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Residency Curriculum and Rotations

A didactic curriculum for basic and clinical sciences is taught by the faculty with an emphasis on resident participation. Information is kept on a resident education website. To supplement these sessions, grand rounds are conducted each week. Several additional courses in each subspecialty, as well as in pathology, anatomy and basic science are given throughout the year.

Each resident is given sufficient graded responsibility and opportunity to make important clinical decisions and perform a variety of major and minor orthopaedic procedures. Responsibility progresses with increasing knowledge and skill level in the setting of a supportive faculty and the protective environment of a hospital with experienced and academically involved attending staff.

Each participating hospital also has its own series of subspecialty teaching conferences. Residents attend the conferences appropriate to each rotation.

In addition, two three-hour teaching sessions per month are held in the International Center for Orthopaedic Advancement, which combines a surgical dissection suite with an instrument development lab. Here residents become familiar with implants, devices and instruments for orthopaedic surgery and receive hands-on experience with sawbones and cadavers.

PGY-5 residents (chiefs) manage the The Johns Hopkins Hospital trauma, pediatric orthopaedics and orthopaedic oncology.

Program Year One (PGY-1) Rotations

  • Four months of general surgery
    • One month of trauma surgery
    • One month of vascular surgery
    • One month of plastic surgery
    • One month of intensive care
  • One month of motor skills
  • Seven months of orthopaedics​
    • Six months of adult orthopaedic trauma/oncology
    • One month of orthopaedic pathology/radiology
    • Two weeks of vacation during orthopaedic trauma/oncology

Program Year Two (PGY-2) Rotations

Six 8-week blocks:

  • Spine at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Pediatrics at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Sports at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Hand at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Trauma at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Joints and trauma at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
  • Four weeks of vacation

Program Year Three (PGY-3) Rotations

Six 8-week blocks:

  • Pediatrics at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Joints and trauma at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
  • Shoulder at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Hand at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Foot/ankle at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Bayview
  • Research
  • Four weeks of vacation

Program Year Four (PGY-4) Rotations

Six 8-week blocks:

  • Hand at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Trauma at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
  • Joints at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
  • Joints and spine at Suburban Hospital
  • Shoulder and community trauma at Howard County
  • Research
  • Four weeks of vacation

Program Year Five (PGY-5) Rotations

Six 8-week blocks:

  • Adult trauma at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Pediatrics at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Orthopaedic oncology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Outreach/spine at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Sports at The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Joints, spine and sports at National Capitol Region
  • Four weeks of vacation

Outreach and Volunteer Opportunities

Many of our faculty volunteer their surgical skills to underserved populations, both in the United States and abroad. Residents have time and financial support and are strongly encouraged to participate in an outreach trip during their fourth-year.

Operation Walk Maryland is a private, not-for-profit volunteer medical organization that provides comprehensive, state-of-the-art free hip and knee replacements for impoverished patients throughout the world. This is done while educating local health care professionals on the most advanced treatments for debilitating joint disease. It is headed by Harpal (Paul) Khanuja, M.D..