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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: November 21, 2014

Implications for autoimmune disease, vaccine design


Immunity is a thankless job. Though the army of cells known as the immune system continuously keeps us safe from a barrage of viruses, bacteria and even precancerous cells, we mainly notice it when something goes wrong: “Why did I get the flu this year even though I got vaccinated?” “Why does innocent pollen turn me into a red-eyed, sniffling mess?”

Released: November 20, 2014

Fossils suggest ancestor of horses and rhinos originated on the Asian subcontinent while it was still an island


Working at the edge of a coal mine in India, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers and colleagues have filled in a major gap in science’s understanding of the evolution of a group of animals that includes horses and rhinos. That group likely originated on the subcontinent when it was still an island headed swiftly for collision with Asia, the researchers report Nov. 20 in the online journal Nature Communications.

Released: November 20, 2014

Evidence of heart muscle damage seen even among symptom-free people


Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road.

Released: November 19, 2014


When the mouse and human genomes were catalogued more than 10 years ago, an international team of researchers set out to understand and compare the “mission control centers” found throughout the large stretches of DNA flanking the genes. Their long-awaited report suggests why studies in mice cannot always be reproduced in humans. Importantly, the scientists say, their work also sheds light on the function of DNA’s regulatory regions, which are often to blame for common chronic human diseases.

Released: November 19, 2014


The following research findings were presented by Johns Hopkins cardiologists at the annual Scientific Sessions Meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago.

Released: November 17, 2014

Receptor reacts to specific light wavelength, a previously unknown discovery


A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine has discovered a receptor on blood vessels that causes the vessel to relax in response to light, making it potentially useful in treating vascular diseases. In addition, researchers discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which blood vessel function is regulated through light of a specific wavelength.

Released: November 17, 2014

Made possible by more than $5 million in gifts from Ujala and Wyncote Foundations


The Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE) at Johns Hopkins Medicine, with significant financial support from the Ujala Foundation and the Wyncote Foundation, has named eight new scholars to improve health care in India, with a particular focus on fighting tuberculosis.

Released: November 14, 2014


When choosing a cancer surgeon, patients are more likely to prefer surgeons with specialized training and lots of experience far more than those who practice in a convenient location or were recommended by a friend, according to results of a new survey reported in the November issue of the Annals of Surgical Oncology.

Released: November 14, 2014


Three Johns Hopkins Medicine hospitals are recipients of The Joint Commission’s 2013 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures award.

Released: November 13, 2014


Sickle cell trait (SCT), an inherited condition marked by having a single copy of the sickle cell gene but not the two copies needed to cause sickle cell disease (SCD), may raise the risk of chronic kidney disease, according to results of a large study led by researchers from Johns Hopkins, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Mississippi Medical Center, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington School of Public Health.

Released: November 13, 2014


New research in flies shows how cells in adult reproductive organs maintain their sexual identity. The study, published online on Nov. 13 in Developmental Cell, also identified a mutation that can switch the cells’ sexual identity. The findings could lead to new insights on how to alter cells for therapeutic purposes.

Released: November 13, 2014


A few days before open enrollment begins on the Maryland Health Connection website, one of the state’s premiere health care providers, Johns Hopkins Medicine, is voicing concern that its providers will not be available to individuals who select certain UnitedHealthcare products offered on the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange and other state exchanges.

Released: November 13, 2014


A urine-based test for early detection and monitoring of bladder cancer and a plan to develop nanoparticles to deliver chemotherapy drugs to bladder tissue are among the first round of projects awarded research grants by the Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute.

Released: November 10, 2014


Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and elsewhere have found that genetic differences may account for why zinc supplements are more beneficial to some people than to others for the prevention and control of diabetes

Released: November 10, 2014


Lisa Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities, has been named the 2014 recipient of the Herbert W. Nickens Award by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The award is given annually to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to promoting justice in medical education and health care.

Released: November 5, 2014

Researchers capture images of a protein complex that keeps hearts beating


For years, a multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers has tracked an elusive creature, a complex of proteins thought to be at fault in some cases of sudden cardiac death. As they report Nov. 5 in the online edition of Nature Communications, they have finally captured images of the complex. Those images reveal the connection between some genetic mutations and electrical abnormalities of the heart and provide a starting point for designing therapies.

Released: November 4, 2014

Fear of loss, combined with positive or negative incentives, influences performance


Recent research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that in high stakes situations, a person's performance depends on two factors: the framing of the incentive in terms of a loss or a gain, and their fear of loss.

Released: November 4, 2014

Researchers find promising therapeutic target for deadliest brain cancer


A multicenter team of researchers has identified an enzyme key to the survival and spread of glioblastoma cancer cells that is not present in healthy brain cells, making the enzyme a promising therapeutic target.

Released: November 4, 2014


The Ebola virus disease training modules for health care workers developed in collaboration between experts at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are now available.

Released: October 31, 2014


An evening of opera with special guest Marilyn Horne, iconic American opera singer, featuring performances by soprano Colleen Daly and tenor Rolando Sanz with direction and musical accompaniment by James Harp to benefit the Model Lyric Performing Arts Center and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. A multi-course menu with wine pairing will be prepared by Pazo, a Baltimore Harbor East southern Italian restaurant. Valet parking is included.

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