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Wilmer Continuing Medical Education

Thank you for your interest in our CME lectures. Below you will find a list of upcoming courses and teaching conferences, as well as archived lectures. You may register by clicking on the links provided. For more information, contact the Hopkins CME office.
 

October 11, 2013

What's New in Diabetic Retinopathy and Venous Occlusive Disease?
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Turner Auditorium
Director: Sharon Solomon, M.D.
 

November 15, 2013

Optimal Management of Neovascular AMD: When to Treat? What to Treat? How to Treat?
New Orleans, LA
Director: Howard Ying, M.D., Ph.D.
 

December 5-7, 2013

26th Annual Current Concepts in Ophthalmology
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Turner Auditorium
Director: Walter Stark, M.D.
 

March 9-14, 2014

31st Annual Current Concepts in Ophthalmology
Vail, Colorado
Director: Walter Stark, M.D.
 

April 25, 2014

Neuro-Ophthalmology for the Clinician: A Practical Approach
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Turner Auditorium
Director: Neil Miller, M.D.


Regularly Scheduled Conferences

The Wilmer Retina Division Weekly Medical/Surgical Teaching Conference - Through case presentations involving fundus photographs, fluorescein angiograms, optical coherence tomograms, and other images of the retina, an update is provided on understanding the differential diagnosis of retinal diseases and their management. Treatment recommendations are discussed using an evidence-based medicine approach.


CME Enduring Materials/Podcasts

Please choose the course you are interested in listening to and viewing by clicking on one of the links below.

Macula 2013
Saturday, January 19, 2013
With the availability of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, there has been a dramatic change in the management of choroidal neovascularization due to age-related macular degeneration and similar pathologies, diabetic retinopathy and related conditions, and retinal vein occlusions. Intraocular oncology topics and vitreoretinal surgical treatments including laser, intravitreal drug injection, and vitreoretinal surgery also will be reviewed, with specific reference to retinal detachment surgery and vitreomacular interface abnormalities. Furthermore, the role of imaging studies, especially optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence, in the management of these ocular conditions will be reviewed. Case presentations will be chosen to emphasize new information on the use of pharmacologic agents, laser, and vitreoretinal surgery in the management of these diseases.

Click on the link below to view/listen to one or more of the lectures from this course and download an audio podcast of the lecture.
View lectures from this course

What’s New in Diabetic Retinopathy & Venous Occlusive Disease?
Friday, October 12, 2012
The total number of people worldwide with diabetes mellitus is projected to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. In the United States, almost 24 million or 8 percent of the population has diabetes mellitus. Approximately 4.0 million Americans age 40 and older have diabetic retinopathy, 900,000 of whom have vision threatening disease, defined as severe non-proliferative or proliferative diabetic retinopathy, macular edema, or both. Diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness in adults who make up the work force. Despite this, diabetic retinopathy and venous occlusive disease are often under-diagnosed and under-treated. This annual course highlights new information being reported by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network and others, which will impact current standard care and management strategies.

Click on the link below to view/listen to one or more of the lectures from this course and download an audio podcast of the lecture.
View lectures from this course

If you would like a CME certificate for this activity, you must first register and pay a $35 fee (one fee per course, whether you listen to all of the lectures for 6.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, just one lecture.) Once registered, you will be required to complete a course evaluation, and take a post test.

A Certificate of Attendance will be given upon passing the post-test with a score of at least 70% or better. Registrations will not be accepted after November 30, 2013.

Click on the link below to navigate to the Hopkins CME page for this course to proceed.
Go to the Hopkins CME Web Site

