Skip Navigation

COVID-19 Update

Year in Review 2015

Year in Review 2015

Highlights from stories concerning the strategic priorities of Johns Hopkins Medicine

BIOMEDICAL DISCOVERY: The FDA granted breakthrough therapy status to pembrolizumab to treat patients with colon cancer who have certain alterations in so-called mismatch repair genes. The decision was prompted by research led by oncologists Dung Le and Luis Diaz at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center’s Swim Across America Laboratory.

 

BIOMEDICAL DISCOVERY: The FDA granted breakthrough therapy status to pembrolizumab to treat patients with colon cancer who have certain alterations in so-called mismatch repair genes. The decision was prompted by research led by oncologists Dung Le and Luis Diaz at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center’s Swim Across America Laboratory.

 

Year in review: People.

 

PEOPLE: MERIT (Medical Education Resources Initiative for Teens) provides learning experiences and opportunities to young people in Baltimore City public high schools. It’s one of many community-focused mentoring programs. 

 

Year in review: Education.

 

EDUCATION: A new professorship devoted to primary care will lead efforts to strengthen interest in the field across medicine, nursing and public health. Drawing on the legacy of William Osler (The Johns Hopkins Hospital’s first head of medicine), John Flynn, Maura McGuire and Steve Kravet are among those leading the change.

 

Year in review: Integration.

 

INTEGRATION: After the April 27 unrest in Baltimore, Harriet Lane Clinic clinicians used Epic, the electronic medical record system, to reach patients whose pharmacies were destroyed by looting.

 

Year in review: Performance.

 

PERFORMANCE: A collaboration between spinal surgeons and Johns Hopkins’ purchasing department will save $3.3 million annually for Johns Hopkins Medicine. It’s one of many supply chain initiatives that has reduced costs substantially.

 

Year in review: patient and family centered care.

 

PATIENT- AND FAMILY-CENTERED CARE: Seventy-two case workers located throughout Maryland help manage the illnesses of roughly 5,000 people enrolled in the insurance plans managed by Johns Hopkins HealthCare.

back to top button