret Sweeney, Ph.D., instructor at the Johns Hopkins Medicine Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit.

What one man learned when he treated his autism symptoms with shrooms - Vice
[W]hile MDMA and psilocybin are different drugs, there's a large overlap when they're used for therapy, according to Albert Garcia-Romeu, a research associate at Johns Hopkins University who led a study giving psilocybin therapy to smokers — and found that 80 percent had quit six months after the trial ended.

2018

December

The Big Trip: How psychedelic drugs are changing lives and transforming psychiatry - CBC (Canada)
[I]n 2012, [Alice O'Donnell] enrolled in a Johns Hopkins University study using psilocybin as a tool for smoking cessation. The drug induced powerful hallucinations, including a disturbing vision of her own damaged lungs. Alice never smoked again, but she says the drugs had other benefits as well: "Just the whole expansion of my thought processes…." she said. Researcher Matthew Johnson, who helped facilitate Alice's psychedelic therapy, likened the experience to a "crash course in meditation." Also reported by: Eastern Ontario Network TV

Opioids kill kids too – through accidental overdose, suicide and homicide (study) - USA Today and subscribers
Dr. Marc Fishman is an addiction psychiatrist and professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who treats teens and young adults with opioid use disorder. He says the [study] results are alarming because deaths to children and teens are increasing the same way as they are for adults – they start with pills, turn to heroin and die from the synthetic opiod painkiller fentanyl. Young people also seek treatment far less often that adults, Fishman says, which makes it harder to track youth opioid use.

Legal weed is everywhere — unless you’re a scientist - Politico
[I]t’s not easy for medical researchers to access even [the marijuana grown on a U.S.-sanctioned pot farm].... [M]eeting the DEA laboratory requirements is costly and gaining approvals for new studies — including for researchers who have previously been verified — can take up to a year, Johns Hopkins psychiatrist Ryan Vandrey wrote in a letter to senators calling for change.

New study warns that vaporising dagga may cause more intoxication - Health24
"It's often a fine line between someone getting the drug effect they desire and having a drug effect that's too strong, and maybe produces paranoia and adverse effects that are uncomfortable for the person," said lead researcher Tory Spindle. "That sort of thing might be more likely with vaporisers," he added. Spindle is a postdoctoral research fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore.

Baltimore ranks city's hospitals for best practices in opioid addiction treatment – Baltimore Sun
Baltimore leaders ranked the city’s 11 hospitals this week for best practices in responding to the opioid crisis. The hospitals were ranked from level one, for the highest standard of care, to three. Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center were both ranked level two.

Study shows tai chi and dance benefit the brain in older adults - Everyday Health
A new meta-analysis [has] found that older adults who participate in mind-body exercises can actually show improvements in several important aspects of brain function, such as memory, verbal fluency, and learning. These findings are not surprising considering that we already know that mental activities and physical activities are good for the brain, says Neda Gould, PhD, a clinical psychologist and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, who was not involved in this research.

Cannabis for Christmas? In Minnesota, CBD products are hot this holiday - Minneapolis Star Tribune
Much of the scientific research [on cannabis' medicinal value] is in its early stages, but many are clearly already embracing the promise of CBD. The Colorado-based nonprofit Realm of Caring ... is working to create a research registry, partnering with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to collect information from tens of thousands of people using [CBD] as a therapy for autism, cerebral palsy and other disorders.

How marijuana can harm teenage brains, and what may be done to prevent the damage - New Atlas
In a compelling new study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have established a fascinating hypothesis attempting to explain how marijuana use in some teenagers can result in cognitive impairment in adulthood. The research also suggests anti-inflammatory therapies may be able to prevent the marijuana-induced brain damage.

Understanding addiction: Researchers look at solving opioid crisis (video) - WMAR-TV
Researchers ... are fighting back against the opioid crisis, not in court but on campus. At Johns Hopkins Medicine, Dr. Kelly Dunn is leading research that asks the question, what if you could predict addiction?

Teen marijuana use may trigger inflammation linked to schizophrenia and mental illness later in life, mouse study suggests - Daily Mail
The link between marijuana and schizophrenia has been studied often, and seems hard to deny though how one affects the other is a muddier question. But scientists at Johns Hopkins University believe that they have uncovered how marijuana can be the trigger for schizophrenia in teens that are already genetically predisposed to the disorder.

Mental illness doesn't mean mass murder* - MedPage Today
Paul S. Nestadt, MD, an assistant professor, and Elizabeth Prince, DO, an instructor, both of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in Baltimore are among the writers of this opinion piece.

Maintenance lithium treatment shows potential for pediatric bipolar disorder - Psychiatric Annals
Lithium demonstrated tolerability and safety as a maintenance treatment in pediatric patients with bipolar disorder for 28 weeks, study findings showed. “There are limited prospective long-term pharmacological treatment data for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. Previous prospective data in the pediatric age group have generally been restricted to combination pharmacotherapy studies,” Robert L. Findling, MD, MBA, of Johns Hopkins University, and colleagues wrote.

Childhood antibiotics could raise risk of mental illness, study finds - Gizmodo
A common hypothesis ... is that [childhood] infections may cause chronic inflammation or other bodily side-effects that directly damage the brain. But study author Robert Yolken, a neurovirologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and his team decided to explore a different possible explanation for why infections are linked to mental illness.

11 side effects of antipsychotics you should know about - Self
“The crucial thing is that anyone taking an antipsychotic, even at a relatively low dose, needs to be aware that there are side effects and needs to be working with a physician who they feel comfortable in contacting, should something come up,” Russell Margolis, M.D., clinical director of the Johns Hopkins Schizophrenia Center, tells SELF.

Magic mushrooms are inching closer to decriminalization in Denver and Oregon - Vice
[T]he Denver and Oregon groups trying to decriminalize psilocybin point to research from New York University’s Langone Medical Center and Johns Hopkins University, for example, that shows the drug can help cancer patients dealing with depression and anxiety. Researchers at Johns Hopkins also recently found that the hallucinogen has a low potential for abuse.

Study: Vaping pot makes for a more intense high - Newser
Hey … you want to get high? If so, you may want to consider vaping your weed, rather than smoking it. According to a study published in JAMA Network Open, the former results in “significantly greater drug effects, cognitive and psychomotor impairment, and higher blood THC concentrations” than the latter. And just how did the researchers with Johns Hopkins Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit make this determination?

Psilocybin for the masses: Oregon considering legalizing mushrooms - Rolling Stone
Currently, psychedelic mushrooms, which contain the active compound psilocybin, are classified as a Schedule I drug by the FDA, the same category as heroin and cocaine. ... Earlier this year, researchers at Johns Hopkins recommended that it be reclassified as Schedule IV, the same category as Xanax. Reclassification, however, could take up to five years.

Some people relive psychedelic trips years later - Vice
Matthew Johnson, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, [estimates] that “one in many thousands of users” have flashbacks that interfere with their lives.... “Many users report some brief visual abnormalities occurring after acute hallucinogen effects, but only for a small minority of users are these effects troubling or impairing enough to be considered clinically significant or warrant the diagnosis of [hallucinogen persisting perception disorder],” Johnson explains.

How to recognize and treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) - The Fix
Although many people joke that they feel like hibernating during the winter, people who actually have seasonal affective disorder experience depressive symptoms that are severe enough to interfere with day-to-day life, just like the symptoms experienced by people with major depression. “Diagnosis of SAD lies on the spectrum of depression,” said Dr. Neeraj Gandotra, a psychiatrist who is on the faculty at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine…. “It’s a form of depression.”

Oregon is closer than ever to becoming the first state to legalize magic mushrooms - Business Insider
Earlier this year, researchers at Johns Hopkins University said psilocybin should not be classified as a Schedule I drug, a category for substances with no known medical benefit. In an article from the October issue of the medical journal Neuropharmacology, the researchers wrote that psilocybin should instead be labeled a Schedule IV drug, a category that includes prescription sleeping pills.

‘I don’t feel like I’m doing something wrong’: Yuppies have discovered pot — and they like it - Washington Post
“If you can walk down to a nice retail storefront, and you’ve got really clever marketing and packaging . . . there’s some allure to that,” says Ryan Vandrey, a cannabis expert in the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

November

Vaping pot is more powerful than smoking it, study finds - NBC News and numerous subscribers
It’s important to understand the impact of vaping as more and more states legalize cannabis and the drug becomes more easily accessible, said the study’s lead author, Tory Spindle, a postdoctoral research fellow at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. “ “People] should be aware that vaping will produce stronger effects [than smoking].”
Also reported by: HealthDay and numerous subscribers, Live ScienceInverse

Unpleasant surprises with blood pressure drug for PTSD* (study) - Medscape
Reached for comment, Matthew Johnson, PhD, of the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, said the results are "noteworthy" and "concerning for the use of the drug in PTSD patients.

Vaping cannabis gets people higher than smoking it, study shows - Newsweek
Vaping cannabis makes users feel higher than smoking the drug, according to … research carried out at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine [that] involved 17 adults who rarely used marijuana. When participants inhaled vaporized cannabis at 25mg strength, they experienced “stronger effects” and had higher concentrations of THC in their blood when compared with those who smoked the same dose.

8 meditations to help you destress during the holidays - Bustle
If the thoughts in your head sound like an angry mob trying to get through security at the airport, mindfulness meditation can help your brain calm down. Neda Gould, Ph.D., clinical psychologist and director of the Johns Hopkins Mindfulness Program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, shared on the school's website how mindfulness can be beneficial for the overactive brain.

ICU stay can lead to depression (study) - Reuters
The new findings were somewhat of a surprise for Dr. Joe Bienvenu, an associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “We knew that symptoms of depression were associated with a worse quality of life after a critical illness,” Bienvenu said. “But this shows that they are also associated with mortality. I was struck by the fact that they were 47 percent more likely to die.”

'Ego death' is the trip competitive psychedelic users are chasing - Vice
Psychedelics have a long therapeutic history, and are currently being studied at Imperial College London, Johns Hopkins University and NYU, while – combined with professional support – they've been shown to help alleviate depression, addiction and anxiety in the terminally ill.

Johns Hopkins saves millions, improves outcomes with its J-CHiP care coordination program - Fierce Healthcare
Johns Hopkins launched a care coordination program that boosted outcomes and saved millions in care costs for some of Baltimore’s most vulnerable patients. The Johns Hopkins Community Health Partnership (J-CHiP) is a care coordination program with two central elements: a set of acute care interventions ... and a community-based care management piece based primarily in ambulatory care settings....

Everything to know about brain stimulation therapies for mental health - Self
“[Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation] is very well-tolerated, and there are no cognitive side-effects such as memory loss associated with it,” Irving Michael Reti, M.B.B.S., M.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at The Johns Hopkins University and director of the Brain Stimulation Program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, tells SELF.

Stories from The Stoop: Graham Redgrave – WYPR
Here's a Stoop Story from Dr. Graham Redgrave, an expert in treating eating disorders.

Psilocybin trials for depression treatment get greenlight from FDA - The Fix
“FDA Breakthrough status is a big deal,” Matthew Johnson, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, told Inverse. “It implies that the FDA recognizes the treatment is potentially one with a large impact on a largely under-treated condition.”

Are party drugs the next medicine? (video) - Dr. Oz Show
Matthew Johnson, Ph.D., a leading specialist doing scientific studies on psychedelic drugs at Johns Hopkins, explains his research on hallucinogenic drugs and how they are affecting patients, for example, with severe depression. "This is cutting-edge medicine," says Johnson. "I really view it as a new paradigm in psychiatry and in medicine -- medication-facilitated psychotherapy."

Mounting evidence links sleep disturbance to Alzheimer's disease - Forbes

According to a new study, older adults who felt sleepy during the day when they wanted to be awake were almost three times more likely to have deposits of beta-amyloid — the protein that clumps in the brain as part of Alzheimer’s pathology. The research team was led by Dr. Adam Spira of Johns Hopkins University….

October

FDA "breakthrough" ruling on magic mushrooms, explained by scientists - Inverse
Roland Griffiths, Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, heads the lab that conducted the first contemporary FDA-approved clinical trial on psilocybin in 2000. He’s encouraged by the news. “This is a significant positive development in the potential future regulatory approval of psilocybin, a classic psychedelic drug, for medicinal purposes,” Griffiths tells Inverse.

A woman’s journey to health (audio) - WYPR-FM
Next month, Johns Hopkins physicians will present research on a range of topics about women’s health. Two doctors join us for a preview. Nephrologist Deidra Crews describes the disproportionate impact of kidney disease on women of color, the challenge of detecting an illness that often presents no symptoms in early stages, and her research on how diet helps. Constantine Lyketsos, who heads Hopkins’ ‘Memory and Alzheimer’s Treatment Center,’ shares strategies to preserve brain health.

Here comes the legal case for medicinal psychedelics - Vice
“I’m prepared to stay legal, to completely respect the law,” [Bruce Tobin, a Canadian psychotherapist and psilocybin advocate] said. “We have chosen to emulate the research at Johns Hopkins as closely as we possibly can because they are the leaders in the science….”

Teen-reported heroin, prescription use drops, but experts urge more drug-use treatment - Cincinnati Enquirer
Marc Fishman, medical director of Maryland Treatment Centers, which treats adolescents and young adults with addiction, and an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University Department of Psychiatry, said treatment needs to cover all kinds of drug use.... "We need more treatment," Fishman said. “Treatment of cocaine-use disorder. Treatment of alcohol-use disorder. Treatment of marijuana-use disorder.”

Link identified between cured meat and mania in bipolar disorder - Psychiatry Advisor
A recent study found a strong and independent link between current mania and a history of eating nitrated dry cured meat such as beef jerky. Psychiatry Advisor interviewed study author Seva G. Khambadkone, an MD-PhD candidate and researcher at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Acid test – Are hallucinogenics finally shaking off their taboo? - Irish Medical Times
By late 1960s psychedelics were made illegal, regarded as Schedule 1 drugs with no medical or therapeutic benefit. It more or less stayed that way until the 2000s when Roland Griffiths, professor of psychiatry, and his team at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore published a paper in 2006 in the journal Psychopharmacology with the words “mystical,” “spiritual” and “psilocybin” in the title and later in 2016 a paper looking at depression and anxiety in patients who received a life-threatening cancer diagnosis.

