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Transient Global Amnesia

Transient global amnesia (TGA) refers to the abrupt onset of an inability to form new memories that lasts less than a day. Patients with TGA typically have no difficulties recognizing family members, and can recall things from the past. By definition, these problems clear over time.

There are several causes of TGA; the most common are migraine or a temporary interruption of the blood supply to the brain. Accurate diagnosis usually involves imaging of the brain to determine the status of the brain’s blood vessels.

 

Carefinder
Hopkins clinicians recommend the Alzheimer's Association web resource known as Carefinder, It outlines how to plan ahead for patients with memory problems, and identifies care options, support services, and guidelines for how to coordinate care for persons with memory disorders. This interactive web-based tool permits you to identify resources that fit your needs.

Get more information

 

 

Out-of-State and International Patients - Find Out More

 
 
 
 
 

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