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Celebrate Match Day 2022

Students smile and share their matches for Match Day.

Match Day is the rite of passage in the lives of graduating medical students, who will advance to a three- to seven-year residency program, getting hands-on experience in a specific discipline.

It was incredible to celebrate Match Day in-person with the Class of 2022 and their loved ones for an afternoon full of excitement and emotion. 126 students matched in 26 states and the District of Columbia.

Thank you to the Class of 2022 for letting us share in this important moment of your lives. We look forward to keeping in touch and hearing about your journeys. Congratulations!

Link to YouTube recording  Link to Photobooth Photos

Students celebrating their matches.
Students celebrating their matches.
Class representative, Andrew Lea, gives a speech.
Class representative, Andrew Lea, gives a speech.
Students sharing in the excitement of Match Day.
Students sharing in the excitement of Match Day.
Student celebrates getting their match.
Student celebrates getting their match.
Student celebrates their match with loved ones.
Student celebrates their match with loved ones.
Johns Hopkins members celebrating Match Day.
Johns Hopkins members celebrating Match Day.
A congratulatory hug is shared.
A congratulatory hug is shared.
Students proudly share their matches.
Students proudly share their matches.
A student proudly displays their match.
A student proudly displays their match.
A congratulatory hug is shared as celebrations continue.
A congratulatory hug is shared as celebrations continue.
Students celebrating their matches.
Students celebrating their matches.
Class representative, Andrew Lea, gives a speech.
Class representative, Andrew Lea, gives a speech.
Students sharing in the excitement of Match Day.
Students sharing in the excitement of Match Day.
Student celebrates getting their match.
Student celebrates getting their match.
Student celebrates their match with loved ones.
Student celebrates their match with loved ones.
Johns Hopkins members celebrating Match Day.
Johns Hopkins members celebrating Match Day.
A congratulatory hug is shared.
A congratulatory hug is shared.
Students proudly share their matches.
Students proudly share their matches.
A student proudly displays their match.
A student proudly displays their match.
A congratulatory hug is shared as celebrations continue.
A congratulatory hug is shared as celebrations continue.

Match Day 2022 Program:
Friday, March 18, 2022

11:25 a.m. – Opening Remarks

  • Dr. Sarah L. Clever, Assistant Dean for Medical Student Affairs
  • Dr. Shari M. Lawson, Assistant Dean for Medical Student Affairs and Director of Medical Student Diversity
  • Dr. Mitchell Goldstein, Director of the Colleges Advisory Program

11:30 a.m. Class of 2022 Video

11:35 a.m. Guest Speakers

  • Dr. Paul B. Rothman, Dean of the Medical Faculty, Chief Executive Officer, Johns Hopkins Medicine (2012-2022)Watch now
  • Dr. Roy C. Ziegelstein, Vice Dean for Education
  • Mr. Andrew Lea, Representative for the Class of 2022
  • Dr. Katherine C. Chretien, Associate Dean for Medical Student Affairs 

11:50 a.m. Envelope Distribution

11:55 a.m. Countdown

  • Dr. Katherine C. Chretien, Associate Dean for Medical Student Affairs

Meet Our Students

Meet some of our outstanding medical students as they eagerly await news of where they will match:

 

Jonlin Chen

Jonlin Chen.

Where is your hometown?

I grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and moved to Ithaca, New York, in high school.

What made you want to enter the medical field?

Growing up in a family of engineers, I was fortunate to be surrounded by caring, creative parents and sisters who taught me how to be resourceful through building Lego robots and fixing printers together. I pursued bioengineering in college and learned about the intersection of engineering and medicine. Junior year, through an internship building minimally invasive surgical tools for patients with colorectal cancer, I got the opportunity to shadow various general surgeons. Watching how they patiently listened to each patient’s concerns and carefully explained long-term care plans to help reassure their loved ones inspired me to do the same one day. Since then, I have strived to find a career where I can combine innovation and medicine to best serve others.