Nonopioid approaches to pain: The hunt is on*  – Medscape News
Traci Speed, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, told Medscape Medical News that "the more classic medicines," such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and naproxen, can also offer benefit.
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Symptoms of mental illness in seniors you shouldn’t ignore - CBS12-TV (West Palm Beach, Fla.)
Dr. Susan W. Lehmann, who is the clinical director of the division of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry and director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Day Hospital at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told the U.S. News & World Report that “adults over age 65 are much less likely to be asked by their primary care physician if they felt tense or anxious and were much less likely to be referred by their primary care physician for mental health specialty care.”

'SNL' star Pete Davidson says 'there's no shame in the medicine game' - NBC News
Some patients may worry that treating the disorder might crimp their creativity. But “most people, in the few studies that have been done, are as productive if not more productive once they’ve gotten treatment,” Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and author of “Touched with Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament,” told NBC News in an earlier interview.

Depression: Common but undertreated in people with MS, expert says - Everyday Health
Treating and managing depression in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) is as important as treating and managing other symptoms of this central nervous system disease, such as weakness and numbness, says Adam Kaplin, MD, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences in the departments of psychiatry and neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Kaplin is one of only a few neuropsychiatrists specializing in MS.

“Magic Mushrooms” may be an FDA-approved drug for anxiety and depression in the near future - Vogue
Cannabis — at the gym, in your morning smoothie and your lip balm — is becoming more mainstream by the day. So naturally, many wonder: What’s next? According to researchers at Johns Hopkins, it’s psilocybin, also known as the hallucinogen found in “magic mushrooms.”

10 physical symptoms of anxiety, because it’s not all mental - Self
When people talk about anxiety, they often focus on its mental and emotional effects. That makes perfect sense, as the overwhelming worry and fear that characterize anxiety can be debilitating. But many anxiety disorders can come with … physical symptoms, too. “When a person experiences anxiety, it’s essentially the fight-or-flight system kicking in and saying, ‘Danger!’” Neda Gould, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and associate director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Anxiety Disorders Clinic, tells SELF.

Why I often trust common sense over data (commentary) - Psychology Today
[I]f I had an illness for which [marijuana] might be a drug of choice, I’d try it. And, if I had late-stage terminal disease, I’d probably try LSD or psilocybin mushrooms because recent studies, including from Johns Hopkins, report major improvements in state of mind. Since I’d be dying soon anyway, I’d have little to lose by trying it.

Opioid bill expands treatment options - Huffington Post
In another change to longstanding federal policy, the new opioid package would for the first time allow Medicare to cover methadone, one of three medications considered the gold standard for addiction treatment.... In Maryland, Kenneth Stoller, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, called the provision “a tremendous step forward.”

Stop blaming physicians for suicide spike - MedPage Today
Paul S. Nestadt, MD, an assistant professor, and Elizabeth Prince, DO, an instructor in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, are among the writers of this opinion piece, which calls suicide a public health issue that is much larger than the doctor-patient relationship.

Most older breast cancer patients do not suffer mental decline after chemo (study) - Reuters
“This is an important study,” said Tracy Vannorsdall, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine [who was not involved in the study] “We know breast cancer occurs more frequently in older women. But there are far fewer studies in older women showing how diseases and treatments affect them. There’s been a need for this kind of study.”

Dr. Peter J. Fagan, former director of research and development at Johns Hopkins HealthCare, dies* - Baltimore Sun
Dr. Peter J. Fagan, a former priest and a clinical psychologist who had been director of the Sexual Behaviors Consultation Unit at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Saturday from multiple myeloma at his Fulton residence. He was 77.
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Psychedelic mushrooms are closer to medicinal use (it’s not just your imagination) - New York Times
Researchers from Johns Hopkins University have recommended that psilocybin, the active compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms, be reclassified for medical use, potentially paving the way for the psychedelic drug to one day treat depression and anxiety and help people stop smoking.

Why doctors want to reclassify psilocybin, the drug that puts the 'magic' in mushrooms - Fortune
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University hope to eventually reclassify psilocybin from a schedule I to schedule IV drug, according to a news release from the research institution. Psilocybin is the psychedelic drug that puts the “magic” in mushrooms. The hallucinogenic drug has been shown to offer therapeutics benefits such as alleviating symptoms of depression and helping people to quit smoking, for example.
Also reported by: Vice, Boing, Boing, PsychCentral

September

Suicide in adults on the rise in the United States (video) - WMAR-TV
Dr. Dan Hale, a clinical psychologist and special advisor to the President of Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, shares a story of suicide in his family and calls suicide a medical problem that shouldn't be viewed as a personal failure or weakness.… Dr. Paul Nestadt, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins, talks about the red flags that often come when someone has major depressive disorder that could lead to suicide.

Magic mushrooms should be less illegal, scientists argue - Inverse
In a paper appearing in the October issue of Neuropharmacology, a team from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Alabama laid out evidence showing that psilocybin is safe for humans, effective at treating several serious conditions, and non-addictive.

'It's difficult to predict:' Psychiatrist discusses mental illness's part in mass shootings – (video) WBAL-TV
"About 5 percent of homicides are committed by someone who has a serious mental illness," said Paul Nestadt, a psychiatrist at [Johns] Hopkins Hospital. Nestadt said there are all kinds of factors that can come into play, including access to guns. "Even a professional can't really, reliably predict violence. It's difficult to predict," he said.

Take the time to be sure before transgender move* (letter to the editor) – Wall Street Journal
Regarding Jillian Kay Melchior’s “Peer Pressure and ‘Transgender’ Teens” (op-ed, Sept. 10): Clinical generalizations are often misleading. After 45 years of caring for transgendered patients, I teach psychiatric residents, “When you have seen one transgendered patient, you have seen one transgendered patient.” -- Prof. Chester Schmidt, M.D., Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore
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Psychedelic drugs to treat depression, PTSD? - WebMD
[R]esearch by Matthew Johnson, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins, and others at Johns Hopkins found psilocybin can produce “clinically significant” improvements in depression and anxiety in patients with life-threatening cancer. The drug may be able to provide hope where conventional antidepressant drugs have had little effect, he says.

Chronic pain may contribute to suicide, study warns  - Reuters
[C]hronic pain sufferers were three times as likely as others to have tested positive for opioids when they died. That’s an important stat, said Dr. Paul Nestadt of the department of psychiatry and behavioral health at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. “Opioids are depressants and they increase the risk of depression,” said Nestadt, who is not affiliated with the new research. “Depression is one of the highest risk factors for completing suicide.”

Rebooting Becky’s brain – Spectrum
Another team, led by Irving M. Reti at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, has tested DBS in two autism mouse models of self-injury: One strain lacks the MECP2 gene on the X chromosome, and the other has been stripped of both copies of SHANK3. Both strains self-groom excessively, gnawing on their paws and obsessively rubbing them together, and biting their tail all the way down its length.

Is there a difference between an anxiety attack and a panic attack? – Self
“In my experience, a patient will say, ‘I had an anxiety attack,’ but what they mean is that they had a panic attack,” Neda Gould, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and associate director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Anxiety Disorders Clinic, tells SELF. “‘Anxiety attack’ is more of a layperson's term.”

How to deal with suicidal thoughts — from 7 women who’ve been there – Women’s Health
There's a difference … between having brief flashes of ending your life, and ruminating about it constantly and forming a plan, says Neeraj Gandotra, M.D., a psychiatrist and instructor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. While the former is normal (although disturbing), the latter means you should seek help immediately, he says.

America becoming a no-vacation nation – Creators Syndicate
According to Joseph Bienvenu, director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at Johns Hopkins, [sheer busyness] leads to a vicious cycle of emotional distress. "Emotional distress due to over-busyness manifests as difficulty focusing and concentrating, impatience and irritability, trouble getting adequate sleep, and mental and physical fatigue," he said. Bienvenu also noted that he sees patients so wound up from overscheduling that they can't sleep, think or make time for important activities.

August

ADHD diagnoses may be rising in U.S. (study)  - Reuters
Experts suggested that some of the "diagnoses" might be incorrect. "You really have to interpret the study with caution," said Amie Bettencourt, an assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.... Bettencourt has seen a lot of misdiagnoses. 

Later breakfast, earlier dinner might help you shed body fat  - HealthDay
"Time-restricted feeding may have benefits, but could be hard to stick to, so larger trials testing effectiveness as well as feasibility of different schedules are needed," said [Susan] Carnell, who is an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with Johns Hopkins Medicine. "Another point to consider might be that probably some schedules will work better for some people than others, so individual tailoring will probably be important for feasibility," she added.

North West Housing Partnership administers ‘Aging in Place’ program in area suburbs - Chicago Tribune
North West Housing Partnership (NWHP) is proud to be administering the CAPABLE (Community Aging in Place, Advancing Better Living for Elders) program, which has a goal to help senior citizens remain in their homes as long as possible…. This pilot program is modeled after one that was developed at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and is the first of its kind to be implemented in the Chicago area. Also reported by: Journal & Topics (Chicago)

Why the Jacksonville attacker was able to legally buy guns - Washington Post
For adults to be involuntarily committed, someone must file a petition for emergency evaluation that is then approved by a judge, according to Michelle Horner, assistant professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. For minors, even if they do not want to go, that would not be considered an involuntary commitment if parents’ consent on their behalf, she said.

Magic mushrooms might be the next mental health frontier - Vox
Psilocybin is not intended to be prescribed and taken repeatedly to treat mental illness, as is done with antidepressants, says William Richards, a researcher from Johns Hopkins. University researchers use different doses while testing to see the shifts in behavior. And the process must be controlled, or a bad experience is much more likely to occur. That’s why Richards doesn’t recommend trying these psychedelics at home.

Here’s what happens when a few dozen people take small doses of psychedelics - The Atlantic
There’s new — and possibly dubious — evidence that “microdosing” hallucinogenic drugs makes people more creative…. Matthew Johnson, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University who has researched psychedelics, brought up some concerns about the study’s results. “I have virtually no confidence that this isn’t driven by placebo effect….” he said.

An urban-rural divide over gun suicide - The Bulletin (Oregon)
In 2017, Dr. Paul Nestadt, a psychiatrist with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, wondered how much of the urban-rural suicide disparity could be attributed to gun ownership rates. His home state of Maryland was the first to have a systematized statewide medical examiner system that made reviewing the data on suicide easy. 

Setting the record straight on medical psilocybin - Scientific American
Three Johns Hopkins researchers -- Matthew Johnson, Roland Griffiths and Jack Henningfield -- and a co-researcher from the University of Alabama at Birmingham say a  recent critique of their peer-reviewed assessment of medical psilocybin abuse liability in Neuropharmacology was unfair.

A fit person’s guide to CBD products and supplements - GQ
[T]here’s no definitive research on CBD and athletes, says Ryan Vandrey, a Johns Hopkins School of Medicine professor whose research has evaluated the use of cannabis and cannabinoids to treat health conditions. The problem, he explains, is that CBD has hit the market without the type of research that support drugs regulated by the FDA. Now, science has to catch up.

FDA approves psychedelic magic mushrooms ingredient psilocybin for depression trial - Newsweek
A … 2016 study by researchers at the New York University and Johns Hopkins University showed a single dose of psilocybin decreased symptoms of anxiety in cancer patients for eight months when compared to a placebo. The findings were published in The Journal of Psychopharmacology

Can LSD help solve mental health issues? (study) - CBS News
Dr. Tony Bossis, of New York University, ... along with researchers at Johns Hopkins University, published their findings of what a one-time dose of psilocybin can do to treat anxiety and depression in cancer patients. It was eye-opening. "In this study, anxiety and depression reduced dramatically, immediately after the experience," he said.

Brush with madness - CBS News
"Study after study after study has shown that there is a disproportionate rate of mood disorders, in particular, in highly-creative people," said Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and is considered a leading expert on mood disorders in artists.

Dr. Frederick W. Schaerf, psychiatrist and noted Alzheimer's researcher, dies - Baltimore Sun
Dr. Frederick W. Schaerf, a psychiatrist and former associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died July 14 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, at his home in Fort Myers, Fla. He was 67.

Learning To Live Well With Dementia - The Washington Post
At first, the most significant need may be obtaining a reliable diagnosis and learning more about the type of dementia your physician has identified. According to a new study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University, nearly 60 percent of people with dementia have not been diagnosed or are not aware of their diagnosis.

So, about that study that linked processed meats to mania... Self
[R]esearchers can’t exactly give rats a survey about their mood or behavior changes. “We can’t say that rats are ‘manic’,” study co-author Kellie Tamashiro, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, tells SELF. “[But] what we can do is test for behavioral correlates of mania, what we refer to as ‘mania-like behavior.’”

How can you treat someone who doesn’t accept they are ill? (study) Mosaic
The idea that some people with mental illness lack insight into their condition wasn’t new. It had been codified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ... for several illnesses, including schizophrenia and anorexia nervosa. But using the word anosognosia was another matter entirely, says Dinah Miller, a psychiatrist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “It’s a politically charged word,” she says. 

The hidden danger of suicide in autism – Spectrum
“We increase our detection of suicidal kids when we screen for it,” says Holly Wilcox, associate professor of mental health and psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University. “It gives us a window of opportunity to help them if we can link them up with appropriate services. Oftentimes, the suicidal individual will feel relieved that they were asked and they could disclose their thoughts.”

What is 'microdosing'? Tiny hits of psychedelic drugs reduce anxiety without the trip, study says - Newsweek
“Unlike almost all other psychiatric medications that have a direct biological effect, these drugs seem to work through biology to open up a psychological opportunity,” Matthew Johnson, a Johns Hopkins University psychiatrist, told NBC News in 2017.

Q&A: Identifying, treating depression in elderly patients -Healio Internal Medicine
About 5% to 10% of elderly patients have depression or depressive symptoms, according to a presentation by Jin Hui Joo, MA, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, at Johns Hopkins Science Writers’ Boot Camp…. In an exclusive interview, Healio Internal Medicine spoke with Joo about the signs of and risk factors for depression among older adults, as well as how PCPs can help elderly patients cope with changes and associated depression.

People With Depression May Have Less of This Chemical in Their Bodies -VICE
“This is the first paper that says people with clinical depression have low levels of this molecule,” says James Potash, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

July

Could a Blood Test Help Spot Severe Depression? - U.S. News & World Report
In the future, Brennan said, treatment trials might include only depression patients who have particularly low LAC levels. Dr. James Potash, a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University, agreed. "It may well be better to focus on those patients, because they might have the best chance of responding [to supplements]," said Potash, who was not involved in the study.

