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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: April 29, 2017


John Walley Littlefield, M.D., a renowned physician-scientist whose work dramatically advanced the field of genetics and touched countless human lives, died peacefully on Thursday, April 20, surrounded by his family and loved ones. He was 91.

Released: April 28, 2017


In an analysis of Medicare billing data submitted by more than 2,300 United States physicians, researchers have calculated the average number of surgical slices, or cuts, made during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), a procedure that progressively removes thin layers of cancerous skin tissue in a way that minimizes damage to healthy skin and the risks of leaving cancerous tissue behind.

Released: April 28, 2017

Half of Survivors Jobless After a Year and Lost Nearly Two-Thirds of Annual Income


According to a new multicenter study, nearly half of previously employed adult survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome were jobless one year after hospital discharge, and are estimated to have lost an average of $27,000 in earnings.

Released: April 28, 2017

Finding in mice could lead to new therapies for damaged organs and cancer


A gene previously identified as critical for tumor growth in many human cancers also maintains intestinal stem cells and encourages the growth of cells that support them, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. The finding, reported in the Apr. 28 issue of Nature Communications, adds to evidence for the intimate link between stem cells and cancer, and advances prospects for regenerative medicine and cancer treatments.

Released: April 27, 2017


Xiaoqin Wang, Ph.D., a professor of biomedical engineering, neuroscience and otolaryngology–head and neck surgery, and director of the Laboratory of Auditory Neurophysiology at The Johns Hopkins University, has won a $12 million award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) for work with a multi-university team that will focus on targeted neuroplasticity training.

Released: April 27, 2017


A dedication ceremony and ribbon cutting with Johns Hopkins leadership and an open house of the new John G. Bartlett Specialty Practice at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Released: April 27, 2017


Johns Hopkins researchers report that an analysis of survey responses and health records of more than 10,000 American adults for nearly 20 years suggests a “synergistic” link between exercise and good vitamin D levels in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

Released: April 27, 2017


Allegheny Health Network in Pennsylvania is the latest health system to join the Johns Hopkins Clinical Research Network. Developed by the Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, the research network is designed to establish a network of academic and community-based clinical researchers who provide new opportunities for research collaborations and accelerate the transfer of new diagnostic, treatment and disease prevention advances from the research arena to patient care.

Released: April 26, 2017

By providing startups education, mentorship, services and affordable space, FastForward 1812 aims to help revitalize Baltimore’s economy


The Johns Hopkins University announced today the opening of its state-of-the-art innovation hub, FastForward 1812. The 23,000-square-foot space near Johns Hopkins’ flagship hospital and schools of medicine, public health and nursing provides Baltimore’s burgeoning innovation ecosystem and area startups sought-after office, co-working and wet lab space to accommodate a variety of startups.

Released: April 26, 2017

Researchers find that removing senescent cells prevents joint degradation and promotes renewal in mouse joints


In a preclinical study in mice and human cells, researchers report that selectively removing old or ‘senescent’ cells from joints could stop and even reverse the progression of osteoarthritis.

Released: April 25, 2017


Working with human brain tissue samples and genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers together with colleagues at the National Institutes of Health, the University of California San Diego Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Columbia University, and the Institute for Basic Research in Staten Island say that consequences of low levels of the protein NPTX2 in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) may change the pattern of neural activity in ways that lead to the learning and memory loss that are hallmarks of the disease.

Released: April 25, 2017

Special Effects Pros Help Create Lifelike 3D Simulator for Practicing Brain Surgery


A team of computer engineers and neurosurgeons, with an assist from Hollywood special effects experts, reports successful early tests of a novel, lifelike 3D simulator designed to teach surgeons to perform a delicate, minimally invasive brain operation.

Released: April 24, 2017


Six Johns Hopkins physicians were elected to the Association of American Physicians at the annual meeting of the organization April 21-23 in Chicago.
 

Released: April 24, 2017

Closing disclosure gap for lesbian, gay and bisexual community should improve care


A study that surveyed a national sample of emergency department health care providers and adult patients suggests that patients are substantially more willing to disclose their sexual orientation than health care workers believe.

Released: April 20, 2017

Study in mice identifies neurons that sense touch and motion, a combo needed to actively perceive the external world


Working with genetically engineered mice — and especially their whiskers — Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a group of nerve cells in the skin responsible for what they call “active touch,” a combination of  motion and sensory feeling needed to navigate the external world. The discovery of this basic sensory mechanism, described online April 20 in the journal Neuron, advances the search for better “smart” prosthetics for people, ones that provide more natural sensory feedback to the brain during use.

Released: April 20, 2017


The Johns Hopkins Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) marked its 20-year history supporting large-scale scientific collaboration by securing funding to the center through 2023.  CIDR successfully competed for a seven-year contract from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing up to $213 million in research funding. The renewal contract enables NIH-funded researchers to use CIDR’s sequencing, high-throughput genotyping, analysis and informatics services for a wide array of studies exploring genetic contributions to human health and disease.

Released: April 19, 2017

Mutant forms of HIV complicate disease monitoring and distract the immune system from the functional virus


Researchers at Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities report new evidence that proteins created by defective forms of HIV long previously believed to be harmless actually interact with our immune systems and are actively monitored by a specific type of immune cell, called cytotoxic T cells.

Released: April 19, 2017

Use of sestamibi SPECT/CT scan could spare patients with benign kidney tumors from unneeded surgery


The latest in a series of studies led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine shows that addition of a widely available, noninvasive imaging test called 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT/CT to CT or MRI increases the accuracy of kidney tumor classification. The research team reports that the potential improvement in diagnostic accuracy will spare thousands of patients each year in the United States alone from having to undergo unnecessary surgery.

Released: April 18, 2017

New evidence that, contrary to dogma, a healthy adult gut loses and regenerates a third of its nerve cells weekly


Johns Hopkins researchers today published new evidence refuting the long-held scientific belief that the gut nerve cells we’re born with are the same ones we die with.

Released: April 18, 2017


Although human population studies have linked air pollution to chronic inflammation of nasal and sinus tissues, direct biological and molecular evidence for cause and effect has been scant. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers report that experiments in mice continually exposed to dirty air have revealed that direct biological effect.