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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: April 23, 2014

Damage traced in part to dopamine transport system injury in brain cells


Johns Hopkins scientists report that rats exposed to high-energy particles, simulating conditions astronauts would face on a long-term deep space mission, show lapses in attention and slower reaction times, even when the radiation exposure is in extremely low dose ranges.

Released: April 23, 2014


Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain’s “cognitive reserve” may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

Released: April 22, 2014

Molecular inhibitor represents new treatment target for drugs to halt atherosclerosis


Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain.

Released: April 18, 2014


 
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
Released: April 18, 2014


Three Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have been awarded two-year grants for their work on potential treatments for diabetes, Novo Nordisk announced this month.
 

Released: April 17, 2014

Studies carry implications for understanding cancer


Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered an unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit flies: When a certain kind of stem cell is killed off experimentally, another group of non-stem cells can come out of retirement to replace them.

Released: April 16, 2014

Findings may advance efforts to better manage the infection


A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins and Stanford University researchers has laid the groundwork for understanding how variations in immune responses to Lyme disease can contribute to the many different outcomes of this bacterial infection seen in individual patients. A report on the work appears online April 16 in PLOS One.

Released: April 16, 2014

Johns Hopkins Children’s Center experts urge new parents to pay attention to baby’s poop color


Fecal color and consistency are well-known markers of digestive health in both children and adults, but paying attention to a newborn’s shade of poop can be a decided lifesaver in babies born with the rare, liver-ravaging disorder biliary atresia, commonly heralded by white or clay-colored stool.
 

Released: April 15, 2014


Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment.

Released: April 14, 2014


M. Daniel Lane, a Johns Hopkins biochemist renowned for his groundbreaking studies of the chemical processes within the human body that affect hunger, the feeling of fullness and obesity, as well as for his warmth and brilliance as a scientific mentor to generations of Hopkins researchers—including a future Nobel Prize winner—died at his Baltimore home on April 10 of myeloma. He was 83.

Released: April 10, 2014


Johns Hopkins-led research into genetic factors that cause kidney disease to progress faster in African-Americans than in whites has been selected as one of the top 10 clinical research achievements of 2013 by the Clinical Research Forum.

Released: April 10, 2014


In experiments with mice, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified an enzyme involved in the regulation of immune system T cells that could be a useful target in treating asthma and boosting the effects of certain cancer therapies.

Released: April 10, 2014


Analyzing a national database of hospital inpatient records, a team of researchers reports an expected spike in mortality six days after cardiac surgery, but also a more surprising and potentially troubling jump in deaths at the 30-day mark.

Released: April 10, 2014


Working with human neurons and fruit flies, researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified and then shut down a biological process that appears to trigger a particular form of Parkinson’s disease present in a large number of patients. A report on the study, in the April 10 issue of the journal Cell, could lead to new treatments for this disorder.

Released: April 9, 2014


The following announcements are related to awards that have been presented during the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014, held in San Diego April 5-9, to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Released: April 9, 2014

Ramy El-Diwany is co-founder of the Charm City Clinic in East Baltimore


Ramy El-Diwany, a fifth-year M.D./Ph.D. student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has won a 2014 Excellence in Public Health Award from the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Physician Professional Advisory Committee for his contributions to community health services.

Released: April 8, 2014


Research in mice and human cell lines has identified an experimental compound dubbed TTT-3002 as potentially one of the most potent drugs available to block genetic mutations in cancer cells blamed for some forms of treatment-resistant leukemia. 

Released: April 8, 2014

Research linked to stress in mice confirms blood-brain comparison is valid


Johns Hopkins researchers say they have confirmed suspicions that DNA modifications found in the blood of mice exposed to high levels of stress hormone — and showing signs of anxiety — are directly related to changes found in their brain tissues.

Released: April 7, 2014


What: Johns Hopkins public health and emergency preparedness experts will host the first national symposium designed to help health care providers and staff better prepare for and react to an “active shooter” in hospitals and other the health care settings. The “Active Shooter Incidents in Hospitals and Healthcare Settings” symposium will explore the legal, moral and ethical obligations of medical institutions and their staff to protect patients when such events occur.

Released: April 7, 2014


The American Association of Plastic Surgeons (AAPS) will give one of its two 2014 Academic Scholarship Awards to Amir Dorafshar, M.B.Ch.B., a  Johns Hopkins plastic and reconstructive surgeon who has helped pioneer facial transplants and rebuild the lives of adults and children disfigured by trauma and disease.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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