Study: Eating beef jerky might be linked to manic episodes in some people - Gizmodo
There is no singular cause of mental illness. Any number of things — our genes, environment, and even social mores — play a role in determining whether someone’s mental health will deteriorate to the point of being diagnosable as a disease. But researchers from Johns Hopkins have stumbled onto a possible trigger for manic episodes they didn’t expect to find: beef jerky.

Most firearm deaths in America involve suicide, not bad guys with guns - North Country Public Radio
"As I looked into suicide more and more it became very clear that access to lethal means, specifically guns, was one of the most important risk factors that we could address," said Paul Nestadt, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins who researches suicide with the School of Public Health.

A scientist clarifies the link between eating beef jerky and mania - Inverse
Eating lots of hot dogs and beef jerky is perhaps not the wisest choice for physical health, but until recently, doing so seemed fine as far as mental health was concerned. But a new paper … has raised concerns about the connection between eating nitrated dry-cured meats and mania. One author of the study, Johns Hopkins pediatrics professor Dr. Robert Yolken, is here to set the record straight.
Also reported by: HLN/CNN, Time, The Atlantic, Bustle, The Sun (U.K.), The Scotsman (Scotland)

Hopkins researchers: Processed meats could cause mania (video) -WBFF-TV
Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have just uncovered a possible link between processed meats and manic episodes. Dr. Robert Yolken, a professor of pediatrics … and the senior author on the new study, has found a potential link between cured meats and psychiatric disorders. “Individuals who said they were exposed to cured meats had an increased rate of mania,” said Yolken. Also reported by: Newsweek, NBC News, Telegraph (U.K.), Daily Mail, CTV (Canada), HealthDay, MedPage Today, Miami Herald, CBS Philly, The Mirror (U.K.) Hans India, Daily Press (Newport News, Va.) Irish News and numerous other media outlets

Does eating beef jerky cause psychiatric symptoms? Not so fast. (study) - Live Science
Kellie Tamashiro, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine who worked on the rat study, noted that rats are far from perfect analogues to human beings. What happened to rats fed cured meats might not translate to humans, she told Live Science.

Should we loosen the restrictions on psychedelics? - Scientific American
[H]ow one understands the psychedelic drug state determines the assessment of risks and benefits, and thus drives recommendations for rescheduling. The Johns Hopkins University research group has been one of the most active [on this issue] in the U.S. over the last 15 years.

An immigrant community haunted by suicide - Stateline (Pew Trusts)
To better understand the tragedies, researchers … at Johns Hopkins University have begun to gather information on immigrant suicide.... “Stress and depression in the immigrant community have always been there, but it is heightened now,” Johns Hopkins psychiatrist Rheanna Platt told Stateline. “I see more children being very distressed about the possibility that a parent will be deported.” (Note: Johns Hopkins therapist Donna Batkis and researcher Paul Nestadt are also quoted in this article.)

National Network of Indian Depression Centers Partners with U.S. Depression Centers Network (Press Release)
Raymond DePaulo, MD, of Johns Hopkins University, NNDC Chair, said, "The leadership team assembled for the founding board of directors for NNDC India Foundation is truly impressive. I am pleased to welcome their affiliation with the NNDC. It is an honor to work with Dr. Rao and the group of leaders in psychiatry in India as they build NNDC India Foundation and bring much needed focus to depressive diseases in India and contribute to solutions globally."

June

Extreme stress in childhood is toxic to your DNA (opinion) - The Conversation
This opinion piece was written by Daniel R. Weinberger, director of the Lieber Institute for Brain Development and the Maltz Research Laboratories at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Studies by him and other researchers, he says, have shown that early life stress alters how DNA is packaged, which makes cells function differently than their original mandate.

In search of the Alzheimer's aha! moment AARP
Even delaying the onset of the disease by a few years would be a significant step, says the author of this commentary, Marilyn S. Albert, Ph.D., the director of Cognitive Neuroscience in the department of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the chair of the AARP Global Council on Brain Health.

Retinal thinning tied to cognitive decline* (study) - Medscape
Also commenting on the study for Medscape Medical News, Esther Seunghee Oh, MD, PhD, associate director of Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center and associate professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland, said the link between retinal thinning and cognitive decline is "exciting" on several levels.

New restrictions on epilepsy drug may do more harm than good - Spectrum
Jennifer Payne, director of the Women’s Mood Disorders Center at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, explains why she thinks it’s a bad idea that the EU ban stipulates that women with bipolar disorder must stop taking valproate during pregnancy, even if no other medication works for them. [Valproate is a widely used treatment for epilepsy, bipolar disorder and migraine.]

Even 'mild' high blood pressure risks future dementia – AARP
"Being diagnosed with high blood pressure in, say, your 50s may predict a dementia risk in your 70s and 80s," says neuropsychiatrist Constantine Lyketsos of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "The mechanism is not clear, but it's probably because moderately ... elevated blood pressure in midlife slowly erodes the blood vessels in the brain and affects the blood supply to the deeper tissues of the brain over the years."

Mental illness: A different kind of #MeToo* (opinion) -Baltimore Sun
The deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain are sparking a different kind of #MeToo movement in which others are coming forward and confessing their private pain across CNN, Twitter, Facebook and other media outlets…. I have numerous relatives with bipolar disorder, and I am often one of the few lay people in the crowd at the annual Mood Disorders Symposiums at Johns Hopkins.

Suicide Is Not Just a US Problem, It's a Global Issue – Voice of America
Jennifer Payne, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Medicine, said just because the CDC reported a majority of those who committed suicide did not have a known mental illness, does not mean they didn't have one. "I think it's likely that a majority of cases of suicide are related to a mental health diagnosis," she said. The illness could have been undiagnosed, or because of the stigma associated with mental illness, people may have not sought treatment.

Ketamine cases raise questions over boundaries between police and paramedics - Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
Dr. Solomon Snyder, a neuroscience professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, compared the effects [of ketamine] to those of LSD, and said [the drug] hasn’t been more widely used in depression cases because of its risks. “If you take it, you’ll be out of your head,” he said. “So even if it’s good for depression, you have to do it very carefully.”

Why mental illness is so hard to spot in seniors - U.S. News & World Report
[C]ompared with younger adults and middle-aged adults, adults over age 65 were much less likely to be asked by their primary care physician if they felt tense or anxious and were much less likely to be referred by their primary care physician for mental health specialty care,” says Dr. Susan W. Lehmann, clinical director of the division of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry and director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Day Hospital at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Psychedelics forge connections between neurons (study) - Chemical & Engineering News
About one-third of people with depression do not find relief from their symptoms with current drugs for the disease…. Roland Griffiths, a neuroscientist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine agrees that the new study is important. “Almost nothing is known about the neural mechanisms underlying the ability of psychedelics to produce enduring change in moods, attitudes, and behavior,” he says.

U.S. needs to have an ongoing conversation about suicide - How Stuff Works
"I think we need to be having a national conversation," Jennifer Payne, the director of the Women's Mood Disorders Center and an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, says. "I think there's a stigma associated with psychiatric illness that really needs to go away," Payne says.

Mental Health and Well-Being in America - Washington Post Live
Robert Findling, division director of child and adolescent psychiatry, was part of a panel hosted and broadcast by the Washington Post.

Invincibility: Young people and their decisions (video) - WMAR-TV
“The reason that adolescents tend to engage in risk-taking behavior is that they’re more focused on the potential rewards of that behavior. So when they think about driving fast in a car with friends, they’re more focused on their friends having a blast and cheering them on or the thrill of the wind going through their hair,” Dr. Elizabeth Reynolds, a clinical psychologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital, said.

The woman’s libido pill is back – and so is the controversy - Bloomberg
“If you have somebody who’s depressed, and you give them an antidepressant, you don’t want the drug to make them joyous and turn them into a manic state. You want the drug to return them to normal function,” says Leonard Derogatis, an associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “That’s exactly what the goal is with all the sexual drugs...."

Why eight hours sleep really IS good for you: Less than six or more than 10 hours slumber a night raises the risk of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes - The Daily Mail (U.K.)
Sleeping for more than ten hours a night -- or fewer than six -- may increase the risk of early death, new research has found…. Dr. Patrick Finan from Johns Hopkins University, who was not involved in the study, said: 'Insomnia is shaped by expectation and perception, so it is not surprising that placebos, which implicitly alter expectation, are effective in improving perceptions of sleep.'

Kate Spade’s death ignites concern about rising suicide rate - Kaiser Health News and numerous subscribers
People suffering from serious mental illness are at high risk of suicide, said Dr. Jennifer Payne, director of the Women’s Mood Disorders Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital.... Sometimes, however, friends and families of people with a milder form of bipolar disorder — one that does not induce psychotic behavior — can mistake their condition for depression, Payne said. 

Kate Spade and the Troubling Rise in Female Suicides – Daily Beast
Karen Swartz is the clinical director of the John Hopkins Mood Disorders Center, where she researches people who are working through depression and bipolar disorder and helps train teachers at high schools, who often reach out to her in the aftermath of a tragic high school suicide.

May

Pregnancy complications might 'turn on' schizophrenia genes, study says - CNN
"The complications that mattered were very serious obstetric complications like pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction and premature rupture of membranes without induction of labor," said Dr. Daniel Weinberger, director and CEO of the Lieber Institute for Brain Development at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a leading author of the new study.

You can inherit schizophrenia. But what happens during pregnancy is key, new study says - Miami Herald
“For the first time, we have found an explanation for the connection between early life complications, genetic risk, and their impact on mental illness and it all converges on the placenta,” Daniel R. Weinberger, the lead investigator on the study from [Johns Hopkins University's] Lieber Institute for Brain Development, said in a statement. Also reported by: StatScientific American

How to help someone who has depression - 9Coach (Australia)
Patients who struggle with mental health can be good at hiding symptoms because they may fear what others think of them…. “Communication becomes problematic because the person is embarrassed to say how they feel, anticipating judgment,” Dr Raymond DePaulo, Jr, [co-director of the Mood Disorders Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine], explained to Everyday Health.

Most preclinical AD doesn't progress to dementia* (study) - MedPage Today
This "methodologically sound study" provides "hope to most with preclinical Alzheimer's that they might live dementia-free even when very old," observed Constantine Lyketsos, MD, MHS, of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, who was not involved in the study. "What's encouraging here is that people with preclinical Alzheimer's are not destined to develop dementia," Lyketsos told MedPage Today.

Pot holes - Washington Post
(Most neuroscientists don’t believe that LSD is addictive; its potential benefits are being studied at Johns Hopkins and New York University, among other places.)

Yes, you can inherit depression — here’s what that means if you're struggling – Prevention
“Depression is absolutely heritable. It runs in families,” says Shizhong Han, PhD, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Any given person with no family history has about a 10 percent risk of developing depression. But if your parents or siblings have the condition? That number spikes to 20 or 30 percent, notes Han.

This will change your mind about psychedelic drugs - Time
The very first study in the modern era of psychedelic research, of any importance, was a 2006 study done at Johns Hopkins by a scientist named Roland Griffiths, a very prominent drug-abuse scientist. He found that what the psychedelics did in about 80% of cases was induce a mystical experience.

Michael Pollan on testing psychedelics as a treatment for depression - CBS News
"I tried psilocybin," he said. "I was very interested in duplicating the research that was going on at Johns Hopkins and NYU. I had a guided psilocybin trip – it was underground because I didn't qualify for any of the trials – and I worked with a guy who was very talented, very professional.

My adventures with the trip doctors - New York Times
Bill Richards, clinical director of the psychedelics-research program at Johns Hopkins and the author of “Sacred Knowledge: Psychedelics and Religious Experiences,” is one of the few surviving links between the first and second waves of sanctioned psychedelic research in America.

7 myths about treating mental illness we need to shut down ASAP – Bustle
[M]ost people can't manage their mental illness via exercise alone. Jennifer Payne, associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine told Tonic that exercise can do a lot of good for people with various mental health conditions, but it's rarely a stand-alone treatment for someone with a full blown mental health disorder. 

Why kids and teens may face far more anxiety these days - Washington Post
“With (social media), it's all about the self-image — who's 'liking' them, who's watching them, who clicked on their picture,” said Marco Grados, associate professor of psychiatry and clinical director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Hospital. “Everything can turn into something negative ... [K]ids are exposed to that day after day, and it's not good for them.”

Depression, memory and small vessel disease intertwine in seniors (study) - MedPage Today
"Evidence is strong that depression is clearly a brain disorder that affects cognitive and emotional functioning through myriad processes, including vascular and inflammatory processes as well as the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, to name a few," added Jin Hui Joo, MD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, who was not involved in the study.

First, marijuana. Are magic mushrooms next? - Daily Beast
[E]fforts to legitimize hallucinogenic mushrooms come at a time of renewed interest in the potential mental health benefits of psychedelics, including mushrooms, LSD and MDMA (known as ecstasy). Two small studies published in 2016 by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and New York University found that a single large dose of psilocybin, combined with psychotherapy, helped relieve depression and anxiety in cancer patients.

Why you eat more at night — and how to curb your hunger (study) - NBC News
“During the daylight [in hunter-gatherer days], it would have made more sense to prioritize going out to hunt or forage for food. When it was dark, it made more sense to stay close to home and eat,” says lead study author Susan Carnell, PhD, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

A psychiatrist’s defense of Tully, a controversial new movie about postpartum struggles – Vox
The psychiatrist doing the defending is Dr. Lauren M. Osborne, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She also is an expert on the diagnosis and treatment of mood and anxiety disorders during pregnancy.

The first diagnosis of autism (audio) - BBC
James Harris, a Johns Hopkins professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, talks about his mentor, Leo Kanner, who was a pioneering child psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins and who diagnosed autism in the 1940s.   

April

Are psychedelics the answer to depression and addiction? – Salon
Roland] Griffiths ... a leading Professor of Psychology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Maryland, one of the best academic institutions in the world ... applied to conduct the very first clinical trial on a psychedelic since the ban a whole generation before. He wanted to give psilocybin, a naturally occurring chemical found inside “magic” mushrooms, to “respectable” citizens who had never used it before, to see if they would have a mystical experience — and to discover what the longer-term consequences, if any, would be.

