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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: April 20, 2018


Often people think performing in front of others will make them mess up, but a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist found the opposite: being watched makes people do better.

Released: April 19, 2018


Five Johns Hopkins scientists, with specialties spanning computation, genetics, statistics and engineering, are among 83 others from 53 institutions in the U.S and eight other countries, who will share in a $15 million award from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

Released: April 19, 2018


Johns Hopkins scientist Steven Salzberg, Ph.D., known for his ability to tackle the most difficult projects in genome sequencing, has been elected as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He joins the group of 213 scientists, scholars, writers, artists and other leaders, including former President Barack Obama and Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who make up the class of 2018.

Released: April 18, 2018


In a new analysis of interviews conducted with children who have asthma, their caregivers and their clinicians, Johns Hopkins researchers found that there was significant lack of agreement about why the kids miss their needed daily anti-inflammatory medication.

Released: April 18, 2018


Using computer models and laboratory rats, Johns Hopkins researchers have demonstrated that “direct electrical current” can be delivered to nerves preferentially, blocking pain signals while leaving other sensations undisturbed.

Released: April 16, 2018


A drug given to early stage lung cancer patients before they undergo surgery showed major tumor responses in the removed tumor and an increase in anti-tumor T-cells that remained after the tumor was removed, which resulted in fewer relapse cases in the patients.

Released: April 16, 2018


A new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis of national trauma data shows that trauma patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds and nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared with rates in 2007.

Released: April 16, 2018


In a multicenter database study of adults who had undergone surgery for spinal deformities, researchers say that those who had used narcotics daily on average had worse outcomes, such as longer intensive care unit stays and more severe postop disability, compared with those who did not use opioids preoperatively.

Released: April 12, 2018


The Johns Hopkins Center for Dynamic Health is hosting a symposium on the science of exercise as medicine. This inaugural event will feature talks from leading experts from Johns Hopkins Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and other neighboring institutions. The symposium will discuss research about physical activity and exercise as well as clinical activities.  

Released: April 10, 2018


Adding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab—already used to treat certain breast cancers—to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value.

Released: April 5, 2018


In a review article published April 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientist Andrew Feinberg, M.D., calls for more integration between two fields of DNA-based research: genetics and epigenetics.

Released: April 5, 2018


In a mouse study, a drug that has helped millions of people around the world manage their diabetes might also help people ready to kick their nicotine habits.

Released: April 2, 2018


In the tiny brain space where two nerve cells meet, chemical and electric signals shuttle back and forth, a messaging system that ebbs and flows in those synaptic spaces, sometimes in ways that scientists believe aid and abet learning and memory. But because most of the proteins found in those synapses die and renew themselves so rapidly, scientists have had a hard time pinning down how synapses are stable enough to explain the kind of learning and memory that lasts a lifetime. 

Released: April 2, 2018


As part of the Maryland Trauma System distracted driving awareness statewide initiative for Distracted Driving Awareness Month, some Johns Hopkins Health System trauma centers will host events to educate people about the dangers of distracted driving. The events are free and open to the public.

Released: March 29, 2018

As part of a statewide campaign, Johns Hopkins leadership, clinicians, families of donors and recipients to raise ‘Donate Life’ flag to honor organ, eye and tissue donors


Throughout the month of April, in celebration of National Donate Life Month, The Johns Hopkins Hospital will fly the Donate Life flag to show solidarity for the importance of organ donation.

 

Released: March 28, 2018


By modifying a muscle transplant operation, Johns Hopkins surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy¾wide and even smiles¾to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due to birth defects, stroke, tumors or Bell’s palsy.  

Released: March 27, 2018


Working with cells that line the innermost layer of the blood vessels, Johns Hopkins investigators say they have made a leap forward in understanding the underlying biology behind pulmonary hypertension, a dangerous type of high blood pressure in lungs that ultimately leads to right heart failure and death.

Released: March 26, 2018


By combining high-tech 3-D printing technology with everyday items such as a kickball and pieces of chicken breast, surgeons at Johns Hopkins report they have devised an innovative way to “rehearse” a complex minimally invasive surgical repair of open lesions on fetal spinal cords inside the womb.
 

Released: March 22, 2018


Researchers at The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test for urine, gathered during a routine procedure, to detect DNA mutations identified with urothelial cancers.

Released: March 22, 2018


Cervical fluid samples gathered during routine Papanicolaou (Pap) tests are the basis of a new screening test for endometrial and ovarian cancers developed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.