Why did you choose the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine?

Second Look Weekend 100% sealed the deal for me! As admitted students, we got the opportunity to visit Hopkins and Baltimore for a weekend. I vividly remember the “family” feel I sensed that weekend. In speaking with older students, I learned about the various passions they had in medicine (from public health to music in medicine) and how Hopkins helped support their journeys. I left Baltimore inspired by the warmth of both older students and incoming students, and knew this was the place I wanted to be for medical school.

What is your focus area of study?

I am currently applying into plastic and reconstructive surgery.

What has been your best/most memorable experience while at Johns Hopkins?

So many great memories — where do I begin? Helping take care of a patient who was also a leader in the Baltimore community for promoting racial equity and learning the true meaning of selflessness. Meeting a family in the emergency room to let them know grandpa would be OK. Working with a resident patient enough to guide me through how to suture in the operating room for the first time. Practicing interviewing patients with classmates and learning together how to be vulnerable. Meeting and sitting next to my life partner in lectures first-year not knowing we would be couples matching five years later. Working together with Thomas College members to build a hanging art piece and winning first place in the College Olympics Art Battle. Finding ways to virtually build a sense of community through Zoom lab meetings and workouts with classmates when the pandemic began. Serving as co-presidents of Thomas College with close friends in my molecule and improving our leadership skills together. I am forever grateful for these moments of personal growth Hopkins has provided me.

What would you most like to be remembered for? 

I hope to ultimately be remembered as a provider who takes time to listen to and care for each patient, treating others with kindness regardless of how busy things become. I also hope to be remembered as one who balances both professional and personal duties. As the first person in my family to pursue medicine, I would not be where I am today without the support of my mentors, friends and family. I hope to always show them my deepest appreciation throughout this journey.

What are your plans for the future?

I plan to work hard as a resident and potentially pursue fellowship afterward. I feel grateful for the strong mentorship and teaching I have received from patients, students, residents and attendings in all fields at Hopkins. I want to pay that forward by helping train the next generation of physicians in the future.

Tell me something interesting about yourself that makes you unique. For example: Do you have any special hobbies, interests or life experiences?

I am a ballerina turned medical student and trained with the Pittsburgh Ballet and Ithaca Ballet from elementary school to college. In my free time, I love exploring all things food-related, including writing Yelp reviews for local Baltimore restaurants and cooking up delicious meals.

Jonlin matched to Johns Hopkins Hospital for Plastic Surgery.


Andy Ding 

Andy Ding.

Where is your hometown?

I was born in Los Angeles, but I grew up in Salt Lake City.

What made you want to enter the medical field?

I initially wanted to go into tech, but as I studied computer science in undergrad, I felt drawn toward applications of technology in health care and how computational models can solve complex clinical problems. From predicting the spread of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease with graph theory to decluttering patient monitors with machine learning algorithms, I was engrossed by the breadth of technological innovation within medicine. I ultimately felt that a career in medicine would be the most meaningful way for me to forge deep connections with my surrounding community while still maintaining an avenue to channel my interest in technology and engineering.

Why did you choose the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine?

My decision to matriculate at Johns Hopkins largely stemmed from my interactions with students and faculty during my interview day. At no other institution did I feel a sense of camaraderie and wonder to the extent I did at Hopkins. Looking back, I’m happy that I took a leap of faith and traveled across the country for my medical training. I met my closest friends, my most supportive mentors and my life partner here!

What is your focus area of study?

I am applying into otolaryngology–head and neck surgery, with plans to pursue a fellowship in neurotology.

What has been your best/most memorable experience while at Johns Hopkins?

One of my most memorable experiences has been working with the MERIT Health Leadership Academy to teach math to middle school students in Baltimore. I was amazed by the determination and ambition of these students, and felt inspired in helping them achieve their goals. Being able to connect with these driven and brilliant scholars early in their academic journey was truly an honor.

What would you most like to be remembered for?