Are psychedelics the answer to depression and addiction? – Salon
Roland] Griffiths ... a leading Professor of Psychology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Maryland, one of the best academic institutions in the world ... applied to conduct the very first clinical trial on a psychedelic since the ban a whole generation before. He wanted to give psilocybin, a naturally occurring chemical found inside “magic” mushrooms, to “respectable” citizens who had never used it before, to see if they would have a mystical experience — and to discover what the longer-term consequences, if any, would be.

The funeral director's opioid scare mission: Can fear help stop addiction? -The Guardian
“Scared straight comes from a good place, because I think a lot of times family members and friends just feel desperate and they are trying to make a big impact,” says Kelly Dunn, an associate professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. “But they don’t realize that perhaps it’s not a moral weakness or personality – a choice.”

75 Years After First LSD Trip, Psychedelic Science is Making a Comeback - Seeker
All that work finally seems to be paying off as psychedelics, including LSD, are experiencing a full-blown research renaissance. The tipping point came in 2006 with an article published by Roland Griffiths, a respected psychopharmacologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, which showed that a single dose of psilocybin — also first isolated by Albert Hofmann from psychoactive mushrooms in Mexico — can trigger “mystical experiences” that have a lasting positive psychological effect.

The good, the bad, and the maybe, about kratom - Healio
Jack E. Henningfield, PhD, is an adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University and vice president for research, health policy and abuse liability at Pinney Associates, told Healio Family Medicine FDA regulation on kratom is “vital” and that regulation of the substance as a dietary supplement was a viable approach to keep kratom available with some regulatory oversite.

Why does it take so long to diagnose bipolar disorder? - NBC News
Stigma makes it even more difficult for people to get help. “The average length of time between a person’s first episode and getting the correct diagnosis is eight years,” said Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and author of “Touched with Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament.” “That’s a very large chunk of life given that bipolar disorder most often hits in late adolescence or in the early 20s,” Jamison said.

What is bipolar II? (video) – WTTG-TV (D.C.)
Erica Richards, M.D., Ph.D., chair and medical director of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Sibley Memorial Hospital, explains bipolar 2, which singer Mariah Carey has just announced she suffers from. Richards also discusses treating and managing the disorder

Mariah Carey says she has bipolar disorder (video) - WUSA-TV (D.C.)
Erica Richards, M.D., Ph.D., chair and medical director of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Sibley Memorial Hospital, defines bipolar disorder and explains the difference between bipolar 1 and bipolar 2. She also encourages people who think they might be bipolar to start a conversation with their medical care provider.

New Alzheimer's definition and the clinician* - MedPage Today
Kostas Lyketsos, MD, MHS, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medicine, was among the top Alzheimer's specialists invited to discuss [for this article] the new definition and the issues it raises.

Opioid addiction treatment with medicine works best. Why don't more young people get it? - Philadelphia Inquirer
Young opioid users often have other mental-health issues, and many abuse other substances, as well. “They are a chaotic population,” said Marc Fishman, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and medical director of the Maryland Treatment Centers and Mountain Manor Treatment in Baltimore. “They [think they] are invincible. They’re not well-engaged in treatment of any kind.”

We’re beginning to learn how moms’ antidepressants can affect fetuses (study) - Vox
According to Lauren Osborne, the assistant director of Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center, who has analyzed the research, most studies compare depressed pregnant women who were taking antidepressants to healthy pregnant women — so there may be more that differs between the two groups than just the use of antidepressants.

Emmitsburg woman successfully treats depression through a little-known treatment - Frederick News-Post
[T]he little-known therapy [transcranial magnetic stimulation] is heralded by many psychiatrists as one of the most effective ways of treating depression in patients who show resistance to medications. “In our clinical experience, we’re seeing response rates of 50 to 60 percent and remission rates of 30 to 40 percent,” said Dr. Irving Reti, a psychiatrist and director of the Brain Stimulation Program at Johns Hopkins University.

Many people taking antidepressants discover they cannot quit - New York Times
“What you see is the number of long-term users just piling up year after year,” said Dr. Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University. Dr. Olfson and Dr. Ramin Mojtabai, a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University, assisted The Times with the analysis.​

March

7 Xanax side effects you should know about - Women’s Health
“If [Xanax is] taken regularly, even for a matter of weeks, it can be problematic to stop cold-turkey,” says Joseph Bienvenu, MD, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The science behind nervous sweating and how to put an end to it - Health24
“Involuntary sweating is like your body betraying you,” says Dr Carisa Perry-Parrish, a psychologist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Sweat Disorders in Baltimore. We want to appear confident, but our bodies scream, “I cannot do this!” Then we go from sweating because we’re stressed to stressing because we’re sweating, says Perry-Parrish.

New grant allows local treatment center to pair physical health and substance abuse services - Frederick News-Post
Diabetes, asthma, heart disease and high blood pressure are frequently seen among clients who enter the [substance abuse treatment] program. Infections such as HIV and hepatitis are also experienced frequently by intravenous drug users, said Dr. Kenneth Stoller, a psychiatrist and the director of the Johns Hopkins Broadway Center for Addiction.

Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders: Redefining postpartum depression -  MD magazine
Lauren M. Osborne, MD, assistant director of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, is an expert in the diagnosis and treatment of mood and anxiety disorders during pregnancy and postpartum....  “It’s an enormous transition from being a free person to being a person with a child,” Osborne said. “The biggest risk factor for developing postpartum depression is depression during pregnancy, but other risk factors are poor social support … adverse life events, and lack of sleep.”

If you’ve met aliens while on DMT, these scientists would like to hear from you (study) – Vice
The prestigious medical university at Johns Hopkins wants to know if you’ve ever taken so much dimethyltryptamine (DMT) that you’ve broken through reality and met the benevolent machine elves that live in the center of the universe. Researcher Roland R. Griffiths is the neuroscientist in charge of the study and he’s been on the forefront of scientific research into psychedelic experiences for decades.

A brush with madness (video) - CBS News
"Study after study after study has shown that there is a disproportionate rate of mood disorders, in particular, in highly-creative people," said Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, [who] is considered a leading expert on mood disorders in artists.

Enhanced privacy for substance abuse patients under debate again in Congress - Modern Healthcare
Dr. Eric Strain, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research at Johns Hopkins, testified on behalf of the Mullin bill, noting that even though providers may often know from their patients that they been through addiction treatment, they can still be hamstrung by not knowing what that treatment was.​

Ageism in Medicine Must Stop, Experts Say – Medscape (sign in required to view)
An article based on Susan Lehmann-led session on Ageism in Medical Education at the recent meeting of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry(AAGP).

LSD alters the neural response to music in a number of brain regions, study finds – PsyPost
New research illuminates how the psychedelic drug LSD changes our perception of music. The study found that LSD altered the neural response to music in brain regions associated with auditory processing, memory, emotion, and self-directed thought.... “​I have always been fascinated by emotion, memory, and altered states of consciousness.... ” said study author Frederick Barrett of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Lurasidone (Latuda) gets FDA nod for bipolar depression in kids* Medscape
"We know that children who have been diagnosed with bipolar depression can be at risk for poor school performance and impairments in social functioning. The FDA approval of this medicine for the treatment of pediatric patients with bipolar depression is significant for several reasons," commented Robert Findling, MD, director of child and adolescent psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Also covered in Clinical Psychiatry News

Breast cancer incidence higher in women with schizophrenia (study) – Healio
“Because schizophrenia has been associated with lowered risks of many types of cancer, including colorectal cancer, malignant melanoma and prostate cancer, it has been hypothesized that the genetic factors involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia may be protective against cancer,” Chuanjun Zhuo, MD, PhD, department of psychiatric laboratory, Tianjin Medical University, China, and Patrick Todd Triplett, MD, department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, wrote. “However, the association between schizophrenia and breast cancer remains uncertain.”

Denver may get to vote on whether to make magic mushrooms legal - Colorado Public Radio
[Kevin Matthews, who helps lead the campaign and helped draft the initiative] points to a study by Johns Hopkins University that found psilocybin users dealing with cancer-related stress reported lasting positive effects one year later. A New York University study produced similar results.  

February

Targeting mental Illness won’t prevent mass shootings (Opinion) – Baltimore Sun
Op-Ed piece by part-time faculty member, Annette Hanson, M.D.

6 ways to prevent your smartphone from making you feel dumber - Oprah
Smartphones ... hamper our ability to recall things by overwhelming our mind with distractions, says Susan Lehmann, MD, clinical director of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "When you use these devices, you're often switching quickly between topics or conversations," she says. "That rapid change in focus can prevent an idea or thought from sufficiently registering in your memory."

Doctors voice concern about opioid addiction in women, and the impact on newborns - Tampa Bay Times
"Opiate use has historically been predominantly by men, but we’ve seen that gap narrow significantly in the past 10 years," said Dr. Kelly Dunn, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. Dunn is in Tampa Bay this week joining other doctors from Johns Hopkins and its local All Children’s pediatric hospital for a series of events titled "A Woman’s Journey."

FDA serotonin syndrome warning erroneous? (study) - Medscape
This study demonstrating a "low risk of serotonin syndrome with [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors] and [selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors] and the triptans is actually very important," Jennifer Payne, MD, director, Women's Mood Disorders Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, told Medscape Medical News. "Since both antidepressants and triptans are commonly used medications, knowing that there is a low risk of an adverse reaction is reassuring...." said Payne.

My eating disorder made me feel like a feminist fraud - Marie Claire
Several studies, including one from Johns Hopkins University, frame chewing and spitting as a symptom of anorexia, bulimia, and/or OSFED (Other Specified Feeding and Eating Disturbances), and suggest that it may be an indicator of disease severity.

Vaccines against addictive drugs push forward despite past failures - Chemical & Engineering News
Although interest from the pharmaceutical industry has been intermittent, experts in substance abuse treatment are guardedly hopeful. “The vaccines seem very promising, and they’re novel, providing a different mechanism to prevent substance abuse,” says Kelly E. Dunn, who studies opioid use disorders at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “But there is still a lot of work to do.”

Excessive alcohol use linked to early-onset dementia risk (study) – CNN
Although many studies have shown a strong association between excessive alcohol use and dementia, this study is unique in its findings about early-onset dementia, according to Dr. Kostas Lyketsos, a neuropsychiatry professor and director of the Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center who was not involved in the study. "That is rather unique," Lyketsos said. "It does remind us that alcoholics have shorter life expectancies.”

The perplexing semantics of anosognosia - Psychology Today
Is anosognosia [unawareness of illness] after stroke the same as anosognosia during psychosis? .... Dr. Solomon Snyder at Johns Hopkins, a renowned neuroscientist ... told me, "In my personal experience, a substantial number of psychiatric patients lack appreciation that they are disturbed and so merit the anosognosia designation.

Running away or righting the way: Is psilocybin a viable psychiatric treatment?- MD magazine
"[T]here are some leading institutions in the United States that are all about [this work],” [said Charles L. Raison, MD, director of Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies]. “If you look at the places that are doing psilocybin work, they are not second rate. They’re Yale, Johns Hopkins, the University of California at San Francisco, and NYU. These are top, top places....

ECT for self-injurious behavior in autism: A new indication - Psychiatric Times
ECT [electroconvulsive therapy] has been documented as nothing short of lifesaving for many children and young adults with autism spectrum disorder who were previously wholly incapacitated by SIB [self-injurious behavior], say the writers of this commentary. [Among them: Lee Elizabeth Wachtel, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.]

Why do so few docs have buprenorphine waivers? - MedPage Today
Even among doctors who have buprenorphine waivers, utilization is low. In a 2017 survey-based study, Kelly Dunn, MS, PhD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore saw physicians were concerned about not having enough time or resources to help patients with opioid addiction. "The research suggested that physicians either don't feel informed enough, or aren't comfortable with, the idea of prescribing," she said.

Post-Partum Depression: A Clinical, Not Legal, Issue – MedPage today
A nurse who called law enforcement on a patient out of concern that she could harm her newborn infant could be a sign of a wider problem related to provider education about post-partum depression, experts said.... "It's easy for us to vilify, and point to all the things that went wrong in that situation -- and there were many -- but it points to the fact that our frontline providers need more education in this area," Lauren Osborne, MD, assistant director of the Johns Hopkins Women's Mood Disorders Center in Baltimore, told MedPage Today.

Homeless. Addicted to heroin. About to give birth. - Mother Jones
Unlike many in her position, [Gina] DiStefano had a place to go. A sex worker had told her about the Center for Addiction and Pregnancy at Johns Hopkins, a hulking brick building on the outskirts of Baltimore. The center, known as CAP, is one of the few places in the country that offers pregnant drug users comprehensive support.

Experts provide tips on diagnosing, treating concussions - Healio
To help primary care physicians make accurate, timely diagnoses of concussions, Healio Family Medicine asked neurological, orthopedic, sports medicine and psychiatry experts to provide information on concussion symptoms, treatments, broaching the subject with patients, and more. Among the experts: Jennifer M. Coughlin MD, assistant professor, department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Depression course for teens gets high marks - Healthline
Dr. Karen Swartz, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, has developed a proactive way to get high school students thinking about the seriousness of depression.

8 questions to ask yourself if you think you might have a drinking problem - Women's Health
Does your social life revolve around alcohol? ... Women with a drinking problem tend to lose interest in hobbies or people they once enjoyed because they'd rather go where the alcohol is. “You’re planning your social life and your time around drinking,” says licensed clinical alcohol and drug counselor Beth Kane-Davidson, director of the Addiction Treatment Center at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland.

New hope for Alzheimer's sufferers (study) - AARP
Previous work with [deep brain stimulation] and Alzheimer’s led by the University of Toronto and Johns Hopkins Medicine focused on stimulating memory circuits. “We saw slower decline in some individuals,” notes Gwenn Smith, a neuropsychologist at Johns Hopkins and a coauthor of the study, and she says that an increase in brain metabolism over one year was observed.

January

Binge eating at night? Your hormones may be to blame  - New York Times
“There’s more opportunity to eat in the evening, but this study is showing that hormonal responses are setting them up to do this,” said Susan Carnell, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who was a first author of the study. It’s not clear whether these hormonal patterns precede and cause the binge eating behaviors or are conditioned by an individual’s eating habits, Dr. Carnell said.

Is brain stimulation the future of Alzheimer’s treatment? – Healthline
Deep brain stimulation is thought to affect the activity and interaction of neurons. In previous studies, said Gwenn Smith, PhD, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine, “deep brain stimulation not only increased brain metabolism in specific regions, but also increased the connections between them, what’s known as ‘functional connectivity.’”

