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  • Johns Hopkins University Dermatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology (DACI) Reference Laboratory

    The mission of the Johns Hopkins University Dermatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology (DACI) Reference Laboratory is to provide comprehensive, high-quality diagnostic allergy and immunology testing to patients throughout North America with asthma, allergy and immunologic disorders. We offer an extensive menu of laboratory tests that includes allergen-specific IgE measurements to approximately 300 pollen, epidermal, mold spore, mite, food, drug, venom and occupational allergen specificities. We specialize in Hymenoptera (insect sting) venom-specific IgE and IgG antibody measurements. In addition, the DACI Laboratory performs hypersensitivity pneumonitis precipitin panels, serum cotinine, and environmental mold measurements.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Robert G. Hamilton, Ph.D., M.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Adamo Cardiac Immunology Lab

    Over the last few decades, a growing body of evidence has shown that the immune system is intimately connected with cardiac development, function and adaptation to injury. However, there is still much to learn and currently there are no immunomodulatory treatments to prevent or treat heart dysfunction. The Adamo Lab aims to study applied immunology in the context of cardiac function and dysfunction, to both elucidate fundamental properties of the immune systems and to develop novel therapeutic options for the rapidly growing number of patients living with heart disease.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Luigi Adamo, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • The Laboratory for Precision Immunology

    We are devoted to developing and deploying cutting edge technologies that can be used to define human immune responses. Much of our work leverages ‘next generation’ DNA sequencing, which enables massively parallel molecular measurements. Examples of our technologies include: - bacteriophage display of synthetic peptidome libraries for comprehensive, quantitative profiling of antibodies; - display of ORFeome libraries for antigen discovery, protein-protein interaction studies, and drug target identification; - ultrasensitive, multiplex RNA quantification techniques to monitor gene expression and detect microbes; - pooled genetic screening to elucidate immune cell function and identify new therapeutic targets. The Larman Laboratory uses these and other approaches to identify opportunities for monitoring and manipulating immune responses.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    H. Benjamin Larman, Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Andrew Lane Lab

    The Lane laboratory is focused on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying chronic rhinosinusitis, particularly the pathogenesis of nasal polyps, as well as inflammation on the olfactory epithelium. Diverse techniques in molecular biology, immunology, and physiology are utilized to study epithelial cell innate immunity, olfactory loss, and response to viral infection. Ongoing work explores how epithelial cells of the sinuses and olfactory mucosa participate in the immune response and contribute to chronic inflammation. The lab creates and employs transgenic mouse models of chronic nasal/sinus inflammation to support research in this area. Collaborations are in place with the School of Public Health to explore mechanisms of anti-viral immunity in influenza and COVID-19.

    Principal Investigator

    Andrew Lane, M.D.

    Department

    Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

  • Arturo Casadevall Lab

    The Arturo Casadevall Lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to explore two key topics within microbiology and immunology: how microbes cause disease and how hosts can protect themselves against those microbes. Much of our research focuses on the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, which frequently causes lung infections in people with impaired immunity. We also work with the microorganism Bacillus anthracis, a bacterium that causes anthrax and is frequently used in biological warfare. Our goal is to devise antibody-based countermeasures to protect against this and other similar threats.

    Principal Investigator

    Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jeff Bulte Lab

    The clinical development of novel immune and stem cell therapies calls for suitable methods that can follow the fate of cells non-invasively in humans at high resolution. The Bulte Lab has pioneered methods to label cells magnetically (using tiny superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles) in order to make them visible by MR imaging. While the lab is doing basic bench-type research, there is a strong interaction with the clinical interventional radiology and oncology groups in order to bring the methodologies into the clinic.
  • Jungsan Sohn

    Dr. Sohn's lab is interested in understanding how biological stress-sensors are assembled, detect danger signals and initiate stress response. Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens in higher eukaryotes. We are using in vitro quantitative biochemical assays and mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography to investigate the underlying operating principles of inflammasomes, a component of the innate immune system, to better understand biological stress sensors.
  • HPTN (HIV Prevention Trials Network) Network Lab

    HPTN (HIV Prevention Trials Network) Network Laboratory (NL) is responsible for collecting, testing and reporting results from biological samples; assisting in the development and quality assurance assessment of local laboratory capacity at the Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) participating in HPTN clinical trials (www.hptn.org); and identifying and implementing state-of-the-art assays and technologies to advance the scientific agenda of the Network.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Susan Henrietta Eshleman, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Clinical Laboratory and Biomarkers Core

    The Clinical Laboratory and Biomarkers Cores will coordinate access to laboratory expertise, testing, training, specimen repositories and Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP). The goals of this core are to assure that all JHU HIV investigators have access to and utilize appropriate, validated and, where applicable, certified laboratory assays. The core will also maintain a biomarker specimen repository for storage cataloguing and utilization of biological specimens.
    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Craig W. Hendrix, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sean T. Prigge Lab

    Current research in the Sean T. Prigge Lab explores the biochemical pathways found in the apicoplast, an essential organelle found in malaria parasites, using a combination of cell biology and genetic, biophysical and biochemical techniques. We are particularly focused on the pathways used for the biosynthesis and modification of fatty acids and associated enzyme cofactors, including pantothenate, lipoic acid, biotin and iron-sulfur clusters. We want to better understand how the cofactors are acquired and used, and whether they are essential for the growth of blood-stage malaria parasites.