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Types of Lymphoma

Hodgkin Lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma is diagnosed by the presence of Reed-Sternberg cells, which comes from an abnormal B lymphocyte (white blood cell). Hodgkin lymphoma is most common in young adults ages 16 to 34 and in older people ages 55 and older.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas come from either abnormal white blood cells called B cells or T cells. Different kinds of non-Hodgkin lymphomas may have specific genetic markers and are usually associated with chromosome abnormalities. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas are most likely to occur in people age 55 and older.

Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is a fast-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects a type of white blood cell called B-lymphocytes.

Follicular Lymphoma

Follicular lymphoma is a very slow-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects a type of white blood cell called B lymphocytes.

High Grade B-Cell Lymphoma

High-grade B-cell lymphoma is a fast-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects B cells and shows rearrangements in the MYC gene or BCL2 or BCL6 genes.

Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

Peripheral T-cell lymphoma is a set of fast-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects two types of white blood cells called T cells and natural killer (NK) cells.

Cutaneous Lymphoma

Cutaneous lymphomas are mostly slow-growing non-Hodgkin lymphomas that appear on the skin with no evidence of disease outside the skin. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas start in white blood cells called B lymphocytes. Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas start in white blood cells called T cells can involve the skin, blood, lymph nodes, and other organs.

HIV-Associated Lymphoma

HIV-associated lymphoma occurs when cancer cells affect the lymph system after HIV infection. These lymphomas can be Hodgkin but are most often non-Hodgkin variety, with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and a B-cell lymphoma called Burkitt or Burkitt-like lymphoma. Johns Hopkins’ Richard Ambinder, M.D, is one of the world's leading experts on HIV-associated cancers

Post-Transplant Lymphoma

Post-transplant lymphomas can occur after transplant of a solid organ like a kidney, lung, liver, or heart, or after some bone marrow or stem cell transplantation. The lymphoma is thought to be caused by the infection of B-cells with the Epstein-Barr virus.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer that affects white blood cells primarily in the bone marrow and bloodstream, although the lymph system and spleen may also be involved.

Transplant and Cellular Therapies Including CAR-T Therapies

Bone marrow or blood cell transplant may involve a patient’s own marrow or blood cells or those of a donor. Cellular therapies may involve genetically engineered T cells that have been programmed to specifically attack tumor cells such as CAR-T cells.

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