Skip Navigation
 
 
 
 
 
Print This Page
Share this page: More
 

Johns Hopkins Health - Guys: The Truth About Anger Management

Summer 2012
Issue No. 17

Guys: The Truth About Anger Management

Date: July 18, 2012

anger

Men who are prone to anger may be asking for a heart attack. That’s the conclusion of a study conducted by Johns Hopkins.

“Anger is probably the emotion that’s been looked at the most,” says Ilan Wittstein, M.D., a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins. “People, especially men, with angry or hostile personalities are much more at risk for developing heart disease early in life.”

Negative emotions cause adverse physiological reactions, including high blood pressure and narrowing of the arteries around the heart, which can restrict blood flow and result in a heart attack.

Managing stress and anger is one solution, but Wittstein also recommends reducing controllable risk factors such as high cholesterol.

Participate in a Clinical Trial
If you’ve had a heart attack in the past four years, Johns Hopkins is seeking male and female participants for a clinical trial to evaluate whether a medicine may prevent a heart attack from developing. Call 410-550-4278 for more details.

Related Content
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer