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Conditions We Treat: Brachial Nerve Injury

Brachial plexus injury (BPI) is an umbrella term for a variety of conditions affecting the nerve network that originates in the neck and provides movement and sensation in the arms and hands.  Most brachial plexus injuries are caused by trauma such as motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries or falls, but they can also result from cancer and radiation therapy. Brachial plexus injury can also occur during birth.

Brachial Plexus Injury: Why Choose Johns Hopkins

brachial plexus drawing
  • The experts at Johns Hopkins are renowned for surgical treatment for brachial plexus injuries, treating a large number of patients with this disorder. 

  • The team is especially skilled in assessing each individual patient and determining if and when surgical intervention is appropriate.

  • You will benefit from our multidisciplinary approach, with insights from neurology, neurosurgery and orthopaedics.

  • Our holistic approach addresses the total well-being of the patient. You can rely on our experience, successful surgical outcome record and access to quality hospital care. 

Treatment for Brachial Plexus Injury

  • Babies with brachial plexus birth injury may be able to recover with no treatment, but it may take several months, and regular check-ups are often recommended.
  • Your doctor may recommend physical therapy to help restore function in your arms and hands and improve your flexibility.
  • Severe brachial plexus injuries may require surgery.

Your Peripheral Nerve Surgery Team

Surgeons

Advanced Practitioners

  • Bronwyn Slobogan, P.A.

Patient Resources

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