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Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

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Cardiac CT

Landmark Articles

Associations of Pentraxin 3 with cardiovascular disease: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
By: Jenny NS, Blumenthal RS, Kronmal RA, Rotter JI, Siscovick DS, Psaty BM.
In a study of apparently healthy adults, Pentraxin 3 was associated with CVD risk factors, subclinical CVD, CAC and incident coronary heart disease events independent of C-reactive protein (CRP) and CVD risk factors. These results support the hypothesis that PTX3 reflects different aspects of inflammation than CRP and may provide additional insight into the development and progression of atherosclerosis.
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Coronary artery calcium and physical fitness — the two best predictors of long-term survival.
By: Blaha MJ, Feldman DI, Nasir K.
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Comparing coronary artery calcium among U.S. South Asians with four racial/ethnic groups: the MASALA and MESA studies.
By: Kanaya AM, Kandula NR, Ewing SK, Herrington D, Liu K, Blaha MJ, Srivastava S, Dave SS, Budoff MJ.
A high burden of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in South Asians may partly explain higher rates of cardiovascular disease in South Asians.
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Epicardial fat is associated with duration of antiretroviral therapy and coronary atherosclerosis.
By: Brener M, Ketlogetswe K, Budoff M, Jacobson LP, Li X, Rezaeian P, Razipour A, Palella FJ Jr, Kingsley L, Witt MD, George RT, Post WS.
Greater epicardial fat volume in HIV-infected men and its association with coronary plaque and antiretroviral therapy duration suggest potential mechanisms that might lead to increased risk for cardiovascular disease in HIV.
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Usefulness of coronary and carotid imaging rather than traditional atherosclerotic risk factors to identify firefighters at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.
By: Ratchford EV, Carson KA, Jones SR, Ashen MD.
Early detection and integration of imaging with traditional risk assessment will be important in preventing premature death and disability among firefighters.
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Screening low-risk individuals for coronary artery disease.
By: Desai CS, Blumenthal RS, Greenland P.
Data regarding the role of additional testing in low-risk populations to improve early detection or to enhance risk assessment indicate that CAC and the ankle-brachial index (ABI) may be helpful for improving risk classification and detecting the higher-risk people from among those at lower risk.
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Ethnic and sex differences in fatty liver on cardiac computed tomography: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.
By: Tota-Maharaj R, Blaha MJ, Zeb I, Katz R, Blankstein R, Blumenthal RS, Budoff MJ, Nasir K.
African-Americans have a lower prevalence, and Hispanics have a higher prevalence, of fatty liver than do other ethnicities. There are distinct ethnic variations in the prevalence of fatty liver even in patients with the metabolic syndrome or obesity, suggesting that genetic factors may play a substantial role in the phenotypic expression of fatty liver.
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Ten-year trends in coronary calcification in individuals without clinical cardiovascular disease in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.
By: Bild DE, McClelland R, Kaufman JD, Blumenthal R, Burke GL, Carr JJ, Post WS, Register TC, Shea S, Szklo M.

Researchers reported a significant secular trend toward increased prevalence of CAC over 10 years among African-Americans and no change in three other ethnic groups..

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Risk and the physics of clinical prediction.
By: McEvoy JW, Diamond GA, Detrano RC, Kaul S, Blaha MJ, Blumenthal RS, Jones SR.
This study shifts the focus from prediction of events to detection of disease in the effort to improve personalized decision-making and outcomes. It also discusses innovative future strategies for risk estimation and treatment allocation in preventive cardiology.
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Associations between HIV infection and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis.
By: Post WS, Budoff M, Kingsley L, Palella FJ Jr, Witt MD, Li X, George RT, Brown TT, Jacobson LP.
Coronary artery plaque, especially noncalcified plaque, is more prevalent and extensive in HIV-infected men, independent of CAD risk factors.
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