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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: May 29, 2015

Researchers caution that larger studies are needed to assess the potential for clinical use


In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors. Such drugs aim to disarm systems developed by cancer cells to evade detection and destruction by immune system cells. 

Released: May 27, 2015


Lightly stimulating the brain with electricity may improve short-term memory in people with schizophrenia, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Released: May 27, 2015


On Wednesday, May 27, Johns Hopkins Medicine announced that the United Way Charity Event, “Dancing with the Hopkins Stars,” held the previous night, raised more than $50,000 to support Maryland Unites, a United Way program that provides humanitarian relief and emergency support to nonprofits in Baltimore neighborhoods. 

Released: May 26, 2015


Johns Hopkins faculty and staff members show off their dance moves by competing in "Dancing with the Hopkins Stars" in support of United Way. 

Released: May 25, 2015


Reporting on their study with lab-grown human cells, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland say that blocking a second blood vessel growth protein, along with one that is already well-known, could offer a new way to treat and prevent a blinding eye disease caused by diabetes.

Released: May 20, 2015


Julie Lange, M.D., an associate professor of surgery, oncology and dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and John Fetting, M.D., an associate professor of oncology and medicine, have been inducted into the Miller-Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence.

Released: May 20, 2015


A novel two-drug combination has the potential to target and restore a defective protein underlying cystic fibrosis (CF), according to two phase III clinical trials conducted at 187 medical centers around the world, including Johns Hopkins.

Released: May 19, 2015


A distinguished group of 268 graduates will embark on their future careers as physicians and scientists at the convocation ceremony of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. A total of 113 M.D. degrees, 138 Ph.D. degrees, 15 master’s degrees and two postbaccalaureate certificates will be conferred.

Released: May 19, 2015


A multidisciplinary team led by Johns Hopkins researcher Venu Raman, Ph.D., with notable contributions from Guus Bol, Farhad Vesuna and Phuoc Tran of Johns Hopkins, has identified a new therapy for lung cancer, the most common cancer worldwide.

Released: May 19, 2015


Xinzhong Dong, Ph.D., a professor of neuroscience and neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has been named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator. Dong has been an HHMI early career scientist since 2009. The new, renewable five-year appointment will provide salary and benefits support for Dong, who will remain at Johns Hopkins, and members of his lab.
 
Released: May 19, 2015


Sending teen girls periodic text messages reminding them to follow through on their clinic appointments for periodic birth control injections can go a long way toward improving timing and adherence to contraception in an age group that is notoriously noncompliant, according to a small study from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

Released: May 18, 2015

Study of thousands of human bones reveals gradual decline as species grew more “domestic”


Modern lifestyles have famously made humans heavier, but, in one particular way, noticeably lighter weight than our hunter-gatherer ancestors: in the bones. Now a new study of the bones of hundreds of humans who lived during the past 33,000 years in Europe finds the rise of agriculture and a corresponding fall in mobility drove the change, rather than urbanization, nutrition or other factors.

Released: May 18, 2015

Site aims to help consumers decipher the institution’s performance scores and make better-informed health care decisions


Released: May 15, 2015

New building will accommodate more local startups


Released: May 14, 2015


A groundbreaking ceremony will be held for 1812 Ashland on Friday, May 15. The building will house Johns Hopkins offices, including FastForward East, a program designed to move academic findings and translational research into the commercial marketplace.

Released: May 14, 2015


Sahar Soleimanifard, a first-year medical student at The Johns Hopkins University, is among 30 graduate students receiving 2015 Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans.

Released: May 13, 2015


Johns Hopkins Medicine announced today the appointment of Robert A. Kasdin to the newly created role of senior vice president and chief operating officer. Kasdin comes to Johns Hopkins Medicine from Columbia University, where he has been senior executive vice president since 2002. He starts on July 1.

Released: May 13, 2015

Increasingly common illness has high toll: 300,000 stricken, $1.3 billion in treatment costs per year


Fundamental research into the causes and cures of post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome now has its first home base at a major U.S. medical research center with the launch of the Johns Hopkins Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center.

Released: May 13, 2015


The culmination of the DreamIt Health Baltimore accelerator program, a four-month intensive boot camp for health information technology entrepreneurs co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins, concludes on Wednesday, May 13, at DreamIt Health Demo Day. This one-day capstone event affords startup companies the opportunity to share their progress and plans for the future with an audience of industry leaders, possible investors and potential customers.

Released: May 13, 2015

Observational study does not prove cause and effect, researchers caution


 
In what they are calling a surprising finding in a large study of men who completed questionnaires and allowed scientists to review their medical records, Johns Hopkins researchers report that men with a history of asthma were less likely than those without it to develop lethal prostate cancer. 

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