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Geoffrey Shiu Fei Ling, M.D.

Photo of Dr. Geoffrey Shiu Fei Ling, M.D.

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Background

Geoffrey S. F. Ling, M.D., Ph.D., is a medical doctor who retired from the United States Army as a colonel. He served as the director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Biological Technologies Office and is an expert in traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Prominent in his research portfolio are neuroscience, specifically, preventing violent explosive neurologic trauma (PREVENT); prevention of traumatic brain injury; and development of responsive, brain-controlled, artificial arms. He also serves as the deputy director of the Defense Sciences Office. Ling is a recipient of the Humanitarian Award from the Brain Mapping Foundation.

Ling earned his bachelor's degree with honors from Washington University, and earned his doctorate in pharmacology from Cornell University School of Medicine. He completed postdoctoral training in neuropharmacology at the Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center. Ling earned an M.D. from Georgetown University School of Medicine. Both his neurology internship and later residency were completed at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Ling also completed a fellowship at Johns Hopkins University, in the neurosciences critical care unit (NCCU).

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Departments / Divisions

Education

Degrees

  • MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine (1989)

Residencies

  • Walter Reed National Military Medical Center / Neurology (1993)

Fellowships

  • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (1984)
  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine / Neurology (1995)

Patient Ratings & Comments

The Patient Rating score is an average of all responses to physician related questions on the national CG-CAHPS Medical Practice patient experience survey through Press Ganey. Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best score. Comments are also gathered from our CG-CAHPS Medical Practice Survey through Press Ganey and displayed in their entirety. Patients are de-identified for confidentiality and patient privacy.

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