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Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center

Featured on CBS This Morning - Dec 6, 2012  Watch video clip   |   Read JHMI News Release

Deep Brain Stimulation for Alzheimer's Disease

The ADvance Study is researching the use of a surgically implanted device that delivers mild electrical pulses to specific areas of the brain in people with Alzheimer’s. This deep brain stimulation (known as DBS) will be given to the fornix, a place in the brain that plays a central role in memory. Based on results of a small study of 6 patients with Alzheimer’s*, the ADvance study is designed to determine if DBS of the fornix (DBS-f) is safe and has potential clinical benefit for patients with mild Alzheimer’s. Read more about the study

Johns Hopkins is one of four study sites for this clinical trial.  The contact here is Jane Pollutra, RN (jpollut1@jhmi.edu) at 410-550-4258.

Depression in Alzheimer’s Disease Study

People with Alzheimer’s disease can feel depressed. This condition is treatable with medication. Symptoms of depression can be loss of interest, feelings of hopelessness, persistent aches and pains, feeling sad, anxious or empty, loss of appetite, irritability, restlessness, insomnia or even excessive sleeping. We are conducting a research study to examine this and to see if a drug called venlafaxine may help. If you or someone you know is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and experiencing feelings of depression, they may be eligible to participate in this study. If you are interested in learning more about this study please call Jane Pollutra 410-550-4258. Paul Rosenberg, M.D. Principal Investigator (JHU IRB Application #: NA_00066043)

Geriatric Depression Study

Are you over 60 and feeling depressed? Symptoms of depression in older adults are common yet often go undetected. Symptoms could include feelings of sadness or hopelessness, loss of energy, inability to enjoy pleasurable activities, changes in appetite or sleeping patterns, or poor concentration/memory. If you are feeling depressed, not taking antidepressant medication and in good physical health you may be eligible to participate in a research study involving treatment. Qualified people will participate at no cost to them and will be compensated for their time and transportation. For more information about the research study, please call us at 410-550-4192 or email us at BrainImagingStudy@lists.johnshopkins.edu . Principal Investigator: Gwenn Smith, PhD (IRB Protocol No: NA_00021615) Download PDF flyer

Download Brain Donation BrochureMemory & Aging Study

The Johns Hopkins Memory Center is currently conducting a study of the differences between normal aging, mild memory problems, and the onset of memory disorders like Alzheimer’s Disease. If you choose to participate in the Memory and Aging Study, you and a study partner will be invited to our clinic for a 2-3 hour assessment including memory testing, physical exam, and blood samples. We will ask you and your study partner questions about your daily functioning. You will return to our clinic once a year for an annual physical exam and memory testing. People, 60 years old or older, with or without memory problems, can participate in this study. If you are interested in learning more about this study please call Carolyn Koch at 410-550-9021. Constantine Lyketsos, MD, MPH,, Principal Investigator (JHU IRB Application No: NA_00045104)

Mild Cognitive Impairment Study

Are you more forgetful lately? Do you have trouble with the names of people you’ve met recently? Do you get lost in new places? Do you have a greater tendency to misplace things? Do other people notice that you are forgetful? If you are age 55 or over, having memory problems, not taking antidepressant medication and in good health, you may be eligible to participate in a research study. Qualified people will participate at no cost to them and will be compensated for their time and transportation. For more information about the research study, please call us at 410-550-4192 or email us at BrainImagingStudy@lists.johnshopkins.edu. (Principal Investigator: Gwenn Smith, PhD, IRB Protocol No: NA_00026190) Download flyer.

Preliminary Study of Carvedilol for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

This study is being done to see if the anti-hypertensive drug carvedilol can improve thinking and memory in people with Alzheimer’s disease. Carvedilol is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of hypertension (high blood pressure) and ventricular dysfunction. substances, which control the muscles in the heart. In an observational study of people with Alzheimer’s disease, there was some indication that people who took beta-blockers had a slower rate of decline in their thinking and memory. In studies using mice, daily doses of carvedilol decreased some of the toxic chemicals in the brain that are believed to cause Alzheimer’s disease. These initial observations suggest that carvedilol, by having a beneficial effect on vascular conditions in the brain, may decrease certain toxins in the brain. If you are interested in learning more about this study please call Jane Pollutra 410-550-4258. Paul Rosenberg, M.D. , Principal Investigator (JHU IRB Application #.: NA_00035546)

Oral Glucose Tolerance Test for Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarker Development

The purpose of this research is to find if there is a relationship between a chemical in the blood, which may be related to memory problems, and the body’s hormonal response from the pancreas, gut, and fat tissue after an oral glucose tolerance test. People with and without memory problems may join this study. The study involves a memory screening test and an oral glucose tolerance test. The results of these tests will help us with our research study related to memory, aging, and hormones. If you are interested in learning more about this study please call Jane Pollutra 410-550-4258. Esther Oh, M.D., Principal Investigator (JHU IRB Application No.: NA_00014837)

 

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