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John Hundt Honored for Volunteerism, Mentorship in East Baltimore

John Hundt Honored for Volunteerism, Mentorship in East Baltimore

To celebrate Hundt’s achievements, Baltimore City made a ceremonial street sign in his name.

Principled. Generous. Kind. Compassionate. Humble.

These are the words friends and colleagues use to describe John Hundt, chief administrative officer of surgical services for The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Hundt was honored in June for 27 years of service to Johns Hopkins and for his contributions to Baltimore charities, for his board memberships and for his volunteerism. To celebrate these achievements, Baltimore City installed a red ceremonial street sign that says John Hundt Way in Eager Park at the corner of Ashland Avenue and Wolfe Street.

“It was very fitting,” says Charles Reuland, executive vice president and chief operating officer of The Johns Hopkins Hospital, who has worked with Hundt for many years. “He has certainly walked the walk of being committed to the community in every possible way.”

Kenneth Brown-Wilson, assistant director of operations for the Johns Hopkins Surgery Centers Series who was mentored by Hundt, commissioned the sign to thank Hundt for all his contributions.

“John is always willing to help,” Brown-Wilson says. “He’s always thinking about the community and how to improve it. John lives near Eager Park and walks to work every day. He picks up any trash he sees. Not a lot of people would stop to do that. He says if he starts the example, maybe it will inspire other people to do the same.”

Hundt is a board member and the treasurer of the Historic East Baltimore Community Action Coalition (HEBCAC), a nonprofit group created to enhance the quality of life for people who live, work and visit in East Baltimore. He is also a member of the Eager Park Neighborhood Association and a Habitat for Humanity volunteer. He has been a member of the Johns Hopkins Neighborhood Fund committee for more than a decade, and he is the board chair for the Living Legacy Foundation, a local organ procurement organization.

Hundt says he’s a little embarrassed by the street sign recognition, but he’s also appreciative.

“I try to invest in the city, shop in the city and promote the city as much as I can,” Hundt says.

Hundt also spends much time mentoring. He has mentored students at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, and he advises Johns Hopkins administrative fellows and other young administrators through the National Association of Health Service Executives, which promotes advancement and development of Black health care leaders.

“It’s energizing working with young people who aspire to careers in health care,” Hundt says.

When HEBCAC lost most of its funding for Dee’s Place, a long-standing substance use recovery program, Hundt joined a work group to raise alternative funding and keep the doors open. He then spearheaded an effort to raise funds for a mural on the side of the building that houses Dee’s Place.

“I believe the clients of Dee’s Place deserve a more bright and friendly entry to their program,” Hundt says.

Jeff Thompson, HEBCAC’s deputy director, says when Hundt joined the board, he jumped right in and was incredibly helpful.

“He gives an enormous amount of time helping us work through financial matters,” Thompson says. “He’s always thinking about ways that we can get better connected to resources at the Johns Hopkins hospital or the university.”

Hundt says he’s inspired to live up to the celebration of his achievements.

“I know that our city government can’t fix everything,” he says. “I care about my neighborhood and I care about the families who live here. I believe in Baltimore.”

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