In This Section      
 

Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

Topic

Exercise and Physical Fitness

Landmark Articles

  • To facilitate the guideline-based implementation of treatment recommendations in the ambulatory setting and to encourage participation in the multiple preventive health efforts that exist, we have organized several recent guideline updates into a simple ABCDEF approach. We would remind clinicians that evidence-based medicine is meant to inform recommendations but that synthesis of patient-specific data and use of appropriate clinical judgment in each individual situation is ultimately preferred.

    Read on Pubmed
  • Unhealthy lifestyle habits are a major contributor to coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations of smoking, weight maintenance, physical activity, and Mediterranean-style diet with coronary calcium, cardiovascular events, and mortality. We discovered that, over the course of nearly 8 years, a combination of regular exercise, healthy diet, smoking avoidance, and weight maintenance contributed to lower coronary calcium incidence, slower calcium progression, and lower all-cause mortality.
    Read on Pubmed
  • Much attention has been directed toward lifestyle modifications as effective means of reducing cardiovascular disease risk. We review recent observational and interventional trials investigating the effects of physical activity on markers of (or causal factors for) atherosclerotic burden and vascular disease. There is a strong correlation between physical activity and triglyceride reduction, apolipoprotein B reduction, HDL increase, change in LDL particle size, increase in tissue plasminogen activator activity, and decrease in CAC. Further research is needed to elucidate the effect on inflammatory markers and intima-media thickness.
    Read on Pubmed
Exercise and physical activity for cardiovascular disease prevention.
By: Ahmed H, Ndumele CE.
A systematic review of internet-based worksite wellness approaches for cardiovascular disease risk management: outcomes, challenges and opportunities.
By: Aneni EC, Roberson LL, Maziak W, Agatston AS, Feldman T, Rouseff M, Tran TH, Blumenthal RS, Blaha MJ, Blankstein R, Al-Mallah MH, Budoff MJ, Nasir K.
Internet-based programs hold promise for improving the cardiovascular wellness among employees. However, much work is required to fully understand its utility and long-term impact, especially in special/at-risk populations.
Read on Pubmed
Beyond BMI: the "metabolically healthy obese" phenotype and its association with clinical/subclinical cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality: a systematic review.
By: Roberson LL, Aneni EC, Maziak W, Agatston A, Feldman T, Rouseff M, Tran T, Blaha MJ, Santos RD, Sposito A, Al-Mallah MH, Blankstein R, Budoff MJ, Nasir K.

This review analyzed the literature that has examined the burden of CVD and all-cause mortality in the metabolically healthy obese population.

Read on Pubmed
Prevalence and prognostic significance of exercise-induced non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in asymptomatic volunteers: The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.
By: Marine JE, Shetty V, Chow GV, Wright J, Gerstenblith G, Najjar SS, Lakatta EG, Fleg JL.
This longitudinal cohort analysis suggests that brief asymptomatic runs of exercise-induced non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, in the absence of clinical heart disease, are not uncommon in men, older adults, and those with hypertension, but are not associated with increased mortality after adjusting for baseline risk factors. These findings do not necessarily apply to patients with known structural heart disease.
Read on Pubmed
Low-risk lifestyle, coronary calcium, cardiovascular events, and mortality: Results from MESA.
By: Ahmed HM, Blaha MJ, Nasir K, Jones SR, Rivera JJ, Agatston A, Blankstein R, Wong ND, Lakoski S, Budoff MJ, Burke GL, Sibley CT, Ouyang P, Blumenthal RS.
Unhealthy lifestyle habits are a major contributor to coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations of smoking, weight maintenance, physical activity, and Mediterranean-style diet with coronary calcium, cardiovascular events, and mortality. We discovered that, over the course of nearly 8 years, a combination of regular exercise, healthy diet, smoking avoidance, and weight maintenance contributed to lower coronary calcium incidence, slower calcium progression, and lower all-cause mortality.
Read on Pubmed
Diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction for reduction of cardiovascular risk.
By: Nehra A, Jackson G, Miner M, Billups KL, Burnett AL, et al.
Erectile dysfunction is a marker of increased cardiovascular risk in younger men and in men with diabetes. Lifestyle improvements and treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension are very important to lower cardiovascular risk.
Read on Pubmed
Impact of fitness versus obesity on routinely measured cardiometabolic risk in young, healthy adults.
By: Vranian MN, Keenan T, Blaha MJ, Silverman MG, Michos ED, Minder CM, Blumenthal RS, Nasir K, Meneghelo RS, Santos RD.
Although fitness and obesity are independently associated with cardiometabolic risk, and their effects are additive, obesity is more strongly associated with this risk when fitness and obesity are discordant. These findings underscore the need for weight loss in obese patients and suggest an unmeasured benefit of fitness.
Read on Pubmed
Dyslipidemia management for secondary prevention in women with cardiovascular disease: What can we expect from non-pharmacologic strategies?
By: Whelton S, Chow GV, Ashen MD, Blumenthal RS.

In this review, we examine the effect of non-pharmacologic therapy (i.e., diet and lifestyle modification) on lipids as part of the secondary prevention strategy of cardiovascular disease in women.

Read on Pubmed
Coronary artery calcium and primary prevention risk assessment: What is the evidence? An updated meta-analysis on patient and physician behavior.
By: Whelton SP, Nasir K, Blaha MJ, Gransar H, Metkus TS, Coresh J, Berman DS, Blumenthal RS.

--

Read on Pubmed
A national interactive Web-based physical activity intervention in women, evaluation of the American Heart Association Choose to Move program 2006-2007.
By: Lieber SB, Redberg RF, Blumenthal RS, Gandhi A, Robb KJ, Mora S.
In this national cohort of women, a 12-week Web-based intervention improved physical activity and quality of life measurements, resulting in higher short-term physical activity guideline compliance and better quality of life. Increasing use of this simple Web-based tool could improve physical activity and promote disease prevention.
Read on Pubmed