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Girl Scout Troop to Donate Cookie Sales Money to Smile Train - 02/27/2007

Girl Scout Troop to Donate Cookie Sales Money to Smile Train

Media Advisory
Release Date: February 27, 2007

WHAT:  
Girl Scout Troop to Donate Cookie Sales Money to Smile Train

WHO:   
Junior Girl Scout Troop of Ellicott City, Md.
Ethylin Wang Jabs, M.D.
Director, Center for Craniofacial Development and Disorders, JHMI
Member, Medical Advisory Board, Smile Train

WHEN: 
4 p.m., Tuesday February 27
  
WHERE: 
Center for Craniofacial Development and Disorders
 Institute of Genetic Medicine 
 Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
 733 N. Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205

The Junior Girl Scout Troop of Ellicott City, Md., will visit and tour the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine at Hopkins to donate money they have raised through cookie sales over the last two years to fund a cleft-repair surgery sponsored by the Smile Train. Ethylin Wang Jabs, M.D., a member of the Smile Train medical advisory board and director of the Center for Craniofacial Development and Disorders at Hopkins, will accept the funds on behalf of the Smile Train. The Smile Train provides free cleft-related training for local doctors and medical professionals in developing countries and free cleft-repair surgery for millions of poor children.

Cleft lip and palate results from an incomplete formation of the upper lip or roof of the mouth (palate), leaving a hole or notch. Clefting is a common birth defect and may be surgically repaired. It can occur alone or as part of a genetic syndrome. Clefts affect millions of children in developing countries. When the cleft is left unrepaired, most of those afflicted cannot eat or speak properly.

The Center for Craniofacial Development and Disorders (CCDD) at Hopkins provides a comprehensive program in craniofacial research, education and clinical care. Multidisciplinary and collaborative, the CCDD conducts research to understand normal head and facial development as well as what goes wrong in the 700 inherited conditions with associated craniofacial malformations.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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