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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: December 17, 2014


As foreign and domestic health care workers in West Africa fight to contain the deadliest Ebola virus disease outbreak in history, a group of disaster response and modeling experts from Johns Hopkins say a potential pool of manpower to help care for patients with Ebola is being overlooked and should be tapped quickly: people who have survived and recovered from Ebola virus infection.

Released: December 17, 2014

Points to new strategy to reduce allergic responses to many medications


Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, they say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV.

Released: December 16, 2014

Clinical trial shows no beneficial effects on key measures of heart disease and diabetes risk


Good news for people who are already following a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and low in sweets: New research suggests these heart-healthy eaters don’t need to worry about choosing low glycemic index foods to lower the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

Released: December 16, 2014

Study could lead to mitochondrial DNA blood tests to foretell risk


New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) found in peoples’ blood directly relates to how frail they are medically. This DNA may prove to be a useful predictor of overall risk of frailty and death from any cause 10 to 15 years before symptoms appear.

Released: December 15, 2014

Johns Hopkins/Jhpiego design aims to reduce infection risks for health care workers


An advanced protective suit for health care workers who treat Ebola patients, devised by a Johns Hopkins team, is one of the first five awardees in a federal funding contest aimed at quickly devising new tools to combat the deadly disease.

Released: December 15, 2014

New study by Johns Hopkins researchers could boost vaccine development efforts


Using a specially selected library of different hepatitis C viruses, a team of researchers led by Johns Hopkins scientists has identified tiny differences in the pathogens’ outer shell proteins that underpin their resistance to antibodies.

Released: December 11, 2014


The Food and Drug Administration wants to know when and why costlier brand-name drugs are used instead of generic ones. The organization has tapped a team at Johns Hopkins for a two-year study that will analyze factors that determine underuse of generic drugs

Released: December 10, 2014

Johns Hopkins study is largest so far of gene expression in autism brains


While many different combinations of genetic traits can cause autism, brains affected by autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses, an analysis of data from autopsied human brains reveals. The study, a collaborative effort between Johns Hopkins and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, included data from 72 autism and control brains.

Released: December 10, 2014


Many children who sustain so-called open bone fractures in the forearm or lower leg can, and do, heal safely without surgery, according to the results of a small study led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

Released: December 9, 2014

Protein inhibitor makes cell susceptible to chemotherapy


Triple-negative breast cancer is as bad as it sounds. The cells that form these tumors lack three proteins that would make the cancer respond to powerful, customized treatments. Instead, doctors are left with treating these patients with traditional chemotherapy drugs that only show long-term effectiveness in 20 percent of women with triple-negative breast cancer. Now, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have discovered a way that breast cancer cells are able to resist the effects of chemotherapy — and they have found a way to reverse that process.

Released: December 9, 2014


Journalists are invited to hear from more than 20 Johns Hopkins-affiliated startups on Dec. 10 at an event entitled “A Healthcare Technology Day.” The showcase, which will run from 2 to 6 p.m. at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, will feature presentations by company management and offer opportunities for one-on-one interviews.

Released: December 9, 2014

A step toward cracking the code of how brains work


Whether we’re paying attention to something we see can be discerned by monitoring the firings of specific groups of brain cells. Now, new work from Johns Hopkins shows that the same holds true for the sense of touch. The study brings researchers closer to understanding how animals’ thoughts and feelings affect their perception of external stimuli.

Released: December 3, 2014


Akira Sawa, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavorial Sciences and director of the Johns Hopkins Schizophrenia Center, has been named the inaugural Sachiko Kuno and Ryuji Ueno Innovation Professor, endowed by scientists, biotech entrepreneurs and philanthropists Ryuji Ueno and Sachiko Kuno.

Released: December 3, 2014


Johns Hopkins University has been awarded a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging to fund a center that will conduct research on the informal support resources of vulnerable older adults.

Released: December 1, 2014


Johns Hopkins researchers report that their test of an interventional X-ray guidance device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2013 has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure of patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for liver cancer.

Released: November 26, 2014


One little stick can save your life. The flu shot remains critically important to fight off the influenza virus, both around the world and in your home, say doctors and researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who encourage people 6 months of age and older to get vaccinated against this year’s influenza virus.

Released: November 25, 2014


Six Johns Hopkins University researchers have been elected by their peers as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Aravinda Chakravarti, Peter J. Espenshade, Alex Leo Kolodkin, Jin Zhang, Margaret Meixner and Daniela Drummond-Barbosa are among 401 new members honored this year for advancing science or its applications.

Released: November 25, 2014

Experts urge caution in implementing pay-for-performance schemes tied to coordinating ‘transitional care’ of older adults


In what is believed to be the first interview-style qualitative study of its kind among health care providers in the trenches, a team led by a Johns Hopkins geriatrician has further documented barriers to better care of older adults as they are transferred from hospital to rehabilitation center to home, and too often back again.

Released: November 24, 2014


After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy.
 
Released: November 21, 2014

Implications for autoimmune disease, vaccine design


Immunity is a thankless job. Though the army of cells known as the immune system continuously keeps us safe from a barrage of viruses, bacteria and even precancerous cells, we mainly notice it when something goes wrong: “Why did I get the flu this year even though I got vaccinated?” “Why does innocent pollen turn me into a red-eyed, sniffling mess?”

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