I hope to be remembered as someone who strives emphatically in the clinic to partner with my patients; in the lab to push the envelope of academic otolaryngology; and in the operating room to uphold a collaborative learning environment for others.

My father was the first member of my family to pursue a medical career in the United States, while my mother was the backbone who kept us afloat. Through the difficulties of living in a new country, speaking a new language and learning a new culture, my parents to me are resilience personified. While my parents have blazed the trail to medicine in our family, I am the first in my family to carry on the torch of wisdom and service that they have borne for decades. Feeling their support along the way has been my main source of motivation in medical school.

What are your plans for the future?

I intend to become a surgeon-scientist investigating innovative machine learning systems to augment our armamentarium of tools for treating otolaryngologic diseases. As artificial intelligence becomes increasingly complex and sophisticated, I hope to be a part of the medical community that is actively adapting this evolving technology into clinical and surgical workspaces.

Tell me something interesting about yourself that makes you unique. 

I practiced Shaolin martial arts for almost 10 years, and trained with the Shaolin monks to obtain my black belt. During that black belt test, I was involved in an exhibition match with one of the Shaolin monks, who swiftly and decisively kicked my butt!

Andy matched to Johns Hopkins Hospital for Otolaryngology.


Catalina Garzon

Catalina Garzon

Where is your hometown?

Bogota, Colombia

What made you want to enter the medical field?

My parents’ example of dedication and compassion motivated me to pursue a career in medicine. For me, medicine is the unique opportunity to be present and support patients in the most vulnerable moments of their lives, such as an illness, and at the same time integrate knowledge, critical thinking, technology and manual dexterity to alleviate or cure the burden of their disease.

Why did you choose the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine?

It is the epicenter of world-class leaders, committed teachers, brilliant innovators and compassionate mentors who are not only interested in your professional development but also in your personal growth.

What is your focus area of study?

Ophthalmology.

What has been your best/most memorable experience while at Johns Hopkins?

There are many amazing memories, such as holding the heart during a transplant surgery or doing research in India, but undoubtedly, I will always remember with the biggest smile those conversations that I had with my patients in Spanish. They were filled with a sense of warmth, familiarity and vulnerability, reminding me of the privilege we have to learn about a patient’s life story.

What would you most like to be remembered for?

First in my family to go to medical school in the United States.

What are your plans for the future?

I will be starting ophthalmology residency at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai during the summer.

Tell me something interesting about yourself that makes you unique.

I love God, family and any type of adventure (e.g., rollercoasters, skydiving, shark swimming and all of that!).

Catalina matched to ISMMS Mount Sinai Beth Israel New York Eye and Ear Infirmary for Ophthalmology.


Andrew Lea & Andrew Supron

Andrew Lea and Andrew Supron

Where is your hometown?

AL: Richland, Washington

AS: Morristown, New Jersey

What made you want to enter the medical field?

AL: My path to medical school was more circuitous than most. I actually came to medicine by way of history: I was a history major in college, and after graduating, I went on to earn a doctorate in the history of medicine. I entered the medical field because it was a place where I could continue to engage with the questions that fascinated me as a historian, but do so in a way that could have a direct impact on people’s lives.

AS: What fascinated me most about medicine was, and still is, its numerous dimensions. The scientific foundations and the humanistic applications. The ability to conduct cutting-edge research, and the chance to teach students just starting their medical careers. And of course, the privilege of being able to combine these elements in the care of another human being.

Why did you choose the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine?

AL: My decision to come to Hopkins ultimately came down to two factors. Factor #1: the people. When I met with Hopkins medical students during my interview day, I was immediately struck by how warm, friendly and down to earth everyone was. Factor #2: the mentorship. Between the formal support through the Colleges Advisory Program and informal meetings with research mentors, I saw that Hopkins was a place that takes mentorship seriously and is invested in the success and well-being of its trainees. Four years later, I couldn’t be happier with my decision!

