Skip Navigation
 
 
 
 xxx
 
Print This Page
Share this page: More
 

Chordoma Center

Chordomas are tumors that form from remnants of the notochord, embryonic tissue that eventually becomes the center of spinal disks. They can occur anywhere within the spine, but almost a third of them show up in the lower back (sacral area.)  

Chordomas: What You Need to Know

Woman using laptop

Chordomas can appear relatively harmless in pathology reports. But even after staying inactive for a time, they can grow aggressively and spread. If a chordoma becomes very large, you may even be able to feel a lump in your spine.

Growing chordomas can press on the spine and nerves, causing pain and nerve problems, such as:

  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Weakness
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control

When chordomas metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body, they can become life threatening. It’s essential to have them treated promptly while they are still manageable.

 

Request an Appointment




Why choose the Johns Hopkins Spinal Tumor Center?

surgeons

Our Physicians

The experts at Johns Hopkins’ Chordoma Center have vast experience with these rare tumors affecting the sacral spine, which has allowed us to develop a comprehensive approach to their treatment. 

Meet Our Physicians:

Our Patient Care

As one of the busiest chordoma centers in the nation, our group ensures you get a team with years of cumulative experience and the very latest techniques.

Learn more about chordoma treatment at Johns Hopkins.


Our Research

Explore current clinical trials in chordoma treatment.

 

Scheduled for Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins?

Watch the patient experience video before you come

Related Links

COLLABORATIONS IN DISCOVERY
A Rare Chance to Cure A Difficult Cancer
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Neurosurgical Spine Center are developing new surgical techniques to remove chordomas.

More News and Media

Out-of-State and International Patients - Find Out More

 
 
 
 
 

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer