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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: July 26, 2017


Richard Chaisson, M.D., primary investigator of these studies and director of the Center for Tuberculosis Research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will be available at IAS 2017 to comment on this research.

Released: July 25, 2017


Alan Scott, Ph.D., associate professor in the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and codirector of the Genetic Resources Core Facility at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is available to comment on the recent DNA sequencing of the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, Neomonachus schauinslandi.
Released: July 24, 2017

Johns Hopkins researchers analyze Medicaid expansion’s effect on emergency department visits across Maryland


As the debate surrounding the Affordable Care Act (ACA) looms in the U.S. Congress, Johns Hopkins researchers are weighing in on one aspect of the law. In 2014, as part of the ACA, Maryland was one of the states that expanded eligibility for its Medicaid program. One of the proposed benefits of expanding Medicaid under the ACA was a reduction in emergency department patient visits. However, some research prior to the ACA implementation found new Medicaid enrollees increased their visits to the emergency department.

Released: July 20, 2017

Johns Hopkins researchers say findings may be a wake-up call for primary care providers


Johns Hopkins researchers who distributed a survey at a retreat and medical update for primary care physicians (PCPs) report that the vast majority of the 140 doctors who responded could not identify all 11 risk factors that experts say qualify patients for prediabetes screening. The survey, they say, is believed to be one of the first to formally test PCPs’ knowledge of current professional guidelines for such screening.
Released: July 17, 2017

A mathematical method to measure the effectiveness of treating Afib


In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the standard of care treatment for atrial fibrillation, the most common irregular heartbeat disorder.  This has the potential to let physicians and patients know immediately following treatment whether it was effective, or whether they’ll need to anticipate another procedure in the future. 
Released: July 17, 2017

Discovery suggests that strategies to regulate immune system cell reactivity to injury and cell loss might one day unlock and boost human tissue and cellular regeneration


Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report evidence that zebrafishes’ natural ability to regenerate their eyes’ retinal tissue can be accelerated by controlling the fishes’ immune systems. Because evolution likely conserved this mechanism of regenerative potential in other animals, the new findings may one day advance efforts to combat degenerative eye disease damage in humans.

Released: July 12, 2017

The 16-week M-1 Ventures program to provide dedicated startup support that facilitates the development of innovative health care solutions


Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures, Plank Industries, the University of Maryland (through UM Ventures), Brown Advisory and the Abell Foundation announced today that they are providing support for M-1 Ventures, a new Baltimore-based startup accelerator focused on connected health and fitness technologies. The 16-week program will be housed in FastForward East, an innovation hub on the Johns Hopkins medical campus, and will challenge startups selected from a national applicant pool to validate their business models, engage with customers and build on traction they have already generated. Additional support for the program comes from the Maryland Department of Commerce and Village Capital.

Released: July 11, 2017


Johns Hopkins physicians report success in a small study of a modified skin biopsy that hastens the earlier diagnosis of an inherited and progressively fatal nerve disease and seems to offer a clearer view of the disorder’s severity and progression. With a quicker and less invasive way to visualize the hallmark protein clumps of the rare but lethal disease — familial transthyretin amyloidosis — the researchers say they hope to more rapidly advance clinical trials of treatments that may slow the disease and extend patients’ lives.

Released: July 11, 2017

Test tube and mouse studies show TAK228 enhances the tumor-killing effects of radiation and chemotherapy


Laboratory studies suggest that an experimental drug already in early clinical trials for a variety of adult cancers might enhance radiation and chemotherapy for two childhood brain cancers that currently are virtually always fatal.

Released: July 10, 2017

Study also shows that so-called purer form of MDMA called Molly rarely is


Johns Hopkins scientists report that data collected over five years by volunteers who tested pills free of charge at music festivals and raves across the United States suggest that at least some recreational users of illegal drugs may choose not to take them if tests show the pills are adulterated or fake.

Released: July 7, 2017

Scripts generated electronically avoided trio of major errors in opioid drug prescribing


In a small study of opioid prescriptions filled at a Johns Hopkins Medicine outpatient pharmacy, researchers found that handwritten orders for the drugs contribute heavily to a trio of prescribing and processing errors in contrast to those created electronically.

Released: July 5, 2017


Scientists at Johns Hopkins, Rutgers, the University of Trento in Italy, and Harvard Medical School report they have developed a new molecular technique called LASSO cloning, which can be used to isolate thousands of long DNA sequences at the same time, more than ever before possible.

Released: June 29, 2017

Johns Hopkins expert offers reminder of potential dangers this holiday.


The Fourth of July is almost here, and many people are getting ready to revel in the red, white and blue. The holiday is often filled with barbecues, firework displays and patriotic pride, but, for some families, the celebration ends at the hospital. “Fourth of July is a time to celebrate, and it’s important to take time to do so, but it is important to keep safety in mind so you can avoid a trip to the Emergency Department,” says Susan Peterson, M.D., associate medical director for patient safety and quality in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

Released: June 29, 2017

Laparoscopic approach for pancreatitis resulted in fewer complications, shorter hospital stays, less need for opioids


Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that their first series of a minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic pancreas disease, known as severe pancreatitis, resulted in shorter hospital stays, less need for opioids and fewer complications, compared with standard surgical approaches.

Released: June 29, 2017

Experiments in single-celled organisms have implications for blocking cancer metastasis and other disease-related cell movements


Johns Hopkins researchers report they have uncovered a mechanism in amoebae that rapidly changes the way cells migrate by resetting their sensitivity to the naturally occurring internal signaling events that drive such movement

Released: June 28, 2017

Proteins impeding immune responses against cancer — not alterations in the genes that make them — could be the “Achilles heel” of some cancers


By comparing variations in protein expression in tumor samples from a single melanoma patient, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center say their findings have the potential to reveal some of the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to immunotherapy drugs. The “proof of concept” findings, published online Feb. 13, 2017, in Clinical Cancer Research, point to distinct variations not in the genetic code of each tumor sample, but in the expression levels of certain proteins encoded by normal genes.

Released: June 27, 2017


Johns Hopkins Children’s Center was ranked #5 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report on its 2017–18 Best Children's Hospitals Honor Roll. Johns Hopkins Children’s Center has the distinction of being the only children’s hospital integrated with an adult facility to make the honor roll this year, and continues to be the highest-ranked pediatric hospital in the state of Maryland.

Released: June 26, 2017


The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and WellSpan Health today announced a new clinical collaboration that will benefit patients living with cancer in central Pennsylvania’s Adams, Lancaster, Lebanon and York counties.

Released: June 23, 2017


The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Brancati Center will provide free community health screenings this Saturday, June 24, at Zion Baptist Church/Oliver Community Outreach Fair.