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Glutamatergic Imaging (7T MRI) Study

Study objective:

This research is being done to try and learn more about the neurobiological development of the brains of children with primary complex motor stereotypies. Imaging studies of the brain (MRI) will allow us to investigate the role of glutamate, a neurotransmitter or messenger chemical, in the primary complex motor stereotypies.

Participant eligibility:

Participants must be 5-9 years old. We are currently recruiting children with primary complex motor stereotypies. These movements include flapping or rotating the hands, fluttering fingers in front of the face, flapping/waving arm movements, opening and closing of the hands, and finger wiggling.

Requirements:

Total time commitment: introductory phone screening plus one to one and a half days on site at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland.

  1. Introductory phone screening – Parent or guardian completes a telephone questionnaire administered by our Study Coordinator to confirm whether the child meets the eligibility criteria.
     
  2. Neuropsychological assessment – A half-day assessment with a neuropsychologist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland will include a variety of comprehensive neuropsychological and cognitive tests. If testing cannot be completed in one morning, participants may continue testing the next morning.
  3. MRI scan – Following the neuropsychological assessment, the child participates in a dry-run (mock) MRI. This helps the child understand what to expect and alleviates any pre-scan jitters. After the mock MRI, the actual scan takes about 60 to 80 minutes.

More information and enrollment:

Call 410-955-1960 for Tina Kline, Study Coordinator. 

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