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A B C D E F G H I J K LM N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0-9
(A-Z listing includes diseases, conditions, tests and procedures)
 

Abdominal Pain

What is abdominal pain?

Abdominal pain is any pain felt between your chest and groin. This is often referred to as the stomach region or belly. Pain can originate from any of the many organs within the abdomen, including:

  • Digestive organs (the end of the esophagus, the stomach, the small and large intestines, the liver, the gallbladder and the pancreas)

  • The aorta

  • The appendix

  • The kidneys

  • The spleen

However, the pain may start from somewhere else, like your chest or pelvic area. You may also have a generalized infection, such as the flu or strep throat, that affects many parts of your body.

Symptoms

Pain in the abdominal area.

Diagnosis

Many different conditions can cause abdominal pain. The key is to know when to seek medical care. Any of the following may cause abdominal pain:

Diagnostic tests may include:

In infants, prolonged unexplained crying (often called colic) may be caused by abdominal pain that may end with the passage of gas or stool. Colic is often worse in the evening. Cuddling and rocking the child may bring some relief.

Treatment

Seek immediate medical help if your child:

  • Is unable to pass stool, especially with vomiting

  • Is vomiting blood or has blood in his or her stool (especially if maroon or dark, tarry black)

  • Has chest, neck or shoulder pain

  • Has sudden, sharp abdominal pain

  • Has pain in his or her shoulder blades with nausea

  • Belly is rigid, hard and tender to touch

Call the doctor if your child has:

  • Abdominal discomfort that lasts one week or longer

  • Bloating that persists for more than two days

  • Burning sensation when you urinate or frequent urination

  • Diarrhea for more than five days, or if your infant or child has diarrhea for more than two days or vomiting for more than 12 hours (Call right away if a baby younger than three months has diarrhea or vomiting.)

  • Fever over 100.4 degrees Farhenheit with pain

  • Prolonged poor appetite

  • Unexplained weight loss 

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