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Independent Residency Program

The independent residency program, which is accredited by ACGME, is open to residents who have already completed a surgery residency (see Prerequisites below). This 3-year residency provides a concentrated program in plastic surgery.
It is available for residents who have satisfactorily completed a formal training program (and are board admissible or certified) in general surgery, otolaryngology, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, urology or oral and maxillofacial surgery (the latter requiring two years of general surgery training in addition to an M.D./DDS). Successful completion of these ACGME or ADA accredited programs fulfills the prerequisite training requirement.

Residents can officially begin a plastic surgery training program (requisite training) after completion of any of these prerequisite options, which all require confirmation by the ABPS (Evaluation of Training Form with confirmation letter regarding the acceptability of the prerequisite training for the ABPS certification process).

The program accepts one resident per year. Typically, 75 people apply.
Learn more about the curriculum, program prerequisiteshow to apply to the program and who to contact for more information.

Program Goals

The goal of the independent residency program is to provide residents with a dynamic and innovative education curriculum to mentor and train residents to become leaders in the field of plastic surgery

Rotation Schedule

independent residency block schedule. Click to expand Click to expand the rotation block schedule.
 

Core Locations

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
The plastic surgery rotation at Johns Hopkins Bayview has a heavy emphasis on hand and wrist surgery. The plastic surgery service covers hand surgery consults and emergencies 24/7 at the medical center.

Johns Hopkins Burn Unit
Residents will spend time in the burn unit learning about intensive care for critically injured patients. The operative experience is focused on management of acute burn injuries and treatment of secondary deformities related to burns.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital: Edgerton Service
The Edgerton Service is one of two primary plastic surgery services at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The clinical focus is adult and pediatric craniofacial surgery, including cleft lip/palate, cranial vault procedures, orthognathic surgery, facial reanimation and traumatic injuries. In addition, there is broad exposure to pediatric plastic surgery, including burn reconstruction, pediatric hand surgery and urogenital reconstruction.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital: Hoopes Service
Clinical care on the Hoopes Service is focused on breast reconstruction, microsurgery and adult hand surgery. On this service, residents learn and master microsurgical skill, performing a wide array of microsurgical procedures, such as breast reconstruction, lymphedema surgery and lower extremity salvage procedures. You will work closely with other surgical specialties to learn how to manage complex reconstructive patients and choose and execute the most appropriate procedure on the reconstructive ladder.

University of Maryland/Shock Trauma/Baltimore VA Rotation
This rotation focuses on head-to-toe reconstruction and craniomaxillofacial trauma. The University of Maryland experience is clinically heavy in breast and abdominal wall reconstruction. The Shock Trauma experience is focused on repair of acute and secondary traumatic deformities, with a heavy emphasis on craniofacial and lower extremity reconstruction. The VA rotation has a large volume of soft tissue reconstruction following skin cancer resection, as well as general reconstruction.

Additional Locations

Chief Resident Aesthetic Rotation
Chief residents on this rotation will have their own cosmetic clinic, where they will provide aesthetic procedures. The experience is supplemented by elective time with community surgeons based on resident interests, e.g., facial plastic surgery, body contouring, etc.

Chief Resident Regional Elective Rotation
This structured, elective rotation allows chief residents to spend two months focused on one of four core areas of plastic surgery: general reconstruction, aesthetic surgery, craniomaxillofacial surgery, or hand and lower extremity surgery. Residents will spend two months with an intense operative experience in an area of their choice.

Oculoplastic Surgery
During this rotation, residents will spend two months with Michael Grant, who is board certified in plastic surgery and ophthalmology. This rotation will emphasize reconstructive and cosmetic surgery of the periorbital region, including primary and secondary orbital reconstruction, eyelid reconstruction, and facial cosmetic surgery.

National Capital Consortium 
Senior residents on the National Capital Consortium will split their time between community surgical practices and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The community component heavily emphasizes aesthetic surgery. The Walter Reed component involves head-to-toe reconstruction of secondary defects from battlefield injuries and reconstruction of post-ablative defects.

Peripheral Nerve
This one-month rotation is focused on teaching the diagnostic and surgical principles related to management of patients with peripheral nerve injuries. The resident will spend time with A. Lee Dellon and learn about surgical interventions for neuropathy, from head to toe.

Senior Resident Elective Rotation
PGY-5 residents are given one month of elective time to refine their interests in a particular area in anticipation of postresidency career planning (fellowships, etc.). Elective rotations may be domestic or overseas and can focus on any area of plastic surgery.

St. Agnes Hospital
Clinical care during this rotation is focused on primary reconstruction of post-traumatic and post-ablative deformities, as well as aesthetic surgery of the face and body. 

Union Memorial Hospital/Curtis National Hand Center
During this rotation block, residents focus solely on hand and upper extremity reconstruction and free tissue transfer. The Curtis National Hand Center is a specialty center for management of congenital and acquired diseases of the hand and upper extremity.

Prerequisites

Residents who have satisfactorily completed a formal training program (and are board admissible or certified) in general surgery, otolaryngology, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, urology or maxillofacial surgery (the latter requiring two years of general surgery training in addition to an M.D./DDS) can begin a plastic surgery training program. Successful completion of these ACGME or ADA accredited programs fulfills the prerequisite training requirement. Confirmation by the ABPS (Evaluation of Training Form) with confirmation letter regarding the acceptability of the prerequisite training for the ABPS certification process.

How to apply

Applicants to the independent program must apply through the San Francisco matching program. The faculty conducts interviews of applicants in March.

Contact information

Program coordinator: Kristin Hook
Phone number: 410-502-7381
Program director: Scott D. Lifchez, M.D.
Phone number: 410-550-0407