Skip Navigation
News and Publications
 
 
 
In This Section      
Print This Page

Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: September 30, 2014


Neuroimaging scientists at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Copenhagen are leading a team that received a $1.5 million grant from the Obama administration’s Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative to create a next-generation brain imaging system. They hope to help unlock the secrets of mental illnesses, including dementia, Parkinson's disease, depression and schizophrenia. The National Institutes of Health announced the award on Sept. 30.

Released: September 29, 2014

Maryland, Virginia and federal officials part of Washington, D.C.. event on Sept. 30


A team of Johns Hopkins disaster preparedness and response experts will provide disaster readiness training to local and national house of worship leaders at a one-day session in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 30

Released: September 23, 2014


Johns Hopkins Medicine is co-hosting an all-day symposium entitled “Prosthetists Meet Printers: Mainstreaming Open Source 3-D Printed Prosthetics for Underserved Populations.” The event includes workshops on such topics as strategy, techniques and policy regarding 3-D prosthetics.

Released: September 18, 2014


The inspirational and informative "Surviving Survivorship: Living with Cancer" conference, hosted by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center is free for cancer patients and caregivers.

Released: September 18, 2014

Funded initiatives include cutting-edge microscope that can image at molecular level


Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine alumnus Huntington “Skip” Sheldon, M.D., has committed $15 million to the school of medicine’s Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences (IBBS). Sheldon, who completed his medical education and residency at Johns Hopkins, went on to teach pathology at McGill University for 25 years. He is a longtime benefactor of the university who has served as a trustee for more than two decades.

Released: September 18, 2014


Johns Hopkins Children’s Center pediatrician Myron Yaster, M.D., has been chosen to receive the first-ever Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia. Yaster is being honored for his trailblazing work in the field of pediatric anesthesia and pain management.

Released: September 17, 2014


In an analysis of genetic information among more than 87,000 men, a global team of scientists says it has found 23 new genetic variants common differences in the genetic code  that increase a man’s risk for prostate cancer. The so-called meta-analysis, believed to be the largest of its kind, has revealed once hidden mutations among men in a broad array of ethnic groups comprising men of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry.

Released: September 17, 2014


Two Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have discovered the “molecular brakes” that time the generation of important cells in the inner ear cochleas of mice. These “hair cells” translate sound waves into electrical signals that are carried to the brain and are interpreted as sounds. If the arrangement of the cells is disordered, hearing is impaired.

Released: September 16, 2014

Technique will likely have applications in forensic science and donor organ monitoring


Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified a highly sensitive means of analyzing very tiny amounts of DNA. The discovery, they say, could increase the ability of forensic scientists to match genetic material in some criminal investigations. It could also prevent the need for a painful, invasive test given to transplant patients at risk of rejecting their donor organs and replace it with a blood test that reveals traces of donor DNA.

Released: September 16, 2014


Using a pain clinic as a testing ground, researchers at Johns Hopkins have shown that a management process first popularized by Toyota in Japan can substantially reduce patient wait times and possibly improve the teaching of interns and residents.

Released: September 15, 2014

Lisa Allen to lead service excellence and patient satisfaction efforts across the academic health care delivery system


Patient service and quality improvement expert Lisa Allen has been named the first chief patient experience officer for Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Released: September 15, 2014


The timing of a toddler’s first steps is an important developmental milestone, but a slight delay in walking is typically not a cause of concern by itself.

Released: September 11, 2014


The Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center is the recipient of one of 22 research grants offered to investigators in nine countries by the International Progressive MS Alliance, a worldwide collaborative focused on finding solutions to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Released: September 11, 2014

More research is still needed to test the role of psilocybin in helping people quit


 Johns Hopkins researchers report that a small number of longtime smokers who had failed many attempts to drop the habit did so after a carefully controlled and monitored use of psilocybin, the active hallucinogenic agent in so-called "magic mushrooms,” in the context of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment program.

Released: September 10, 2014


The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has been named a top medical education program, along with the University of California, San Francisco, by the physician network Doximity and its partner U.S. News & World Report. This is their first comprehensive national study of residency programs. Johns Hopkins placed in the top 10 in 14 specialties and is number one in four specialties: Nuclear Medicine, Otolaryngology, Pathology (Anatomic & Clinical) and Surgery.

Released: September 10, 2014


Norm Barker, M.A., M.S., a professor of pathology and art as applied medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Lydia Gregg, M.A., an instructor and certified medical illustrator at the school, each received an Award of Excellence in the BioCommunications Association’s 2014 BioImages competition.

Released: September 9, 2014


A team of American infectious disease and critical care experts is alerting colleagues caring for Ebola patients that how they remove their personal protective gear can be just as crucial as wearing it to prevent exposure to the deadly virus.

Released: September 9, 2014

Seeks to close gender gap in reproductive health care


Compared with women, American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, research shows, a disparity fueled in part by the lack of standard clinical guidelines on the types and timing of exams, tests and treatments that should be offered to all men of reproductive age. 

Released: September 4, 2014


Prostate cancer patients whose tumors contain a shortened receptor called AR-V7 are less likely to respond to two widely used drugs for metastatic prostate cancer, according to results of a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins’ Kimmel Cancer Center and Brady Urological Institute. If large-scale studies validate the findings, the investigators say men with detectable blood levels of AR-V7 should avoid these two drugs and instead take other medicines to treat their prostate cancer. A report on the work is described online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Released: September 4, 2014


 Three Johns Hopkins Medicine hospitals have been awarded the 2014 Excellence Award for Quality Improvement in Hospitals from the Delmarva Foundation for Medical Care, an independent, nonprofit health care quality improvement organization. The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore and Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., each earned the distinction.

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer