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Current News Releases

Released: July 31, 2014

Mouse research could lead to better treatments for hearing loss


Researchers at Johns Hopkins have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view. Their imaging technique allows zooming in and out on views of brain activity within mice, and it enabled the team to watch brain cells light up as mice “called” to each other. The results, which represent a step toward better understanding how our own brains process language, appear online July 31 the journal Neuron.

Released: July 31, 2014


Physicians at Johns Hopkins have developed blood and saliva tests that help accurately predict recurrences of HPV-linked oral cancers in a substantial number of patients. The tests screen for DNA fragments of the human papillomavirus (HPV) shed from cancer cells lingering in the mouth or other parts of the body. A description of the development is published in the July 31 issue of JAMA Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.
Released: July 31, 2014


The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center has been awarded three Telly Awards for two educational videos on pediatric and pancreatic cancers.

Released: July 31, 2014


 Studies by vascular biologists at The Johns Hopkins Hospital could lead to new treatments for vascular disease. This work was led by Dan Berkowitz, M.B.B.Ch., and Lewis Romer, M.D., both professors of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The studies focus on the balance between (good) nitric oxide, and (bad) oxidants—both important regulators of the inner lining of blood vessels, called the endothelium.

Released: July 30, 2014

Alterations to a single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt


Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide.

Released: July 29, 2014

Designed to bring care closer to home, improve quality of care and better serve communities


ROCKVILLE, Md. — Kaiser Permanente and Johns Hopkins Medicine today announced plans to strengthen the successful collaboration between the two health care organizations. With the new agreement, Kaiser Permanente and Johns Hopkins Medicine will expand ways to deliver quality care by sharing evidence-based best practices, advancing population health programs, collaborating on education and research endeavors, and exploring how the organizations can work together to create better health care models for consumers and their communities.

Released: July 28, 2014

Allows cancer cells to divide even when oxygen-starved


Most cells do not divide unless there is enough oxygen present to support their offspring, but certain cancer cells and other cell types circumvent this rule. Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have now identified a mechanism that overrides the cells’ warning signals, enabling cancers to continue to divide even without a robust blood supply.

Released: July 25, 2014


The Sheikh Zayed Tower at The Johns Hopkins Hospital is home to a brand new, state-of-the-art computed tomography (CT) scanner, thanks to funding support from Toshiba. The Aquilion ONE ViSION Edition scanner will be used by the Division of Cardiology to scan patients’ hearts. Data collected from the scans, as well as a great deal of other data, will help fuel another joint venture between Johns Hopkins and Toshiba: the Toshiba Center for Big Data in Healthcare at Johns Hopkins.

Released: July 16, 2014

Suburban Ranks 15th Among All Maryland Hospitals


The annual U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings are in and Sibley Memorial Hospital and Suburban Hospital are ranked in the top tier among the 56 hospitals in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area, coming in at 11th and 13th, respectively.

Released: July 15, 2014

Process suggests a new type of immunotherapy


A team of researchers has devised a Pac-Man-style power pellet that gets normally mild-mannered cells to gobble up their undesirable neighbors. The development may point the way to therapies that enlist patients’ own cells to better fend off infection and even cancer, the researchers say.

Released: July 15, 2014


The Johns Hopkins Military and Veterans Health Institute announced its first-ever grant awardees on July 15. The pilot research grants will go to projects aiming to improve the health and health care of service members, veterans and their families. 

Released: July 15, 2014


David Valle, M.D., has been named the 2014 recipient of the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award from the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG). The award recognizes those whose professional achievements have fostered and enriched the development of human genetics as well as its assimilation into the broader context of science, medicine and health.

Released: July 15, 2014


Cancer’s no game, but researchers at Johns Hopkins are borrowing ideas from evolutionary game theory to learn how cells cooperate within a tumor to gather energy. Their experiments, they say, could identify the ideal time to disrupt metastatic cancer cell cooperation and make a tumor more vulnerable to anti-cancer drugs.

Released: July 15, 2014

Named the #1 hospital in Maryland and the only Maryland hospital to be nationally ranked in 15 medical specialties in the Best Hospitals 2014–15 report


The Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked in the top five in 10 specialties and #3 overall in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report ranking of U.S. hospitals. In the magazine’s ranking of hospitals at the state level, the hospital was named first in all specialties in Maryland and #1 in all specialties in Baltimore.

Released: July 15, 2014


Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study.

Released: July 11, 2014


Using spider toxins to study the proteins that let nerve cells send out electrical signals, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have stumbled upon a biological tactic that may offer a new way to protect crops from insect plagues in a safe and environmentally responsible way. 

Released: July 10, 2014

Solid leadership, IT and care coordination can mean success


Strong leadership, reliable health care coordination and first-rate information technology are key for academic medical centers seeking to establish successful accountable care organizations, according to a Johns Hopkins study published in the journal Academic Medicine this week.

Released: July 10, 2014

A medical first, the case yielded new insights into HIV behavior


The 4-year-old Mississippi child whose HIV infection was put in remission with pre-emptive anti-viral treatment shortly after birth has shown signs of viral recurrence, according to the team that has been following the patient since birth. That team includes Deborah Persaud, M.D., a pediatric HIV specialist at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, who performed the initial and all subsequent virological analyses on the case; Hannah Gay, M.D., a pediatrician at the University of Mississippi Medical Center who has been treating and following the child since birth; and immunologist Katherine Luzuriaga, M.D., of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, who conducted immunological monitoring of the child.

Released: July 8, 2014

More could benefit from lower complication rates linked to the procedures, new study shows


Hospitals across the country vary substantially in their use of minimally invasive surgery, even when evidence shows that for most patients, minimally invasive surgery is superior to open surgery, a new study shows. The finding represents a major disparity in the surgical care delivered at various hospitals, the study’s authors say, and identifies an area of medicine ripe for improvement.

Released: July 3, 2014

Telemedicine could improve access, reduce screening costs


Remote examination of eye scans can be nearly as effective as traditional eye exams in detecting premature newborns with a potentially blinding eye disorder, according to findings from a new federally funded study conducted by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and 12 other institutions.

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