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What is a Glioma?

Glioma is a common type of primary brain tumor, accounting for about 33% of these tumors. Gliomas originate in the glial cells in the brain. Glial cells are the tissue that surrounds and supports neurons in the brain.

These tumors arise from three different types of cells that are normally found in the brain: astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymal cells. Gliomas are called intrinsic brain tumors because they reside within the substance of the brain and often intermix with normal brain tissue.

There are different grades of gliomas; however, they are most often referred to as "low-grade" or "high-grade" gliomas. The low or high grade designation reflects the growth potential and aggressiveness of the tumor.

Causes of and risk factors for glioma:

There is no obvious cause of glioma. This type of brain tumor affects all ages, but is more common in adults. Gliomas are slightly more common in men than in women and more common in Caucasian people than in African-American people.


Learn about types of gliomas: astrocytoma, brain stem glioma, ependymoma, mixed glioma, oligodendroglioma, optic nerve glioma.


To make an appointment or request a consultation, contact the Johns Hopkins Glioma Center at 410-955-6406.

 
 

Our Comprehensive Brain Tumor Center is a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Brain Tumor Center is a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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