In This Section      
 

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Awarded $1.7 Million Grant to Fund Programs for Young Women with Breast Cancer - 10/20/2014

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Awarded $1.7 Million Grant to Fund Programs for Young Women with Breast Cancer

Release Date: October 20, 2014

Fast Facts:

  • A $1.7 million, five-year grant has been awarded by the CDC to the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
  • The grant will fund educational programs, enhance support and increase awareness for young women diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • 11 percent of women diagnosed with breast cancer are under the age of 45.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) has awarded the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Program a $1.7 million grant over five years to fund educational programs, enhance support and increase awareness for young women diagnosed with breast cancer.
 
In 2014, an anticipated 230,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, with approximately 11 percent of those diagnosed under the age of 45. While a breast cancer diagnosis is difficult for any woman, younger women diagnosed with breast cancer often have higher levels of distress; issues related to genetic testing; increased concerns surrounding body image, dating, childbearing and fertility; more lifestyle disruptions; and long-term survivorship needs. 
 
As one of the largest and most comprehensive multidisciplinary programs in the state of Maryland, the Breast Cancer Program will use the funds from this grant to meet common challenges for young breast cancer survivors and their families. “We have recognized the urgent need for a specialty clinic for young women diagnosed with breast cancer, as their needs are unique and must be addressed in a dedicated and coordinated way,” explains Vered Stearns, M.D., professor of oncology and co-director of the Breast Cancer Program. “The funds provided by the CDC will allow us to extend our pilot efforts to reach a larger proportion of young women in more comprehensive ways, providing not only treatment of their disease, but also care for them as individuals — whether they’re going to school, building careers or raising families. We are looking forward to serving young women throughout the Baltimore–Washington area as we expand our young women’s program to all Johns Hopkins campuses.”
 
The funds provided by the CDC will be used by the Breast Cancer Program to assemble education materials, enhance delivery of care for patients, develop individualized prescriptions for wellness and implement research discoveries for young women with breast cancer to reduce overall breast cancer death rates.
 
Pamela Protzel Berman, acting director of the DCPC, says of the new effort: “We are excited about partnering with the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and this new group of grantees to provide much needed support to young women living with breast cancer. Their efforts will address a broad range of education, resources and communication needs that have been identified as common challenges for young breast cancer survivors and their families. We look forward to working with our new grantees to serve these women.”
 
The DCPC is working to increase awareness of breast cancer and to improve the health and quality of life for young breast cancer survivors and young women who are at higher risk of getting breast cancer.
 
On the Web:
 
Read more about the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Program.
 
# # #
 

For the Media

Contacts:

Michelle Potter
410-614-2914
mpotter8@jhmi.edu