Can pot cause hallucinations? Report of officers who allegedly ate edibles fuels debate - CBC (Canada)
Ryan Vandrey, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioural sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, says there have been very clear demonstrations and scientific studies proving [that marijuana can cause hallucinations]. "Folks tend to be more prone to have hallucinations if they have a family history of psychosis, but there have been cases, even one recently in my laboratory, where somebody without a family history of psychosis has had hallucinations following acute dosing with cannabis," he said. 

Citing deaths of lab monkeys, F.D.A. ends an addiction study - New York Times
Jack Henningfield, professor of behavioral biology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, disagreed with the decision to stop the study. “These studies are done to address really serious questions about the nature of tobacco addiction,” Dr. Henningfield said. ‘‘This is research in serious service to humanity.

Mixing magic mushrooms and meditation has long-term benefits, Johns Hopkins study finds - Big Think
[R]esearchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine wanted to see how “quantum change experiences” induced with the help of psilocybin (the psychoactive substance in magic mushrooms) combined with regular spiritual practices (like meditation, journaling, awareness) resulted in the overall well-being of healthy volunteers over the course of six months.

How daytime stress turns into nighttime snacking – Forbes
"Our findings suggest that evening is a high-risk time for overeating, especially if you're stressed and already prone to binge eating," says Susan Carnell, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the study's first author.

Education is a simple yet effective tool for teens fighting depression – Inverse
[R]esearchers from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore [have] created the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP), which marries student curriculums with training for health and school-based professionals in order to deliver a core message to the public: depression is a treatable medical illness and people should feel empowered to seek help.

Why evenings may be a dangerous time for dieters – HealthDay
The small study suggests that you're more likely to overeat in the evening -- especially if you're feeling stressed. "The good news is that having this knowledge, people could take steps to reduce their risk of overeating by eating earlier in the day, or finding alternative ways to deal with stress," said study lead researcher Susan Carnell. She's an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore.

Are new brands of strong coffee boosting heart palpitation risks? – Newsmax
"For the same amount of coffee [Black Insomnia vs. Starbucks], you will get double the amount of caffeine," said Mary Sweeney, who researches the effects of caffeine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. "This makes it easier to consume more caffeine than you intend to and effects can range from mild to severe, for example, jitteriness, nervousness, restlessness and trouble sleeping. The most serious effect would be cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat)."

The truth about electrical brain stimulation – Lifehacker
“You’re affecting large swaths of neurons that then have downstream effects in their relationship with other neuronal populations and networks, so where you place the electrodes is really critical,” says Tracy Vannorsdall, a neuropsychologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “We know that very small changes in the electrode montage—where we’re placing them on the brain—can have significant different effects in terms of cognitive outcomes.”

Self-report screening questionnaires overestimate prevalence of depression (analysis) - Healio
Jennifer L. Payne, MD, associate professor of psychiatry, and director, Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, describes the analysis as “a thoughtful discussion of the pros and cons of screening instruments for depression” and adds that “[t]he paper makes several important points including that screening instruments should not be used to estimate prevalence….”

Some health providers now treat depression with magnets instead of pharmaceuticals - North Bay Business Journal (Santa Rosa, Calif.)
[Transcranial magnetic stimulation] was first developed in 1985 and was approved by the FDA in 2008. Though not completely mainstream, the treatment is covered by most insurances and is used by the Mayo Clinic, the Johns Hopkins Brain Stimulation Program, and several clinics throughout the North Bay, including Brainefit, in Davis. 

Second Opinion: Eating Disorders - WXXI-TV
Using real-life medical cases, specialists grapple with diagnosis and treatment options to give patients and TV viewers up-to-date, accurate medical information. In this episode, Angela Guarda, M.D., director of the Eating Disorders Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital, is on a panel discussing eating disorders. View video

Expert Panel Unveils Recommendations for Home-Based Dementia Care (Press Release)
A panel of leading researchers and policy experts, funded by BrightFocus Foundation and led by Johns Hopkins University researchers, has released five key recommendations for public and private sector leaders to better support people with dementia living in their own home. The panel noted that the vast majority of people with dementia prefer to remain in their own home, and that home-based dementia care can be less costly to families and taxpayers than care provided through nursing homes or other long-term care facilities.

How opioids kill - Scientific American
When a person smokes, snorts or injects an opioid, the substance enters the bloodstream, then the brain. There it can act on mu-opioid receptors, says Eric Strain, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research at Johns Hopkins University. “Once the drug binds to those opioid receptors and activates them, it sets off a cascade of psychological and physical actions; it produces euphoric effects, but it also produces respiratory-depressing effects,” Strain says.

The Teenage Mental Health Crisis: Finding Meaning in Arts Education - WYPR-FM
Dr Karen Swartz, talk about this exchange and the things that can go right or wrong at a moment like this when a teenager comes to a parent with this sort of issue. "One of the biggest challenge parents have is not really understanding enough about depression to take it seriously. Given the choice between thinking well my child's having a hard time or they are having a little bit of a rough patch versus they have potentially a life-threatening illness, they're not going to chose the second. They want to think that they're ok and that it's going to pass with time. The average adult doesn't know much about depression and so, they're not recognizing the signs. [Joelle] just gave a beautiful description of so many of the symptoms that young people have, but you could right them all off. You could understand them all and that's the problem. The way we make a diagnosis is to look for those coming together and staying, but I would say most parents aren't armed with the information to say, 'Oh my goodness, this is the serious kind of depression.'"

Some health providers now treat depression with magnets instead of pharmaceuticals
North Bay Business Journal (Santa Rosa, Calif.)
[Transcranial magnetic stimulation] was first developed in 1985 and was approved by the FDA in 2008. Though not completely mainstream, the treatment is covered by most insurances and is used by the Mayo Clinic, the Johns Hopkins Brain Stimulation Program, and several clinics throughout the North Bay, including Brainefit, in Davis. 

People have spent centuries trying to prove caffeine is dangerous, but the science suggests otherwise – Quartz
If caffeine-use disorder became a recognized diagnosis, it would appear alongside opioid-use disorder, tobacco-use disorder, and other often-deadly addictions. This could “minimize the severity of other substance-use disorders,” says Maggie Sweeney, a psychiatry instructor at Johns Hopkins University

Regional and national acceptance of medical cannabis reaches historic highs - Chicago Tribune
Prestigious medical centers and teaching hospitals around the world and in the United States such as Johns Hopkins and other universities have received initial funding to begin baseline data collection on registered medical cannabis patients from around the country using medical marijuana to treat the symptoms associated with their qualifying medical conditions.

2017

December

Child sex dolls, the newest outlet for pedophiles, must be banned - The Hill
[E]emerging psychology on the topic says these obscene dolls encourage abuse of real children. Peter Fagan from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine recently told The Atlantic that child sex dolls likely have a “reinforcing effect” on pedophiles, and “in many instances cause [the urge] to be acted upon with greater urgency.”

Coping with seasonal depression (audio) - WYPR-FM
Today on Midday, ways to cope with grief, depression, and anxiety during the holidays. [Guests include] Dr. Mark Komrad, a senior supervising psychiatrist and Ethicist-in-Residence at Sheppard Pratt Hospital in Baltimore. He’s also a faculty member in the departments of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins and at the University of Maryland.

'Phenomenal' trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington's disease, experts say - Washington Post
The good news for Huntington's patients is the hope that the drug might even reverse the progression of the disease. “What's really interesting in animal studies, if you stop the production of the mutant protein, not only does progression stop, but the brain starts to heal itself,” said Christopher Ross, director of the Huntington's Disease Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine, who was not involved in the research. “Which means there might be improvement.”

Peter Thiel is betting on magic mushrooms to treat depression — and he's not the only one - Business Insider
Usona, a non-profit company based in Madison, Wisconsin, is also in the planning phases of studies of psilocybin for depression and anxiety. Its advisors include three American researchers who were involved in Clark Martin's clinical trial from Johns Hopkins University and New York University.

Hopkins cardiologist says love is more than a matter of the heart - Baltimore Sun Dr. Peter V. Rabins, a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is the author of “The Why of Things,” a 2013 exploration of causality in science and in life. “In this age of hookup apps, and with all the stuff about sexual harassment that has come out in the ...

Can Social Media Help Improve ADHD Treatments? – U.S. News and World Report
Dr. David W. Goodman, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the director of the Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Center of Maryland, calls the research “interesting and very sophisticated,” touting its ability “to parse out language” used on Twitter and yield high prediction rates when picking out ADHD individuals versus non-ADHD individuals.

This is a scientifically determined playlist for tripping - Inverse
The swelling soundscape surrounding you is the artistry of psychologist Bill Richards, Ph.D., who developed the playlist specifically for your psychedelic trip. Richards works with Roland Griffiths’s lab at Johns Hopkins University, where patients get more than just conventional medicine.

There Once Was a Girl: Against the false narratives of anorexia. - Slate
Though their effect is hard to quantify, “a lot of war stories and memoirs out there … glorify the specialness and suffering of anorexia,” says Dr. Angela Guarda, director of the Johns Hopkins Eating Disorders Program. “Anecdotally, patients often acknowledge that these writings romanticize the disorder,” and that “reading them can be triggering and worsen their ED.”

Fundraising stamps will benefit Alzheimer's disease research (video) - WBAL-TV
The United States Postal Service is doing its part to find a cure for Alzheimer's disease. Officials held a ceremony at Johns Hopkins [Bayview Medical Center] to unveil the Alzheimer's semi postal fund-raising stamp. It will benefit the Department of Health and Human Services and their efforts to find a cure

November

Mount Airy woman recognized at Alzheimer's awareness stamp dedication - Carroll Count Times
Thursday’s ceremony included comment from many, including Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center President Dr. Richard Bennett and Congressman Elijah Cummings, D-District 7.

USPS dedicates Alzheimer’s fundraising stamp - WCBD News 2
Postmaster General Megan J. Brennan dedicated a stamp today to fund research to help find a cure for one of the top 10 leading causes of death — Alzheimer’s. The first-day-of-issue dedication ceremony for the Alzheimer’s Semipostal Fundraising stamp took place at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore.

Redefining age (audio; 21:35) - WYPR-FM
[The show's host says to author Ann Kaiser Stearns]: You write that there's a learning curve to caregiving, and you quote Dr. Ray DePaulo, the former head of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medicine, about ways to avoid what you call "the catastrophic reaction."

Self-harm rises sharply among tween and young teen girls, study shows - Los Angeles Times
In a November 2016 study chronicling the rise in depression among young girls, a team led by Johns Hopkins psychiatrist Ramin Mojtabai noted that adolescent girls appear to be coming under increasing stress. As an example, Mojtabai and his team wrote that cyberbullying may have increased more dramatically among girls than boys.

What is ephebophilia? Some say attraction to teens is not the same as paedophilia - International Business Times
"The average man refrains from sex with a child not only because he's a moral person but also because a child does not tempt him sexually," said [Fred] Berlin, founder of the Sexual Disorders Clinic at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Ephebophilia is a condition in which a person is attracted not to prepubescent children but to children or adolescents around the time of puberty, basically teenagers. Most men can find adolescents attractive sexually, although, of course, that doesn't mean they're going to act on it."

A change of mind: Scientists are learning to predict psychosis years in advance — and possibly prevent -The Scientist
[W]hy does one person with these early signs develop psychosis and not another? Brain studies have yielded some clues. In healthy kids, "the brain dynamically changes" during adolescence, says Akira Sawa, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Why can’t Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford offer care for mentally ill kids? - San Jose Mercury News
Model inpatient youth psychiatric care is provided at other U.S. hospitals, including Johns Hopkins, which delivers inpatient diagnosis and treatment for ages 5 to 17.

The U.S. Postal Service is taking on Alzheimer’s with a new stamp - Washington Post
The first-class stamp, which shows someone placing a hand on the shoulder of an elderly woman, hints at the hope and companionship that caregivers, researchers and an aware public can bring.... The stamp will be dedicated at a ceremony at the Memory & Alzheimer’s Treatment Center at Johns Hopkins’s Bayview campus in Baltimore on Nov. 30.

This doctor might have the answer to the fentanyl crisis - Vancouver magazine
The last five or so years have seen a resurgence of clinical interest in psychedelics — the old hippie drugs that can open what Johns Hopkins psychologist Roland Griffiths calls a “spiritual window” through which deep insight might flow.

Why powerful men make women watch them masturbate - San Diego Union-Tribune
Driven by strong, recurrent sexual urges, exhibitionists act on a self-deceptive fantasy that the witness might enjoy the experience, said Frederick Berlin, the director of the Sex and Gender Clinic at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. When the witness responds negatively, the exhibitionist often feels intense regret, shame and self-disgust, said Berlin, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.​

How caring for a sick pet can raise your risk of depression - U.S. News & World Report
Caring for a sick pet has many parallels with providing care to human loved one, says Dr. Susan W. Lehmann, clinical director of the division of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry and director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Day Hospital at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

October

Monthly shot for opioid addiction might be as effective as daily medication - Healthline News
“One of the biggest risk factors for people when they detox is that in the 30 days after, they are no longer physically dependent on opiates. They have a very high risk of relapsing to opiates,” Kelly Dunn, PhD, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine, told Healthline.

The Most Lethal Means: Guns and Suicide – WYPR
Paul Nestadt, MD, postdoctoral fellow, is interviewed.  His recent research paper compares urban and rural suicide rates in Maryland. Ramin Mojtabai, MD and Patrick Triplett are also authors on that paper. 

How to talk to kids about the deadly New York City truck attack - ABC News
Joan Kaufman, a professor of psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, said having conversations about Tuesday’s attack with children of all ages -- including as young as preschool -- is a must for parents. “There might be the feeling they want to protect their kids and not talk to them about it, but children are going to find out,” she said. “It’s better if information about the event comes from the parents.”

The caffeine 'detox': How and why to cut back on your daily fix - CNN
"Caffeine is the most commonly consumed psychoactive drug," said Mary M. Sweeney, an instructor who researches caffeine's effects on individuals in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "When we consume caffeine, it has positive effects on mood and alertness, and people like these beneficial effects."

Why we all have clutter and how to get rid of it - Psych Central
I do not feel equipped to give advice here when I’m tripping over piles of books on the floor of my bedroom. But I like the behavioral tips offered by Dr. Gerald Nestadt, director of the Johns Hopkins OCD clinic, in an issue of The Johns Hopkins Depression & Anxiety Bulletin.

