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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: June 29, 2015

Resident contributions to care have no effect on rates of complications or death, data analysis shows


An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations. The contributions of residents, who work under the supervision and alongside senior physicians, do nothing to increase patients’ risks of postoperative complications or of dying within 30 days of the surgery, the analysis showed.

Released: June 24, 2015

Patients who get referred to kidney specialists do best


The notion that geography often shapes economic and political destiny has long informed the work of economists and political scholars. Now a study led by medical scientists at Johns Hopkins reveals how geography also appears to affect the very survival of people with end-stage kidney disease in need of dialysis.

Released: June 24, 2015


Working with heart muscle cells from diabetic rats, scientists at Johns Hopkins have located what they say is the epicenter of mischief wreaked by too much blood sugar and used a sugar-gobbling enzyme to restore normal function in the glucose-damaged cells of animal heart muscles.

Released: June 24, 2015


On the hunt for better cancer screening tests, Johns Hopkins scientists led a proof of principle study that successfully identified tumor DNA shed into the blood and saliva of 93 patients with head and neck cancer. A report on the findings is published in the June 24 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Released: June 23, 2015

Review of small sample of dispensary products suggests buyers at risk of overdosing or being cheated


In a proof-of-concept study, a team led by a Johns Hopkins researcher reports that the vast majority of edible cannabis products sold in a small sample of medical marijuana dispensaries carried labels that overstated or understated the amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

Released: June 23, 2015


A review of medical records for almost 200 patients with breast cancer suggests that more selective use of biomarker testing for such patients has the potential to save millions of dollars in health care spending without compromising care.

Released: June 23, 2015

Experimental therapy restores normal fat metabolism in animals with atherosclerosis


In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals’ ability to properly handle cholesterol.

Released: June 22, 2015

Heart muscle “exquisitely sensitive” to even mild elevations in blood pressure, study suggests


Mild elevations in blood pressure considered to be in the upper range of normal during young adulthood can lead to subclinical heart damage by middle age — a condition that sets the stage for full-blown heart failure, according to findings of a federally funded study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins.

Released: June 22, 2015


In a genome-wide association study believed to be the largest of its kind, Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered four regions in the human genome where changes may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer.

Released: June 19, 2015

Gemstone Biotherapeutics Wins Maryland Incubator Company of the Year Award


Gemstone Biotherapeutics, a participant in the Johns Hopkins startup accelerator program FastForward East, has been named Best Life Sciences Company at the Maryland Incubator Company of the Year awards. The award recognizes achievements by current biotechnology or life sciences clients and graduates of Maryland incubators.

Released: June 18, 2015


A cosmetic surgery that uses injections of hyaluronic acid to make lips appear fuller could also improve the lives of people with facial paralysis, according to results of a small study by researchers at Johns Hopkins and Stanford universities.

Released: June 18, 2015

Finding suggests novel mechanism for treating epilepsy


An amino acid whose role in the body has been all but a mystery appears to act as a potent seizure inhibitor in mice, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins.

Released: June 17, 2015

Findings in animals could spark therapies to halt the decline of aging hearts


Research conducted in fruit flies, rats and monkeys by scientists at Johns Hopkins, UC San Diego, and other institutions reveals that levels of a protein called vinculin increase with age to alter the shape and performance of cardiac muscle cells — a healthy adaptive change that helps sustain heart muscle vitality over many decades.

Released: June 17, 2015


Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumor, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible. Now Johns Hopkins researchers report they have developed an imaging technology that could provide surgeons with a color-coded map of a patient’s brain showing which areas are and are not cancer.

Released: June 16, 2015


Baltimore (June 16, 2015) –The Johns Hopkins University and Bayer HealthCare have entered into a five-year collaboration agreement to jointly develop new ophthalmic therapies targeting retinal diseases. The goal of the strategic research alliance is to accelerate the translation of innovative approaches from the laboratory to the clinic, ultimately offering patients new treatment options for several retinal diseases.

Released: June 15, 2015


Up to one-fifth of human DNA act as dimmer switches for nearby genes, but scientists have long been unable to identify precisely which mutations in these genetic control regions really matter in causing common diseases. Now, a decade of work at Johns Hopkins has yielded a computer formula that predicts with far more accuracy than current methods which mutations are likely to have the largest effect on the activity of the dimmer switches, suggesting new targets for diagnosis and treatment of many diseases.

Released: June 15, 2015


This year, the Maryland Stem Cell Research Commission awarded 21 of its 29 grants to Johns Hopkins researchers. One researcher won two grants. The grants will support projects that study the basic principles of how stem cells work and that develop potential therapies for conditions ranging from traumatic brain injury to heart disease to ALS. This year’s grants will total $9.4 million.

Released: June 11, 2015

Better “continuity of care” could significantly reduce overuse of medical tests such as preoperative chest X-rays


A “look back” study of Medicare fee-for-service claims for more than 1.2 million patients over age 65 has directly affirmed and quantified a long-suspected link between lower rates of coordinated health care services and higher rates of unnecessary medical tests and procedures.

Released: June 10, 2015


Johns Hopkins infectious disease researcher Sara Cosgrove, M.D., M.S., has been tapped by the White House to help address solutions to the ever-growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Released: June 10, 2015

Small study in mice and cells shows combination of gene-targeting drugs slows leukemia cell growth


 
In preliminary experiments with mice and lab-grown cells, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have found that a protein-signaling process accelerates the work of the gene most frequently mutated in a common form of adult leukemia and is likely necessary to bring about the full-blown disease.

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