Skip Navigation
 
 
 
 
 
Print This Page
Share this page: More
 

Mammogram and Ultrasound

View Breast Health Seminars

Breast Wellness Videos

All the Best for Your Breasts
(mammography recommendations and breast health guidelines)

  • Lisa Jacobs, M.D., Johns Hopkins surgical oncologist and Director of the Breast Center at HCGH
Screening Techniques and Needle Biopsy
  • Susan Harvey, M.D., Director of Breast Imaging, Johns Hopkins at Green Spring Station
Breast Cancer Genetics: High Versus Low Risk
  • Jennifer Axilbund, M.S., Certified Genetic Counselor
Mammography Guidelines
  • June Reynolds, Mammography Coordinator

Digital Mammograms play a critical role in the early screening and diagnosing of breast diseases because mammograms have the ability to show changes in breast tissue prior to a patient or physician’s ability to feel them. Our state of the art digital mammography equipment allows physicians to view images in real time and examine the breast in greater detail. Digital mammograms have been shown to be more accurate at detecting tumors than older analog technology.

Screening Mammogram

We offer a 15-minute screening mammogram service with little or no wait time. Our imaging services are performed in the Health Care and Surgery Center, next to the hospital. Two films are done on each breast – a view from the top and one from the side. The breast is compressed by a paddle to reduce movement, minimize blurring and reduce the amount of x-rays. A radiologist will read the films and prepare a report for the patient's physician and the patient will receive a letter with the results. If we need to review results, a doctor will call the patient. Women should have a screening mammogram at age 35 to provide a baseline and then every year beginning at age 40.

Diagnostic Mammogram

If a screening mammogram detects an abnormality, the patient is usually called back for a diagnostic mammogram to take additional films that magnify the area or spot in question. Patients may also have a diagnostic mammogram to monitor an abnormality seen on a prior mammogram or if they have breast implants, which need to be "pushed back" to obtain an adequate film. Patients experiencing symptoms such as pain, discharge from the nipple or a lump may also need a diagnostic mammogram. The radiologist immediately reads the film and the results are reviewed with the patient.

Mammogram and Ultrasound
June Reynolds and Faye Dixon

Breast Ultrasound

A breast ultrasound is usually a follow-up to a mammogram when the radiologist detects an abnormality or when a lump is felt in the breast. Approximately 5-15 percent of women are called back for additional imaging and most of the time, the findings are benign. A transducer runs over the breast area, sending and receiving sound waves to form a picture on the screen. A radiologist reviews the images and the results are discussed with the patient.

Needle Localization by Mammography

This type of mammogram is for areas of the breast that are difficult to locate by feel or abnormal areas found during a diagnostic mammography. Under local anesthesia, a needle is inserted in the area to be examined. A fine wire is inserted through the needle so that it catches in the breast tissue. The needle is removed and the wire is left in place. A surgeon then removes tissue for imaging by radiology. The procedure may leave a small scar and the patient may have to limit activities for several days until the area heals.

Accepted Insurance

The HCGH/JHM Breast Center currently participates with the following insurance carriers:

Aetna PPO products (Elect, Managed and Open Choice)
OneNet (formerly Alliance PPO, part of United HealthCare)
Americhoice MCO (now called United Healthcare Community Plan)
Carefirst BCBS POS
CIGNA HMO
CIGNA PPO
EHP
InforMed - Frederick Health Plan
Tricare/HealthNet
Tricare USFHP
United Healthcare

Please note:
The HCGH/JHM Breast Center does not accept all insurance plans, including one available to some HCGH employees. Please call to check if your plan is accepted.


To schedule an appointment, please call 410-720-8130.

 

Having a Baby?

Having a Baby Learn everything you need to know about having your baby at HCGH and view a virtual tour.
 

Preparing for Surgery

Learn what to expect, where to go, and how to prepare for a surgical procedure at HCGH. 
 

Servicios en Español

Una guía en español a todos los servicios que HCGH brinda para mejorar la salud de toda nuestra communidad.
 

Make a Gift

Make a Gift

 
 
 
 
 

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer