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Brendan Antiochos, M.D.

Photo of Dr. Brendan Antiochos, M.D.

Instructor of Medicine

Male

Expertise: Rheumatology, Sjogren's Syndrome

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I live in Maryland

443-997-1552
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I live outside of Maryland

410-464-6641
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+1-410-502-7683
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Locations

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
Appointment Phone: 443-997-1552

Sjogrens Center
301 Mason Lord Drive
Baltimore, MD 21224 map

Background

Dr. Antiochos sees patients in the Jerome Greene Sjögren’s Center on the Bayview campus, and conducts basic science research into the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases under the combined mentorship of Dr. Livia Casciola-Rosen and Dr. Antony Rosen. His research currently focuses on elements of the innate immune system that detect foreign nucleic acid within cells, and subsequently incite an inflammatory response; these pathways likely play a role in the development of Sjögren’s syndrome and related rheumatic diseases.

  • M.D.: Dartmouth Medical School
  • Residency in Internal Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University
  • Rheumatology Fellowship, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 
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Titles

  • Instructor of Medicine

Education

Degrees

  • MD, Dartmouth Medical School (2008)

Residencies

  • Oregon Health & Sciences University Hospital / Internal Medicine (2011)

Fellowships

  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine / Rheumatology

Board Certifications

  • American Board of Internal Medicine / Internal Medicine (2011)

Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Antiochos conducts laboratory based translational research into the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases under the combined mentorship of Dr. Livia Casciola-Rosen and Dr. Antony Rosen. His research currently focuses on elements of the innate immune system that detect foreign nucleic acid within cells, and subsequently incite an inflammatory response; these pathways likely play a role in the development of Sjögren’s syndrome and related rheumatic diseases.

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