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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: May 22, 2017


In a recent paper published online in the journal Critical Care Medicine, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality led a study that demonstrated that health care providers can take steps to curb ventilator-associated events.

Released: May 18, 2017


You might remember him as Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H,” as Senator Vinick on “The West Wing,” or as the host of PBS’ “Scientific American Frontiers” for more than a decade. This Friday, Alan Alda will be visiting Johns Hopkins to share his thoughts on the importance of clear science communications to faculty, staff and students. Since 2009, he has been running the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stonybrook University, and has been a proponent of science communication and making science more accessible to everyone.

Released: May 18, 2017

The process may cause more harm than good


Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new way that cells in the brain alert the rest of the body to recruit immune cells when the brain is injured. The work was completed in mouse models that mimic infection, stroke or trauma in humans.

Released: May 16, 2017


In a small and preliminary clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and their collaborators have shown that an experimental gene therapy that uses viruses to introduce a therapeutic gene into the eye is safe and that it may be effective in preserving the vision of people with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in the U.S., affecting an estimated 1.6 million Americans. The disease is marked by growth of abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid into the central portion of the retina called the macula, which we use for reading, driving and recognizing faces.

Released: May 10, 2017


Using gene sequencing tools, scientists from Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of British Columbia have found a set of genetic mutations in samples from 24 women with benign endometriosis, a painful disorder marked by the growth of uterine tissue outside of the womb. The findings, described in the May 11 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, may eventually help scientists develop molecular tests to distinguish between aggressive and clinically “indolent,” or non-aggressive, types of endometriosis.

Released: May 10, 2017


What:    The annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
When: May 7-11

Where: Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD
(1 W. Pratt St. Baltimore, MD 21201)

Released: May 8, 2017


Every year since 2008, the Johns Hopkins Women’s Health Research Group has hosted the Women’s Health Research Symposium to showcase research collaborations across Johns Hopkins’ schools of medicine, public health and nursing. 

Released: May 8, 2017


In experiments with human colon cancer cells and mice, a team led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have evidence that cancer arises when a normal part of cells’ machinery generally used to repair DNA damage is diverted from its usual task. The findings, if further studies confirm them, could lead to the identification of novel molecular targets for anticancer drugs or tests for cancer recurrence, the investigators say.

Released: May 8, 2017


James Potash, M.D., M.P.H., will rejoin Johns Hopkins Medicine on July 1 as the Henry Phipps Professor and director of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Released: May 8, 2017

Researchers urge hospitals to better assess such findings when people arrive with chest pain


In an analysis of medical records gathered from more than 300 hospitalized patients, a team of researchers reports that routine imaging scans used to help diagnose heart attacks generated “incidental findings” (IFs) in more than half of these patients. The investigators say only about 7 percent of these IFs were medically significant and urged imaging experts and hospitals to explore ways to safely reduce the added costly — and potentially risky — days in the hospital the IFs generate.

Released: May 8, 2017


WHAT: The Latino Health Conference 2017, sponsored by Johns Hopkins Centro SOL and the Urban Health Institute, will discuss the value of Latino health research during changing times. The conference brings together renowned researchers to address topics of interest for this year's theme, which has an impact on health care quality and outcomes. There will be a speed mentoring session for young investigators or students interested in pursuing careers in research. Community organizations are invited to attend the conference and reserve their seat for the community-driven research luncheon.

Released: May 4, 2017


Working with mouse, fly and human cells and tissue, Johns Hopkins researchers report new evidence that disruptions in the movement of cellular materials in and out of a cell’s control center — the nucleus — appear to be a direct cause of brain cell death in Huntington’s disease, an inherited adult neurodegenerative disorder.

Released: May 4, 2017


As part of an intensive weeklong boot camp to prepare fourth-year medical students who have matched into a surgical residency, the Johns Hopkins Department of Surgery will hold a “Surgical Olympics.”  

Students will rotate through three stations (rated for time and accuracy), hang out in the “Olympic Village” between stations, and wrap up with a Jeopardy-style match.

Released: May 3, 2017


The Johns Hopkins Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) has received a five-year, $15.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue its work supporting HIV research across the university.

Released: May 3, 2017


Johns Hopkins’ Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is celebrating its 50th anniversary on May 4, 2017.

OMIM is a comprehensive database of human genes and genetic disorders authored and updated daily by the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine. In the early 1960s, Dr. Victor A. McKusick pioneered this catalog entitled Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM) allowing physicians and medical professionals around the world to diagnose genetic conditions before genetic testing became readily available. OMIM, the online version, was launched in 1985 and became readily available on the internet in 1987. Fifty years later, OMIM is still a fundamental source of information in the scientific community.

Released: May 3, 2017


Flying a stroke specialist by helicopter to a nearby stroke patient for emergency care is feasible, saves money and, most importantly, gets critical care to patients faster than transporting the patient to a hospital first, according to a single-patient, proof-of-concept study by a Johns Hopkins Medicine research team.

Released: May 3, 2017


Using fruit flies, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a specific and very small set of brain cells — dubbed dopamine wedge neurons — responsible for driving the insects’ food preferences toward what they need, rather than what they like.

Released: May 2, 2017


Johns Hopkins University faculty members Stephen B. Baylin, M.D., and Robert F. Siliciano, M.D., Ph.D., have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”

Released: May 2, 2017

Brand new, multimillion dollar outpatient facility offers convenience and brings together essential services for patient care


The Division of Infectious Diseases in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine announces the opening of the John G. Bartlett Specialty Practice at The Johns Hopkins Hospital on Monday, May 8, 2017.

Released: April 29, 2017


John Walley Littlefield, M.D., a renowned physician-scientist whose work dramatically advanced the field of genetics and touched countless human lives, died peacefully on Thursday, April 20, surrounded by his family and loved ones. He was 91.