AS: I chose Hopkins because of its strength in every medical specialty, as well as for the passion that the faculty and house staff here have for sharing their fields of interest. Every day, I’m amazed by the quality of care that Hopkins physicians provide to their patients, integrating the latest research and technology with patient-centered approaches. At the same time, they bring to the table so much energy and teach so fervidly that their excitement becomes contagious. 

What is your focus area of study?

AL: I am applying into internal medicine, couples matching with my partner (also named Andrew!). Within internal medicine, I am still undecided, but I’m currently most interested in infectious diseases and general internal medicine.

AS: Like my partner, I am applying into internal medicine! I’m not exactly sure what subspecialty of IM intrigues me the most, but I can’t wait to continue exploring throughout residency!

What has been your best/most memorable experience while at Johns Hopkins?

AL: There have been so many highlights, but I would get myself in trouble if I didn’t say that meeting my partner, Andrew Supron, was the best experience.

AS: Meeting Andrew was the greatest highlight of my time at Hopkins!

What would you most like to be remembered for?

AL: I hope to be remembered as someone who treated those around him with kindness and who did his best to make the world a little bit better for his patients, his community and beyond.

AS: I hope to be remembered by my classmates and by my patients for the things I’ve taught them throughout this journey. After all, “doctor” is the Latin word for “teacher.”

What are your plans for the future?

AL: I hope to be a physician-historian and pursue a career that combines patient care with research in the history of medicine.

AS: My goal is to subspecialize within internal medicine and assume a teaching role at an academic medical center. I’d love to continue providing care to patients and, along the way, educate them and a new generation of medical trainees.

Tell me something interesting about yourself that makes you unique.

AL: During medical school, I wrote a book based on my doctoral dissertation. It’s a history of early efforts to computerize medical diagnosis, and is currently under contract for publication with the Johns Hopkins University Press.

AS: In my third year of medical school, I created a medical podcast called Beyond the Buzzwords! It’s targeted toward medical students preparing for USMLE Step 2, and has so far reached over 8,000 listeners around the world.

Andrew Lea matched to Brigham and Women's Hospital for Internal Medicine.
Andrew Supron matched to Brigham and Women's Hospital for Internal Medicine.


Alexa Mullins

Alexa Mullins

Where is your hometown?

Houston, Texas

What made you want to enter the medical field?

When I was growing up, my grandparents lived right down the street from us. My grandfather was the first doctor in my family, and sitting around the table at holidays or at impromptu visits to their house, I heard story after story about his journey in medicine. What stuck with me the most was his immense impact on our community. He was famous for packed waiting rooms and long waiting times, but people waited to see him because when it was their turn, his gentle spirit and clear compassion made people feel deeply and genuinely seen, heard and cared for. In thinking about what I wanted to do in my own career, I wanted to grow up and do exactly what my grandfather did — serving minority communities, providing compassionate care, and inspiring the next generation to pursue their dreams.

Why did you choose the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine?

Hopkins was the perfect combination of phenomenal mentors, innumerable research opportunities, and excellent clinical training that would teach me how to think about and share decisions with patients in the context of their environments, experiences, culture and broader personhood. As an African American woman, Baltimore was a place that would not only allow me to engage with and learn from the stories of diverse populations, but also specifically have opportunities to serve patients who looked like me.

What is your focus area of study?

Pediatrics

What has been your best/most memorable experience while at Johns Hopkins?

Some of my favorite memories at Hopkins have been seemingly small moments, from seeing an incredibly sick patient recover and beaming an ear-to-ear smile when talking about finally getting home to see their dog to eating powdered donuts with friends at the top of Fed Hill on a windy day with powdered sugar flying everywhere. 

What would you most like to be remembered for?

Though I have not achieved it yet, I want to be remembered for honoring the title “Dr. Mullins” created by my grandfather’s legacy. I hope that those who knew my grandfather see his gentle spirit, deep compassion and commitment to serving his patients and his community when they look at me.

What are your plans for the future?

