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Johns Hopkins Children’s Center

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General Pediatrics

General Pediatrics patient check-upFollowing its medical home model, the Harriet Lane Clinic brings a range of health-related services to patients and their families.

The Johns Hopkins Children's Center is not only one of the premier children’s hospitals in the country, but a neighborhood hospital whose mission is to treat all children regardless of their financial capabilities. Johns Hopkins Children’s Center has provided primary health care services to the underserved community since 1912 through the Harriet Lane Clinic.

The Harriet Lane Clinic serves as a medical home to approximately 8,500 infants, children and adolescents with about 16,000 visits per year. Most of our families live in the East Baltimore Community, and about 90 percent of patients are insured through the Medicaid program and the Maryland Children's Health Program. The clinic has a variety of on-site health-related services for patients and their caregivers. The Children's Medical Practice at Bayview is home to about 3,000 infants and children with approximately 11,000 visits per year. These outpatient clinics serve as training sites for medical students, pediatric residents and fellows, as well as other health professional trainees. Our mission is to improve the health of children and adolescents within the context of their family and community and to educate trainees in this model of care. 

Do your patients have a medical home?

Imagine you’re a primary care pediatrician meeting a new family who recently moved to your city or town. The family has two children: Dion, a six-month-old who was born 28 weeks prematurely with feeding difficulties, chronic lung disease and developmental delays, and Shawna, a 12-year-old with moderate persistent asthma, anxiety and depression. The mother, a 32-year-old with a history of depression, is unemployed and lives with friends. Learn more.

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