Age-Related Macular Degeneration in 2012: The Paradigm Continues to Evolve
Saturday, June 9, 2012
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can be a progressive disease that leads to vision impairment. Advanced AMD (either untreated neovascular AMD or geographic atrophy involving the foveal center) is responsible for severe visual acuity loss. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors such as ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept have been shown in randomized clinical trials to have biologic activity in the treatment of neovascular AMD. Clinical trials have shown that ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept can improve vision by 15 or more letters in approximately 35% of patients and stabilize vision in over 90% of patients. The optimal treatment regimen and frequency of follow-up for neovascular AMD is still under investigation. Many ophthalmologists evaluate and treat patients with neovascular AMD on an "as needed" basis; however, clinical trials have shown that the best visual acuity outcomes are attained with either: monthly treatment with either ranibizumab or bevacizumab for at least a 1 year period, as needed treatment with ranibizumab with monthly follow-up and evaluation, or monthly or every 8 week dosing of aflibercept. Ophthalmologists need to understand the benefits and potential limitations of different treatment regimens. In addition, new therapies for non-neovascular AMD are under investigation to halt progression of geographic atrophy. Furthermore, new imaging modalities are available to evaluate neovascular and non-neovascular AMD. There is a need to understand these new tools for assessing AMD activity. Therapeutic approaches for neovascular AMD are continuing to evolve and should be an area of great interest both to ophthalmologists who treat AMD and to those who refer these cases for further management.

Click on the link below to view/listen to one or more of the lectures from this course and download an audio podcast of the lecture.
View lectures from this course

What’s New in Diabetic Retinopathy & Venous Occlusive Disease?
November 11, 2011
The total number of people worldwide with diabetes mellitus is projected to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. In the United States, almost 24 million or 8 percent of the population has diabetes mellitus. Approximately 4.0 million Americans age 40 and older have diabetic retinopathy, 900,000 of whom have vision threatening disease, defined as pre-proliferative retinopathy, macular edema, or both. Diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness in adults who make up the work force. Despite this, diabetic retinopathy and venous occlusive disease are often under-diagnosed and under-treated. This annual course highlights new information being reported by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network and others, which will impact current standard care and management strategies. Outcomes data confirming the superiority of ranibizumab over traditional laser therapy in the management of diabetic macular edema will also be reviewed.

Click on the link below to view/listen to one or more of the lectures from this course and download an audio podcast of the lecture.
View lectures from this course

What’s New in Diabetic Retinopathy & Venous Occlusive Disease?
December 11, 2010
The total number of people worldwide with diabetes is projected to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. In the United States, almost 24 million or 8 percent of the population has diabetes mellitus. Approximately 4.0 million Americans age 40 and older have diabetic retinopathy, 900,000 of whom have vision-threatening disease, defined as pre-proliferative retinopathy, macular edema, or both. Diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness in adults who make up the work force. Despite this, diabetic retinopathy and venous occlusive disease are often under-diagnosed and under-treated. This annual course highlights new information being reported by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network and others, which will impact current standard of care and management strategies. New potential treatment options for patients with these disorders also will be reviewed. Outcomes data confirming the superiority of ranibizumab over traditional laser therapy in the management of diabetic macular edema will be reviewed.

Click on the link below to view/listen to one or more of the lectures from this course and download an audio podcast of the lecture.

Macula 2010
January 23, 2010
Over the past several years, there is a growing body of medical evidence that demonstrates a clear biologic rationale for targeting vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) in the treatment of neovascular AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and venous occlusive disease. This area of investigation is relatively new, and most ophthalmologists are not aware of the myriad growth factors and their potential role in AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and venous occlusive disease. There is a need to understand these new tools for assessing outcomes and also to understand data based on visual acuity loss measurements from clinical trials of these new agents. Furthermore, it is important to review the role of imaging studies, especially optical coherence tomography, in the management of these ocular conditions. Thus, this new therapeutic approach for neovascular AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and venous occlusive disease has been evolving over the past three years and is an area of great interest both to ophthalmologists who treat these diseases and to those who refer these cases for further management. Presentations will be chosen to emphasize new information on the use of VEGF inhibitors and pharmacologic agents in the management of these diseases. In addition, cases will be chosen which highlight new information being reported by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network and other randomized clinical trials.

What’s New in Diabetic Retinopathy and Venous Occlusive Disease?
November 20, 2009
This annual activity highlights new information being reported by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network and others that impacts current standard care and management strategies.

What’s New in Diabetic Retinopathy and Venous Occlusive Disease?
December 6, 2008
This course highlights current best management strategies as well as introduces new treatment options for patients with these disorders.

Click on the link below to view/listen to one or more of the lectures from this course and download an audio podcast of the lecture.
View lectures from this course

Age-Related Macular Degeneration in 2009: The Paradigm Continues to Evolve
June 13, 2009
This course highlights best management strategies as well as introduces new treatment options for patients with age-related macular degeneration.

 

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