Betty Jarratt, psychiatric liaison at Hopkins Hospital - Baltimore Sun
Betty Jarratt, a former psychiatric liaison at Johns Hopkins Hospital … died Thursday of respiratory failure at The Cedars, a Portland, Maine, retirement community. She was 94…. After Ms. Jarratt was divorced in 1966, she moved to Baltimore when she was selected by Hopkins Hospital to work with Dr. Joel Elkes, a noted expert on brain chemistry and early psychiatric drugs.

Will psychedelic therapy transform mental health care? - NBC News
In 2016 … a Johns Hopkins study and a concurrent New York University study found that about 80 percent of cancer patients showed clinically significant decreases in depressed mood and anxiety even six months after receiving one to two psilocybin treatments.

September

You can't cure depression by working out – Vice
"People experience anxiety, no doubt about it, but [most] don't have an anxiety disorder," says Jennifer Payne, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. "Yoga is fabulous and can be great for anxiety, but it's not going to cure an anxiety disorder."

Interrupted sleep can prevent slow wave sleep and wreck your mood  -Today
“When sleep is disrupted several times during the night you may never get to slow wave sleep,” explains the study’s lead author, Patrick Finan, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. And that, Finan says, may be what makes all the difference in a person’s mood the next day.

Parental age ups rate of new mutations passed to children  - Spectrum
The findings provide one possible explanation for the increased risk of autism among children born to older parents. But it is still unclear how much of the risk the increased mutation rate explains, says Daniel Weinberger, professor of psychiatry, neurology and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, who was not involved in the study.

Matter of Fact: State of Addiction (video; 33:28) - WBAL-TV
This primetime, one-hour special that addresses America's opioid epidemic includes the story of a Baltimore heroin user who has been treated at, among other places, Johns Hopkins’ Broadway Center for Addiction. A woman who has been supportive of his recovery treatment says the Broadway Center “has really taken the time to diagnose him and treat him as a person.”

Psychiatric services from pages to practice (audio; 9:15) - Psychiatric Services
The hosts of this podcast discuss a recent report by Stanislav Spivak, medical director, Johns Hopkins’ Mobile Treatment Services of Community Psychiatry, on the effects of direct-to-consumer advertising on medication adherence.

America’s Opioid Epidemic - Search for Solutions – The Hill
A panel discussion featuring Ken Stoller, M.D. Director of the JH Broadway Center for Addiction

Changing the dialogue about mental illness in black community - Afro American
Resources are available. Maryland boasts a higher doctor to patient ratio than the national average. Organizations like The Simon Life and Wellness Center and All Walks of Life, among others, cater to Baltimore’s underserved populations. Inpatient and outpatient programs that accept Medicaid are available at Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Maryland Medical Center.

Alzheimer’s linked to low brain chemical count​ - National Enquirer
Research carried out by Gwenn Smith, a psychiatry professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, examined the levels of serotonin in the brains of 56 participants.... Scans found participants with [mild cognitive impairment] had up to 38 percent less serotonin than healthy participants of the same age. The findings suggest the brain chemical may drive the illness rather than simply being its by-product.

2 scientists are locked in a race to develop a groundbreaking vaccine for heroin, but it might not be a 'magic bullet' - Business Insider
While the Obama administration made administrative changes to increase the number of prescribers administering buprenorphine last year, a study conducted by the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine earlier this year found that only 44% of physicians who had obtained a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine were doing so at full capacity.

Hobart man seeks 'chemical castration' instead of prison time - Chicago Tribune
[Michael] Bessigano asked that the court consider the time he's spent incarcerated and release him on the condition that he undergoes chemical hormone treatments using the drug Depo-Lupron, that would reduce his testosterone levels.... Fred Berlin, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, evaluated Bessigano during a July interview and wrote in a letter that the hormone treatment could prove effective.

The Secret To Chronic Happiness As You Age - Kaiser Health News
“You have to be willing to accept your new reality — and move forward,” said Dr. Susan Lehmann, director of the geriatric psychiatry day program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “Aim to have the best life you can at where you are right now.”

August

Helping children exposed to trauma recover (audio) - KJZZ-FM (Tempe, Ariz.)
How do violent and traumatic experiences in childhood affect ... kids [in war-torn areas] as they grow up, and how can experts help them? With me to help answer those questions is Dr. Carolina Vidal. She's an assistant professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University, specializing in child and adolescent psychiatry.

Research into marijuana benefits for vets with PTSD in danger of shutdown - Military Times
[The study] has faced numerous problems. Getting federal approval took five years. Officials at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland withdrew from the study shortly after its formal start, leaving [the principal investigator] with a single Arizona site to monitor participants.

California moves to become the first US state to legalise magic mushrooms - International Business Times (U.K.)
Psilocybin is considered a Schedule I drug by the California Controlled Substances Act and the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Drugs in this ranking have no accepted medical use and a high potential for dependence and abuse, according to the DEA.... However, a New York University study and a Johns Hopkins University research paper published late last year found that psilocybin helped ease anxiety and depression for some cancer patients.

Going deep with psychedelic therapy - Vice
Two years ago, after reading about a study carried out by Johns Hopkins University, which showed that psilocybin had an 80 percent success rate in smoking cessation, I decided to try it out for myself. With ... a handful of freshly picked magic mushrooms, I achieved in an afternoon what years of painful attempts to go cold turkey and abortive nicotine replacement courses had failed to do. I haven't touched – or even thought about – cigarettes since.

VA roadblock hinders study on cannabis as PTSD treatment for veterans, researcher says - The Cannabist (via Denver Post)
The study [to treat post-traumatic stress disorder] moved forward under MAPS [Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies], and after receiving funding from Colorado, Johns Hopkins University joined the study in September 2015. However, in March the Baltimore university pulled out of the study without enrolling any veterans.... [A] dispute reportedly arose over federal drug policy, and whether to openly challenge federal rules on medical cannabis research.

Ecstasy could be ‘breakthrough’ therapy for soldiers, others suffering from PTSD - Washington Post
The next step was investigating MDMA’s effects on people. [Rick] Doblin again raised money to fly psychedelic users he had befriended to Stanford University and Johns Hopkins University for spinal taps. The studies were approved by review boards at both institutions.

How to lose weight? Get your brain under control - Boston Globe
“If you have an overweight mother, you’re more likely to become obese,” said Susan Carnell, the study’s author and an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. “We were trying to see if there’s something different about the brain in students with a high risk of becoming obese later in life.”

Guns Play Oversize Role in Rural Suicides – New York Times
“Patients with mental health issues should be assessed for gun availability,” said the lead author, Dr. Paul S. Nestadt, a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins. “We give out condoms and clean needles to people at risk for H.I.V. Why not give out trigger locks to family members of patients at risk for suicide?”
Also covered by Kaiser Health News and Healthline

Montel Williams Shares His MS Treatment Story – WUSA
Features Dr. Adam Kaplin talking about depression in MS.

Researchers leverage PET and MR to uncover serotonin's role in Alzheimer's - Dotmed
“The study shows that the serotonin system is affected in the early stages before memory problems are severe enough to meet criteria for dementia,” Dr. Gwenn Smith, professor and director of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry at the university, told HCB News. “We hope the study will stimulate development of medications targeting the serotonin system for use in individuals at risk for dementia.”

Scans show lower brain serotonin levels linked to dementia - United Press International
Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that lower levels of serotonin transporter in the brain are linked to dementia. Serotonin transporter is the brain chemical responsible for appetite, sleep and mood.... Researchers examined brain scans of patients with early signs of memory decline and found that lower serotonin transporters may be the driving force of dementia, not a byproduct.
Also reported by: Yahoo News

Humanities in Healthcare - WYPR
How can the humanities be used to help doctors provide better care for their patients? Meg Chisolm, Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Education in the department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine, spoke about the BEAM (Bedside Education in the Art of Medicine) initiative (@BedEdArtMed).

Weed and depression: Does marijuana make for depressed brains? - U.S. News & World Report
While there is substantive evidence that pot increases the risk of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, the link to depression is unclear. “If there is an association, the data are not as robust as with psychotic illness. It’s just conjecture,” says Dr. Eric C. Strain, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins.

Psychedelic drugs saved my life. So why aren't they prescribed? - Wired
Roland Griffiths, a professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland, has likened psychedelics' ability to bring about neural rerouting as akin to a "surgical intervention."

When addiction treatment means decades on Methadone – WYPR On Point
…according to Ken Stoller, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Hospital who specializes in addiction psychiatry. For example, he said when Methadone is prescribed properly, there are no real long-term health risks — no more than there might be side effects with any medication. “This is one area of medicine where it seems like there’s more focus on opinion or philosophy as opposed to the science because the science is really, really clear on this,” Stoller said.

'I suffered from an eating disorder you've probably never heard of before' - Women's Health
Several studies ... including one from Johns Hopkins University, have identified [chewing and spitting] as a common behavior in individuals with anorexia, bulimia, and/or other eating disorders, and have suggested it may be a marker of disorder severity.

New Yorker shares tools he’s developed to overcome chronic pain in new book - am New York
[Jim] Curtis defines a “stimulati” as someone who “ignites passion, thought and wellness.” After 20 years seeking out everything from reiki to acupuncture to cryotherapy to treat his pain, he found his own stimulati. They include ... Adam Kaplin, a psychiatrist affiliated with Johns Hopkins Hospital, with whom Curtis created the anxiety-tracking app Mood 24/7, and career coach Denise Spatafora.

July

As dozens more report blackouts at Mexico resorts, country says it will act on tainted alcohol -Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Matthew Johnson, an associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, has no direct evidence, but the stories [about tainted alcohol] point to several likely possibilities: scopolamine, phencyclidine (better known as PCP) or methaqualone (quaaludes, a drug popular in the 1970s). Based on the many accounts vacationers described, any of those drugs seems to make sense, said Johnson, a specialist in behavioral pharmacology.
Also reported by: USA Today

How to improve your memory and brain health - AARP​
“The GCBH [Global Council on Brain Health] recommends people incorporate cognitively stimulating activities into their lifestyle to help maintain their brain health as they age,” says Marilyn Albert, chair of GBCH and director of the Division of Cognitive Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “The sooner you start, the better because what you do now may make you less susceptible to disease-related brain changes later in life.”

In the context of the opioid crisis, doctors discuss the future of chronic pain treatment - KPCC-FM (Los Angeles)
Against the backdrop of the opioid crisis, we sit down with three doctors to explore the rise of opiates, and how pain treatment can move past them.… Among the guests: Michael Clark, M.D., vice chair for clinical affairs and director of the pain treatment program in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Psychedelics like shrooms could address depression in a way that's fundamentally different from prescription drugs - Business Insider
[The] shrinking of the sense of self has been linked with long-lasting shifts in perspective — changes that appear to be related to a reduction in symptoms of depression and anxiety. That’s according to clinical trials of magic mushrooms’ active ingredient, psilocybin, in cancer patients at Johns Hopkins and New York University.

Challenging intake guidelines with Dr Graham Redgrave - The Eating Disorder Recovery Podcast 
Tabitha Farrar talks to Dr Graham Redgrave about the research done at Johns Hopkins looking into higher weights and a faster rate of refeeding patients with anorexia in an inpatient hospital setting. 

Are movies about eating disorders fundamentally uncinematic? - Pacific Standard magazine
[Dr. Angela Guarda, director of the Eating Disorders Program at the Johns Hopkins University, says] that filmmakers could emphasize that one recovers from an eating disorder — as most do — through treatment that helps patients create healthy eating habits.... She says that films would do well to also include plots where loved ones encourage a sufferer to get help, providing an audience with practical, helpful information.

Drug testing at raves & festivals could save lives - The Fix
“People would be safest not taking any street drugs at all, but if free, no-fault testing can reduce deaths and other catastrophic consequences, it may be a service worth having,” said Matthew Johnson, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Keith Conners, psychologist who set standard for diagnosing A.D.H.D., dies at 84 - New York Times
The field of child psychiatry was itself still young when Dr. Conners joined the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the early 1960s as a clinical psychologist.... Dr. Conners focused on a group of youngsters who were chronically restless, hyperactive and sometimes aggressive.

Clinical trial examines tramadol to treat opioid withdrawal - United Press International
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found the drug tramadol, when combined with other therapies, may be effective for treating opioid withdrawal. The results of the clinical trial, published in JAMA Psychiatry, showed tramadol extended-release suppressed withdrawal symptoms more than clonidine and was similar to buprenorphine, both drugs commonly used in opioid withdrawal.
Study also highlighted in NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research website and newsletter.

Can psychoactive drugs help ministers be more effective? University researchers aim to find out - Christian Today
Pastors and priests are taking drugs – but it's all in the name of science. Scientists at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore have enlisted two dozen religious leaders for a study in which they are given two doses of psilocybin, the active ingredient in 'magic mushrooms'. The idea is to see how a transcendental experience affects religious thinking and whether it makes them more effective in their work, according to The Guardian.
Also reported by: Scientific American

What happens when a rabbi, a priest and twenty two other religious leaders get high on magic mushrooms? - Daily Mail (U.K.)
Religious leaders are taking a psychedelic drug to study its effect on religious experience. Scientists have recruited 24 religious leaders from different faiths and practices to participate in the ongoing study at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. The participants, who are anonymous, will be given doses of psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms.
Also reported by: The Guardian (U.K.)

Surprise: A large share of ‘Molly’ brought to music festivals doesn’t actually contain MDMA, Hopkins researchers say - Baltimore Fishbowl
A medical research team from the school, led by psychiatry and behavioral sciences professor Matthew Johnson, partnered up on a study with the nonprofit DanceSafe, which tested samples of concertgoers’ drugs for free (and without penalty) from July 2010 through July 2015.

The robot sex doll revolution may have some big downsides, experts warn - Vice
There’s no evidence to suggest that these dolls really help anybody, and experts are unconvinced. In fact, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine paraphilia researcher Peter Fagan told the Atlantic in 2016 that childlike sex dolls would likely lead would-be pedophiles to act upon their urges “with greater urgency.”

The fine art of mental illness: What paintings tell us about someone’s psyche - Washington Post and numerous subscribers
James C. Harris, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral science and director of Johns Hopkins University’s Developmental Neuropsychiatry Clinic, spent more than a decade writing monthly essays that connect the visual arts to larger issues of psychiatry and mental illness. Now, those essays and the art that inspired them have been collected by the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

My Time: Lecture combines clinical research with powerful personal narratives - Baltimore Sun
Around 80 people, many of whom are clinical professionals, attended the lecture hosted by Chesapeake Life Center and held May 3 at the Meeting House in Columbia. The first speaker, Dr. D. Andrew Tompkins, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, shared his research on opioid use disorders and their treatments. Also reported by: Capital Gazette

June

Here's how much Fitbit users sleep - PC magazine
"These findings further support the general recommendation that most adults need to consistently sleep 7 to 9 hours per night, and illustrate why a good night's rest is so important for your overall well-being," Fitbit advisory panel sleep expert Michael T. Smith, Jr., Ph.D., professor of psychiatry, neurology, and nursing at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in a statement.

How People With Dementia Can Live at Home Longer – Next Avenue
The MIND program makes a difference, saving money for families and Medicaid
Quincy Samus, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins who leads the MIND at Home research team, is conducting two more studies of the program. One, through a $6.4 million innovation grant from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, focuses on low-income older adults and their caregivers. The other, funded with $3.4 million from the National Institute on Aging, looks at participants of all income levels. Both studies will gain insight into the program’s costs and long-term sustainability. Combined, they involve 647 people with dementia and an equal number of family members in central Maryland.

How people with dementia can live at home longer - Forbes
[The Gerben family] got a boost from a program in Maryland called Maximizing Independence (MIND) at Home. [It was] designed in 2006 by dementia specialists at Johns Hopkins University and offered to families as part of Johns Hopkins research that is still ongoing.

What a ‘transcendent experience’ really means - New York magazine
[O]ne day in 2008, [Janeen Delaney] learned about a study at Johns Hopkins University looking at people facing imminent death. The research team, led by psychiatrist Roland Griffiths, wanted to know whether having a major transcendent experience — induced by psilocybin, the active ingredient in so-called magic mushrooms — would help people like Janeen face death with peace rather than despair.... Janeen signed up.

Alzheimer's patients need special care, but providers aren't ready to give it - Healthcare Dive
Older people with Alzheimer’s have twice as many hospital stays per year as other older Americans…. “People with Alzheimer’s really need a lot of care,” Dr. Kostas Lyketsos, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine, told Healthcare Dive.

9 things to consider when your antidepressant poops out - Everyday Health
Rule out noncompliance. This seems like a no-brainer, but according to Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D., a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the biggest challenge professionals face in treating bipolar disorder ... is medical adherence. Approximately 40 to 45 percent of bipolar patients do not take their medications as prescribed.

After Mission bust, hemp oil producer to make no-THC products for Kansas - Kansas City Star
Ryan Vandrey, a psychiatry professor at Johns Hopkins University who has studied the effects of cannabis, said it’s hard to pin down how much low-THC hemp oil one would have to consume to have a psychoactive effect. But he said it’s a lot, and most law enforcement agencies haven’t done much to crack down on it, in part because “the hemp law is a little bit confusing.”

Caffeine is a silent performance killer - Huffington Post
New research from Johns Hopkins shows that performance increases due to caffeine intake are the result of caffeine drinkers experiencing a short-term reversal of caffeine withdrawal. By controlling for caffeine use in study participants, Johns Hopkins researchers found that caffeine-related performance improvement is nonexistent without caffeine withdrawal.

The new way to prevent anxiety in kids - Time
Researchers at the University of Connecticut and Johns Hopkins University tested an eight-week therapy for healthy kids who each had at least one parent with an anxiety disorder. During the following year, 31% of kids who didn’t receive the therapy developed an anxiety disorder, whereas only 5% of kids who received treatment developed one.

The VA admits pot could help veterans, but doctors still can't prescribe medical marijuana - Circa
In March, Johns Hopkins University pulled out of a marijuana PTSD study due to a dispute over federal drug policy and whether to challenge federal rules requiring researchers to only use medical cannabis grown by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Michael Phelps added to Medibio board of directors - Swimming World
According to a press release put out by Medibio, an evidence-based medical technology company located in Australia, Michael Phelps has been added to the organization’s Board of Directors.... Medibio’s depression diagnostic is being validated in clinical studies undertaken by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and The University of Ottawa, among others.

May

Seniors and depression: Not a normal part of aging - U.S. News & World Report
Dr. Susan W. Lehmann, clinical director of the division of geriatric psychiatry and neuropsychiatry and director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Day Hospital at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: “Depression is never considered a normal part of aging,” she says. “While the more of life we live, the more likely we are to experience times of sadness and grief related to loss or change, most people handle these life challenges without developing a persistent depressive disorder.”

The long, hard road to a science of bad drug trips - Motherboard/Vice
[The] renewed interest in psychedelic harm reduction has increasingly attracted individual researchers running psychedelic studies at various research institutions around the world. At the forefront of these psychedelic studies is Johns Hopkins University, which has been pioneering research into the therapeutic potential of psilocybin, the psychoactive component of magic mushrooms, for the last few years.

Alcohol and depression: A risky combination - U.S. News & World Report
[H]aving a mental illness makes treating substance dependence much more difficult. “The dilemma for those with depression is that a drug that produces a transient elevation of mood may make the person think, 'This is helpful,'” says Dr. Eric C. Strain, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University.

Adult ADHD can't be diagnosed with a simple screening test, doctors warn​ (audio) - NPR and numerous subscribers
Dr. David Goodman, an ADHD specialist at Johns Hopkins University and the Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Center of Maryland, [says] that not everyone who experiences the symptoms of ADHD necessarily suffers from the disorder, and that a simple screening test cannot diagnose it.​​

Magic mushrooms might be the "safest" recreational drug, but they're still risky - Mashable
Two recent studies at New York University and Johns Hopkins University found that psilocybin — a key compound in the mushrooms — has promising therapeutic benefits for people with depression. Proponents are seeking to legalize mushrooms for use in controlled, medical settings.

Bipolar disorder dating tips - Teen Vogue
According to Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who both has and studies bipolar illness, the average age of onset is around 22. But some people experience symptoms earlier — right about when they are starting to date.

Magic mushrooms might be the "safest" recreational drug, but they're still risky - Mashable
Two recent studies at New York University and Johns Hopkins University found that psilocybin — a key compound in the mushrooms — has promising therapeutic benefits for people with depression. Proponents are seeking to legalize mushrooms for use in controlled, medical settings.

The truth about 'Blue Whale,' an online game that tells teens to self-harm - Motherboard
Dr. Shannon Barnett, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told Motherboard in an email that while this game exemplifies the risk of someone taking advantage of youth who are emotionally distressed, there is no one reason for adolescents to feel so bad that they have suicidal thoughts and/or thoughts of harming themselves.

Bipolar disorder dating tips - Teen Vogue
According to Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who both has and studies bipolar illness, the average age of onset is around 22. But some people experience symptoms earlier — right about when they are starting to date.

Sex workers who use LSD have lower suicide risk, study finds - The Globe and Mail (Canada)
There is a growing body of research into the benefits of psychedelic drugs. In 2014, researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore reported that some long-time smokers who had failed many attempts to quit did so successfully while receiving magic mushrooms, in the context of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment program. 

This is how much caffeine it takes to kill an average person - USA Today and numerous affiliates
[T]he limit varies from person to person, says Maggie Sweeney, a postdoctoral research fellow at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's department of psychiatry. "For adults it would be uncommon to experience effects of caffeine intoxication at less than 250 milligrams of caffeine (or 2.5 cups of coffee)," she said. "...It would typically be more than 12 ounces, but much more common to have the negative effects with greater than 500 milligrams of caffeine."

Psychedelic drugs: The future of mental health - Reason
A recent study found that MDMA-assisted therapy could help veterans suffering from PTSD. Another paper from Johns Hopkins presented evidence that therapy in conjunction with psilocybin mushrooms can help ease the mental suffering of terminal cancer patients. These findings, among others, were presented at the 2017 Psychedelic Science Conference in Oakland, California.

How a man's near-death with cancer inspired him to fund LSD research - Inc.
[E]ntrepreneur Rodrigo Niño has launched Fundamental, a crowdfunding platform that allows people to fund psychedelic research in an effort to develop FDA-approved therapies.... The psychedelic renaissance was jumpstarted by Roland Griffiths, a professor of behavioral biology at Johns Hopkins, in 2006 when he published an influential paper about the meaningful spiritual experiences patients go through while on psilocybin.

Can psychedelic drugs treat mental illness? Scientists need your help to find out. - Huffington Post
This past December ... researchers at [New York University and] Johns Hopkins University published the results of two separate clinical trials on the effects of psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy on patients with cancer-related anxiety and depression. All told, between 60 and 80 percent of the subjects showed clinically significant reductions in both psychological disorders after treatment.

Researchers will soon evaluate risks, benefits of self-medicating with small doses of LSD - Mashable
Two concurrent studies at New York University and Johns Hopkins University found that psilocybin — a key compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms — can help ease existential depression in people with life-threatening cancer, specifically when taken in a controlled setting and combined with therapy.

Is a placebo better than nothing to treat insomnia? - Reuters
Beyond the small number of total participants, another limitation of the current study is that researchers didn’t have objective measurements of sleep quality or duration to compare placebos against no treatment, the authors note in Sleep Medicine. Still, the results make sense because insomnia is ultimately a disorder of perception, said Patrick Finan, a psychiatry and behavior researcher at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

A doorway to change - Psychology Today
At Johns Hopkins, psychiatrist Matthew Johnson led a 2014 pilot study of 15 longtime smokers treated with psilocybin and had found that 80 percent abstained from smoking six months after the trial — an especially compelling result as nicotine dependence is often thought to be primarily physiological....

One family's journey through a mental health crisis - Today
In a Q&A, Dr. Jennifer Payne, a noted researcher and clinician who directs the Women's Mood Disorder Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital, tells Today both medicine and society still have a ways to go in the treatment of mental illness.

Can psychedelic drugs treat anxiety and depression? - Men's Health
Psychedelics are again finding favor among scientists. NYU Langone isn't alone: Teams at institutions as varied as Imperial College London, the University of Alabama, and Johns Hopkins are currently studying them.

Know the warning signs of suicide - WBAL-TV
Following a segment on a new Netflix show that focuses on a teenage girl’s suicide, Dr. Holly Wilcox, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins, expresses concern that the show discusses suicide in an irresponsible and graphic way and suggest that if parents want to allow their children to watch it, they should watch it with them.

April

Psychedelic drugs might actually tap into a higher power (study) - Inverse
“It’s our thought that the foundational underpinnings of the world’s religions may stem from a common sense of unity and interconnectedness, and that perhaps there’s something very similar about them,” says Johns Hopkins psychologist Dr. Roland Griffiths, lead author of the study. 

‘Higher state of consciousness’ from psychedelics is not just a hippie idea — it’s biological - The Fix
As for psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, research from scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and Johns Hopkins University have found it to be an effective tool for treating depression and anxiety in terminally ill individuals.

What happens if you smoke marijuana every day? - USA Today and numerous subscribers
Dr. Ryan Vandrey, an associate professor at Johns Hopkins Medicine, says you can't generalize marijuana users. Other factors need to be considered, such as their dosage and the reason a person is using the drug. However, he said marijuana can have impact on how people perform at their job or at school. Withdrawal can occur after a period of long-term repeated use.

JCS Partners with Hopkins on Innovative Dementia Study – Baltimore Jewish Times
More than 10 years ago, the late philanthropist LeRoy E. Hoffberger sought to improve the lives of people living at home with dementia and the lives of their caregivers. Together, Hoffberger and Dr. Constantine Lyketsos, director of Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer’s Treatment Center, brainstormed on what became the MIND at Home: Memory Care Coordination studies. (MIND stands for Maximizing Independence)

Howard County's shortage of affordable housing for mentally ill undermines stability* - Baltimore Sun
Demand for Howard County General Hospital's inpatient psychiatric unit is increasing, according to a hospital spokesperson. A new psychiatric unit is part of the plans for a new two-story addition to the hospital, along with a larger expanded emergency unit and a new pediatric emergency unit.

The ayahuasca ceremony is going under the scientific-method microscope - Quartz
[R]ather than playing the sacred songs which are said to influence the effects of the ayahuasca, the researchers are considering using the same recorded music that is used in the psilocybin trials at Johns Hopkins and New York universities. 

Judge sees a boy, not a disorder - Baltimore Sun
One man sees a child suffering from a psychological disorder. The other sees a young civil rights leader. The sharply contrasting opinions of two prominent men from Baltimore – one a former chief psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the other a senior judge of the federal appeals court in Richmond — appear in the case of Gavin Grimm….

The Federal Government Makes It Ridiculously Hard to Study Gun Violence and Medical Marijuana - Scientific American
“It can't come off of Schedule I to a different schedule until the traditional drug development work has been done, and I don't think the traditional drug development work [large phase III trials] really can be done while it's Schedule I,” said Ryan Vandrey of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine on February 19 at the AAAS conference. “It's a catch-22.”

New research on treatment for pediatric bipolar disorder focus of UC Davis lecture - UC Davis Health
Robert Findling. Findling is the director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and vice chair in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins. He is also the vice president for Psychiatric Services and Research at the Kennedy Krieger Institute.

The Innovating, Creative Superpowers of ADHD - Yes Magazine
Dr. David Goodman, assistant professor of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, explained how a person can have an IQ of 140 or 80 and have ADHD.

5 ways to help a partner who's suffering from mild depression -  Prevention
Instead of reacting negatively to a thought or a feeling about your partner's depression (i.e. "why do you never want to go to the movies?") try asking a question that will make him or her feel like their feelings are valid, suggests Lauren Osborne, MD, assistant director of the Women's Mood Disorders Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Something like, "I notice you have been really irritable and down lately, do you want to talk?"

Hopkins to resume gender reassignment surgeries - Washington Blade
In a little-noticed development, Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore disclosed last July that it would open a new Center for Transgender Health and will resume performing gender reassignment surgeries after a 38-year hiatus.... “We will wait until we are fully staffed and officially open, probably this summer, before we plan any proactive outreach on the new Center for Transgender Health,” [a spokeswoman for] Johns Hopkins Medicine told the Washington Blade in an email.

Can trans people trust Johns Hopkins’s new clinic? - Daily Beast
[I]n a new statement to The Daily Beast ... a Johns Hopkins Medicine spokesperson stated: “Johns Hopkins Medicine has and is taking steps toward becoming an employer and provider of choice for all, including transgender individuals. And statements or actions to the contrary by current or former affiliates of Johns Hopkins do not reflect our institution’s current views. We are committed to being a caring, inclusive place for all patients, families and employees.”

