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Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

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Surgery for Bedsores (Pressure Sores)

Bedsores, sometimes called pressure sores or decubitus ulcers, can develop in people who have been confined to bed for long periods of time, are unable to move for short periods of time, or who use a wheelchair or sit in one spot for long periods of time. Other complications, such as aging, circulation and decreased sensation, can increase the likelihood that a person will develop pressure sores. Hospital patients and nursing home residents, as well as those who are being cared for at home and who are confined to bed are most at risk to develop pressure sores.

What You Need to Know:

  • In their early stages, pressure sores can be treated non-surgically.
  • Left untreated, bedsores can lead to dangerous medical complications like bone, blood or bacterial infections in a joint.
  • If the bedsore has progressed to the point that the ulcer has gone deeper than the skin surface and is affecting bone and tendon, surgery may be the best treatment. 
  • The reconstructive surgeons at Johns Hopkins can diagnose the problem and recommend appropriate reconstruction.

Patient Resources

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Why choose Johns Hopkins?

At Johns Hopkins, our plastic surgeons have done thousands of reconstructive and plastic surgeries to restore appearance and functionality. They have learned about and, in many cases, taught the latest and most effective surgical techniques. In addition, because they work at Johns Hopkins, they can call on any other kind of medical expertise needed right at the facility, from orthopedists and oncologists to pediatricians and dermatologists.

Our reconstructive surgeons in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, located in Baltimore, Maryland, are devoted to their profession and that includes consultation with the patients, their families, and others as needed. From the first consultation to the final check-up, they make themselves available and accessible to patients.

Our Surgeons

Photo of Dr. Julie Ann Caffrey, D.O., M.S.

Caffrey, Julie Ann, D.O., M.S.

Assistant Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Assistant Professor of Surgery
 
Photo of Dr. Richard James Redett, III, M.D.

Redett, Richard James, M.D. III

Associate Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Co-Director, Brachial Plexus Clinic, Kennedy Krieger Institute
Director, Cleft Lip and Palate Center
Director, Facial Paralysis and Pain Center
Director, Pediatric Plastic Surgery
Clinical Director, Genitourinary Transplant Program