Long term, I am interested in combining pediatric primary care in underserved communities, qualitative research and medical education. I hope to be able to teach and mentor students and stay connected to pipeline programs to specifically have opportunities to mentor students of color.

Tell me something interesting about yourself that makes you unique.

In my free time, I draw freehand with graphite pencils and create collages from magazine scraps. The graphite drawings make uniquely personalized gifts for family and friends. Some of the drawings I am most proud of are a toolbox I drew for a friend who works on cars and a drawing of my grandparents’ house, which I gave my dad for Christmas. From college to med school, my room has always been decorated with my collages (and a Doug the Pug calendar, which I repurchase annually).

Alexa matched to Children's Hospital - Philadelphia for Pediatrics.


Olive Tang

Olive Tang

Where is your hometown?

Boston, Massachusetts

What made you want to enter the medical field?

Being in medicine gives me this opportunity to be a part of so many people’s lives and to help them be able to focus on whatever other goals and aspirations they may have. Almost no one ever wants to be in the hospital, and yet, almost everyone will engage with the health care system. Growing up, I have seen how disparate both access and clinical care can be. In college, I had the chance to work with a clinic focused on caring for immigrant and disadvantaged populations, which was a tremendously rewarding experience. Having seen what the impact of a phenomenal physician might be on both the experience of a patient as well as their loved ones, it was an easy decision to make.

Why did you choose the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine?

As cliché as it may sound, the people and community left a lasting impression during my interview and Second Look. Everyone was so welcoming and truly seemed to care about each other. I was also applying to M.D./Ph.D. programs and interested in an environment that would provide me with rigorous training both in clinical care as well as research. Reflecting back, I feel so fortunate that Hopkins gave me this chance to train here. The people have been even more amazing than I could have expected — I have found lifelong friends, mentors and teammates who have been such tremendously generous supporters and sources of inspiration.

What is your focus area of study?

I’m hoping to go into critical care and am applying into anesthesiology.

What has been your best/most memorable experience while at Johns Hopkins?

There have been so many memorable experiences during my time at Hopkins. I met one of my closest friends on a Lyft ride to the airport after Second Look. I had the chance to be part of the founding group for the Distinguished Teaching Society, something that remains one of my favorite experiences as a student here. After starting, I made a pretty big change in the direction of my research and could not have done it without the remarkable support and encouragement of the wonderful community that is the Welch Center. I still marvel at the fact that they not only paid attention to this random medical student without any background in public health, but have been so generous and invested in me as a trainee. Last and certainly not least, my clinical training has been full of amazing stories and experiences that I will carry with me forever. My mentors have modeled for me what being a phenomenal physician entails, and shared with me a vision for what medicine can be. The patients at Hopkins come from such diverse communities and have been the most amazing (and patient) teachers, even though that was not the role they came to the hospital for.

What would you most like to be remembered for?

I hope I can become a compassionate and dependable physician and someone those around me can turn to and rely on.

What are your plans for the future?

I am an aspiring physician-scientist, and would like to stay at an academic center to have the opportunity to pursue clinical care, research and teaching. Clinically, I would like to become an intensivist, and am considering fellowships in critical care and cardiac anesthesia following residency. I would like to build upon my epidemiology training and pursue an interdisciplinary approach to leveraging population studies to inform and advance our clinical care. Someday, I would also like to spend some time with Doctors Without Borders.

Tell me something interesting about yourself that makes you unique.

I am not that interesting myself, but vicariously, my parents are first-generation immigrants, and I have an incredible younger brother who is a phenomenal golfer (in addition to so much else) and has competed professionally in junior leagues.

Olive matched to Johns Hopkins Hospital for Anesthesiology.

 

Where They're Going

152 students matched in twenty-six different states.

The top specialties include: Internal Medicine at #1 and Anesthesiology at #2; Ophthalmology at #3; Pediatrics at #4; and Psychiatry at #5.

 

Revisit Past Match Days

Meet the remarkable medical students from previous Match Days and learn what brought them to call Johns Hopkins their home.

  
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