The problem with America's marijuana DUI laws: Science - Reno Gazette Journal
While it would seem logical to model drugged driving laws after existing drunken driving laws, marijuana is a tricky substance. “Alcohol is the exception. Alcohol is the only drug that we can immediately determine whether someone is acutely impaired on the roadside,” said [Dr. Ryan Vandrey, associate professor of behavioral pharmacology research at Johns Hopkins University]. “There are lots of drugs that we don’t have reliable tests for – cannabis is the normative.”

March

I Saw The Light: Reducing anxiety, stress, depression, more with shrooms – City Paper
Nearly four decades after research into psychedelics was suppressed by the government, a new wave of scientists is restoring legitimacy to a misunderstood and promising area of research. Baltimore is home to arguably the most prestigious psychedelic research program in the world. The studies conducted by Roland Griffiths and his team at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine did not just commence this new era of legally sanctioned research; they are also the most rigorous scientific studies to date on psilocybin.

Hopkins was ready to test pot as a treatment for PTSD. Then it quit the study. - Washington Post and subscribers
Eighteen months after joining a study on using marijuana to treat post-traumatic stress disorder, Johns Hopkins University has pulled out without enrolling any veterans, the latest setback for the long-awaited research. A Johns Hopkins spokeswoman said the university’s goals were no longer aligned with those of the administrator of the study, the Santa Cruz-based Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). Also reported by: The Cannabist, Weed Weekly

Do You Zone Out? Procrastinate? Might Be Adult ADHD - NPR Shots

"It's very important to look at the questions in their totality, not each individual symptom," says Dr. David Goodman, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who was not involved in the study. "No single question stands out as indicating ADHD."

Social Media Is Causing Depression Among Teen Girls - MSN
A "steady stream of research" suggests that far more girls than boys are battling major depression in their almost-adult years — and the growing psychological dependence on Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram and other social media may be making young women more vulnerable to mental illness. Ramin Mojtabai’s research is mentioned.

Baltimore's spot in the history of psychotherapy* (audio) WYPR-FM
As the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work gathered [in Baltimore] this past weekend, [WYPR talked]  to two therapists [including Daniel Buccino, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a clinical supervisor in the community psychiatry program at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center] about Baltimore’s special spot in the development of psychoanalysis, the challenges for therapists and residents in a city suffused with trauma….

The sublime psychology of Baltimore - Baltimore Sun
This opinion piece that looks at Baltimore’s "tender and tough, wounded and surviving, swaggering and fearful, Northern and Southern, black and white" psychology was co-written by Daniel Buccino, clinical director of the Mood Disorders Clinic at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

Why some women may be more biologically susceptible to postpartum depression - Shape
Researchers estimate that only 15 percent of women who are affected [by postpartum depression] get treatment. That's why we're stoked to see the latest research coming from Johns Hopkins University. It shows that having high levels of an anti-anxiety hormone throughout pregnancy — especially the second trimester — may protect soon-to-be-moms against PPD.

How tripping kills your fear of dying, and why that could change your life - The Rooster
Matthew W. Johnson is a researcher at Johns Hopkins who has the interesting job of giving magic mushrooms to dying people. In one recent study, with FDA approval and university funding, Johnson got 51 cancer patients [high] on mushrooms, and 80 percent of them said it helped them feel more optimistic and less scared of death.

Why the clinical use of psychedelics may heal sexual trauma - Psychology Today
Research on such chemicals as psilocybin (the psychoactive ingredient in "magic mushrooms") and MDMA ("ecstasy") are now in Phase 3 FDA-approved trials, with significant preliminary results. Psilocybin research at Johns Hopkins University and NYU, for example, have found that patients with terminal cancer experienced a reduction in mortality related depression and anxiety and heightened levels of well-being.

Forgiveness … the ultimate freedom - W4CY radio (West Palm Beach, Fla.)
More and more though it is being found that ... feelings [of hurt, anger and resentfulness] negatively impact our health: “There is an enormous physical burden to being hurt and disappointed,” says Karen Swartz, M.D., director of the Mood Disorders Adult Consultation Clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Forgiveness, however, calms stress levels, leading to improved health.”

The psychedelic miracle - Rolling Stone
Currently – legally – we're in the midst of a psychedelic renaissance. New York University, the University of New Mexico, the University of Zurich, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Alabama and the University of California-Los Angeles have all partnered with the psilocybin-focused Heffter Research Institute, studying the compound for smoking cessation, alcoholism, terminal-cancer anxiety and cocaine dependence....

February

Hope you’re ready for the next episode - Boulder Weekly (Colorado)
[P] is getting attention for proving very (very) effective in treating notoriously difficult to treat conditions like end-of-life anxiety, chronic depression and addiction. As just one example, in a 2016 study performed by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine ... it was reported that 80 percent of patients showed “large decreases in clinician and self-rated measures of depressed mood and anxiety, along with increases in quality of life, life meaning, and optimism, and decreases in death anxiety.” Six months later the results were sustained without further treatment.  

Could a club drug be the secret to curing PTSD? - Elle
Other psychedelics [besides MDMA] are also yielding promising lab results, including psilocybin (the active ingredient in so-called magic mushrooms), which teams of researchers from Johns Hopkins and New York University found can reduce anxiety and depression in cancer patients.

'River on Fire' explores genius, madness and the poetry of Robert Lowell - NPR and numerous affiliates
Kay Redfield Jamison's new book describes how Lowell's manic-depressive illness influenced his life and work. "His manias tended to lead him into writing a fresh kind of poetry," she says.... She's a professor in mood disorders and psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Senior Nation: The Science of Forgetfulness with Dr. Constantine Lyketsos (video)
Chestertown Spy (Eastern Shore)
On March 8, the Talbot Hospice will be sponsoring a lecture by one of the leading experts in dementia and Alzheimer’s disease at Easton High School. Dr. Lyketsos, from the [Johns] Hopkins department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, will address these issues and the devastating effects of the illness, but also promising new treatments. The Spy traveled to Baltimore to sit down with Lyketsos before the event for a primer on dementia and memory loss.

Why having sex on cocaine can be dangerous - Esquire
Cocaine makes people do risky [stuff], and science has long tracked the increased risk of cocaine users contracting STIs. But the reason was never scientifically clear. A new, government-funded (!) study from Johns Hopkins, however, found that cocaine use not only increases sexual desire, but it makes that sex more dangerous. 

Can all suicides be prevented in an inpatient facility like St. Joe's?CBC (Canada)
Dr. Geetha Jayaram is quoted.

Kay Redfield Jamison puts Robert Lowell on the couch in a fascinating biography - Washington Post
Jamison contends that “instability and the relentless recurrence of [Lowell's] illness hardened his discipline while mania impelled and stamped his work.” To establish her diagnosis, this distinguished professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and author of the best-selling memoir “An Unquiet Mind” brings to bear everything she can think of.

The Rise of Mood Tracking: How Big Data Can Transform Psychiatry – Reach MD
Dr. Adam Kaplin, founder and inventor of Mood 24/7, discusses the emergence of mood tracking portals and how they can transform mental health care.

Worrying about your grown kids really can keep you up at night - Reuters
[S]ome parents who worry excessively about their adult children might benefit from therapy to improve coping skills or minimize stress, said Dr. Patrick Finan, a researcher in psychiatry and behavioral health at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore who wasn't involved in the study.

Marijuana as medicine? Weed study exploring clinical trials on military veterans with post traumatic stress disorder - International Business Times
Participants will finish 17 outpatient visits to one of the two study location clinics — one in Phoenix, led by Dr. Sue Sisley, and another at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, led by Ryan Vandrey. The team will be tracking measurements of PTSD, PTSD symptoms and safety data to dig for “vital information on marijuana dosing, composition, side effects, and areas of benefit to clinicians and legislators considering marijuana as a potential treatment for PTSD. ”

Cocaine users are more likely to have sexually transmitted diseases – for this reason
The Telegraph (U.K.)
People who regularly use cocaine are more likely to have sexually transmitted diseases than non-users. According to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, this may in part be due to a "sexual-impatience" brought on by the drug which increases the likelihood that users will not bother to use condoms. Also reported by: Inverse, Med India

Can LSD treat depression? Microdosing in the mainstream - WTOP-AM
When routine therapies and medications failed to help Ayelet Waldman overcome intense mood swings and a deep depression, she turned to something that is generally associated with harm, not health: LSD. Waldman heard about microdosing, or taking tiny doses of drugs, thanks to its growing presence in the media. Researchers at Johns Hopkins and New York universities have studied the impact of psychedelic drugs on cancer patients for anxiety.

Marijuana anxiety? Here's what to do if you have a panic attack while high - Mic
Can weed cause panic attacks? "It can," said Ryan Vandrey, who studies the behavioral pharmacology of cannabis use at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in a phone interview. "It happens from direct effects of the drug in the brain and/or direct effects of the drug on body."

January

The potentially dangerous effect cocaine can have on your sex life
Cosmopolitan
A study by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, United States has discovered a correlation between people who use cocaine and the increased risk of catching and spreading STIs.

Is the Mediterranean diet good for kids, too?
CNN
For parents who would like to introduce a Mediterranean diet into their children's daily eating routine, Dr. Carolina Vidal, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins Medicine, offered a few tips. "Slowly introduce fruits and vegetables, and present them consistently with the other foods they eat.

(Yes, it’s possible to have too much caffeine (and these are the caffeine overdose symptoms to look for)
Health
Life-threatening incidents of caffeine overdose are fortunately extremely rare, says Maggie Sweeney, PhD, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who studies caffeine. "It would be very difficult to get to a lethal dose of caffeine through consuming coffee," she explains. "[Coffee] sort of has preventive measures because it is difficult to consume that volume of liquid."

Treatment can help turn around opioid abuse (video)
WBAL-TV
"I used Percocet for four or five years. When that became too expensive, I switched to heroin," [Ashley] Stuart said. "I lost my storage, my car, my house and my job." With that loss, Stuart sought help at the Johns Hopkins Broadway Center for Addiction, where she goes for buprenorphine treatments and gets extensive counseling. The center's director, Dr. Kenneth Stoller, said treatment is what this opioid epidemic needs.

FDA clears Lurasidone (Latuda) for schizophrenia in adolescents* (study)
Medscape
"The impact on development and poor prognosis frequently associated with schizophrenia that begins in adolescence underscores the need for treatment that is both well-tolerated and effective," Robert Findling, MD, vice president, psychiatric services and research, Kennedy Krieger Institute, and director of child and adolescent psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, and a study investigator, said in the release. "The availability of Latuda provides healthcare providers with an important new option for helping adolescents with this illness…." added Dr Findling.

Hit the hay: Three reasons why good sleep is crucial for mental health
Psych Central
One in three American adults don’t get enough sleep. Though Johns Hopkins Medicine reports that as many as ninety percent of North Americans respond to this chronic lack of sleep with a regular dose of caffeine, that little pick-me-up doesn’t cut it.

Magic mushrooms as mental health treatment
U.S. News & World Report
[Sherry] Marcy learned about an ongoing study at Johns Hopkins University using psilocybin for cancer patients with persistent, treatment-resistant depression. Marcy, who had never tried psychedelic drugs recreationally – she didn't disapprove; it just wasn't her thing – experienced her first drug trip as a study volunteer.

Hallucinogens: Future of mental health treatment?
WebMD
Matthew Johnson, PhD, a research psychologist at Johns Hopkins University, says he’d be surprised if hallucinogenic drugs didn’t have a proper medical use “under some constrained, limited circumstances.” “Most powerful substances that we know of, that have powerful effects on the central nervous system, are like any powerful tool,” says Johnson, who has studied how psilocybin affects depression. “They can have dangerous effects, or beneficial effects...."

I didn’t believe I had an eating disorder. But the threat of forced feeding saved my life
Stat
“Those of us who have treated 1,000 plus patients know that we are bad at predicting who will recover and have seen recovery in some of the most severely ill and chronic cases, even in cases who failed multiple treatments,” [Angela Guarda, director of the eating disorders program at Johns Hopkins University] said in an email. “There is much danger in viewing anorexia as a terminal illness. Instilling hope and helping patients find a path to recovery should always be our goal.”

Why psychedelics like magic mushrooms kill the ego and fundamentally transform the brain
Business Insider
On a chilly December morning, [Clark] Martin walked into the facility at Johns Hopkins, where he was greeted by two researchers, including Bill Richards, a psychologist. The three of them [went] over the details of [a] study and what might happen. Martin received a pill and swallowed it with a glass of water. For study purposes, he couldn't know whether it was a placebo or psilocybin, the drug the researchers aimed to study.

How LSD saved one woman’s marriage
New York Times
Researchers at institutions like New York University and Johns Hopkins have yielded promising results administering psilocybin to cancer patients to relieve anxiety, combat obsessive-compulsive disorder and even treat addiction to other drugs.

Researchers are giving religious leaders hallucinogenic drugs to understand mystical experiences
Business Insider
In recent weeks we've heard more and more about the resurgence in psychedelic research, with scientists from Johns Hopkins and New York University talking about how hallucinogenic psilocybin could work "like a surgical intervention for mental illness."

Religious leaders are experimenting with psychedelics for scientific purposes
Esquire
The indescribable high, intense emotions, and intimate sense of self experienced under the influence of magic mushrooms are similar to another kind of trip: a religiously mystical experience. So, as science naturally muses, let's give shrooms to deeply religious people and see what happens. That's how [13 religious leaders] started taking psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, at Johns Hopkins University and New York University.

LSD, yoga, and the therapeutic process of ‘ego dissolution’
New York magazine
A Johns Hopkins study last year found that psilocybin helped people who had been smoking a pack a day for decades quit at double the success rate of the best pharmaceutical treatments. “Our data does indicate that stronger mystical experiences are associated with success,” lead author Matthew Johnson told Science of Us.

Researchers are feeding priests psychedelic drugs in the interest of science
Quartz
[R]esearchers have found consistent overlap between mystical experiences that occur naturally and those that are caused by psilocybin. “All we’re doing is finding conditions that increase the likelihood of these mystical experiences, and we still don’t know their ultimate cause,” says Roland Griffiths, a principal investigator across multiple Johns Hopkins psilocybin trials.

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