Skip Navigation
News and Publications
 
 
 
In This Section      
Print This Page

Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: July 29, 2014

Designed to bring care closer to home, improve quality of care and better serve communities


ROCKVILLE, Md. — Kaiser Permanente and Johns Hopkins Medicine today announced plans to strengthen the successful collaboration between the two health care organizations. With the new agreement, Kaiser Permanente and Johns Hopkins Medicine will expand ways to deliver quality care by sharing evidence-based best practices, advancing population health programs, collaborating on education and research endeavors, and exploring how the organizations can work together to create better health care models for consumers and their communities.

Released: July 28, 2014

Allows cancer cells to divide even when oxygen-starved


Most cells do not divide unless there is enough oxygen present to support their offspring, but certain cancer cells and other cell types circumvent this rule. Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have now identified a mechanism that overrides the cells’ warning signals, enabling cancers to continue to divide even without a robust blood supply.

Released: July 16, 2014

Suburban Ranks 15th Among All Maryland Hospitals


The annual U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings are in and Sibley Memorial Hospital and Suburban Hospital are ranked in the top tier among the 56 hospitals in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area, coming in at 11th and 13th, respectively.

Released: July 15, 2014

Process suggests a new type of immunotherapy


A team of researchers has devised a Pac-Man-style power pellet that gets normally mild-mannered cells to gobble up their undesirable neighbors. The development may point the way to therapies that enlist patients’ own cells to better fend off infection and even cancer, the researchers say.

Released: July 15, 2014


The Johns Hopkins Military and Veterans Health Institute announced its first-ever grant awardees on July 15. The pilot research grants will go to projects aiming to improve the health and health care of service members, veterans and their families. 

Released: July 15, 2014


David Valle, M.D., has been named the 2014 recipient of the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award from the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG). The award recognizes those whose professional achievements have fostered and enriched the development of human genetics as well as its assimilation into the broader context of science, medicine and health.

Released: July 15, 2014


Cancer’s no game, but researchers at Johns Hopkins are borrowing ideas from evolutionary game theory to learn how cells cooperate within a tumor to gather energy. Their experiments, they say, could identify the ideal time to disrupt metastatic cancer cell cooperation and make a tumor more vulnerable to anti-cancer drugs.

Released: July 15, 2014

Named the #1 hospital in Maryland and the only Maryland hospital to be nationally ranked in 15 medical specialties in the Best Hospitals 2014–15 report


The Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked in the top five in 10 specialties and #3 overall in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report ranking of U.S. hospitals. In the magazine’s ranking of hospitals at the state level, the hospital was named first in all specialties in Maryland and #1 in all specialties in Baltimore.

Released: July 11, 2014


Using spider toxins to study the proteins that let nerve cells send out electrical signals, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have stumbled upon a biological tactic that may offer a new way to protect crops from insect plagues in a safe and environmentally responsible way. 

Released: July 10, 2014

Solid leadership, IT and care coordination can mean success


Strong leadership, reliable health care coordination and first-rate information technology are key for academic medical centers seeking to establish successful accountable care organizations, according to a Johns Hopkins study published in the journal Academic Medicine this week.

Released: July 10, 2014

A medical first, the case yielded new insights into HIV behavior


The 4-year-old Mississippi child whose HIV infection was put in remission with pre-emptive anti-viral treatment shortly after birth has shown signs of viral recurrence, according to the team that has been following the patient since birth. That team includes Deborah Persaud, M.D., a pediatric HIV specialist at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, who performed the initial and all subsequent virological analyses on the case; Hannah Gay, M.D., a pediatrician at the University of Mississippi Medical Center who has been treating and following the child since birth; and immunologist Katherine Luzuriaga, M.D., of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, who conducted immunological monitoring of the child.

Released: July 8, 2014

More could benefit from lower complication rates linked to the procedures, new study shows


Hospitals across the country vary substantially in their use of minimally invasive surgery, even when evidence shows that for most patients, minimally invasive surgery is superior to open surgery, a new study shows. The finding represents a major disparity in the surgical care delivered at various hospitals, the study’s authors say, and identifies an area of medicine ripe for improvement.

Released: July 3, 2014

Telemedicine could improve access, reduce screening costs


Remote examination of eye scans can be nearly as effective as traditional eye exams in detecting premature newborns with a potentially blinding eye disorder, according to findings from a new federally funded study conducted by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and 12 other institutions.

Released: July 3, 2014

Gene’s absence influences connections between cells, researchers find


Johns Hopkins researchers have begun to connect the dots between a schizophrenia-linked genetic variation and its effect on the developing brain. As they report July 3 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, their experiments show that the loss of a particular gene alters the skeletons of developing brain cells, which in turn disrupts the orderly layers those cells would normally form.

Released: July 2, 2014

Although deaths are rare, 'weekend effect' raises questions about after-hours glitches


Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries, such as hernia repairs or appendix removals, on weekends are more likely to suffer complications and even die than children getting the same kind of treatment during the week, according to results of a Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study.

Released: July 2, 2014

White House honors Pamela Paulk for leadership working with ex-offenders


Johns Hopkins Medicine Senior Vice President for Human Resources Pamela Paulk was recognized at the White House on Monday as a Champion of Change for her work and advocacy in the hiring of ex-offenders.

Released: July 2, 2014


Investigators at Johns Hopkins are among researchers at 10 institutions selected to carry out a five-year, $30 million patient-centered study designed to compare strategies for preventing fall-related injuries in older adults.

Released: July 1, 2014

Find likely to aid drug development


Researchers at Johns Hopkins have spotted a strong family trait in two distant relatives: The channels that permit entry of sodium and calcium ions into cells turn out to share similar means for regulating ion intake, they say. Both types of channels are critical to life. Having the right concentrations of sodium and calcium ions in cells enables healthy brain communication, heart contraction and many other processes. The new evidence is likely to aid development of drugs for channel-linked diseases ranging from epilepsy to heart ailments to muscle weakness.

Released: June 30, 2014


Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center used two relatively simple tactics to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary blood tests to assess symptoms of heart attack and chest pain and to achieve a large decrease in patient charges.

Released: June 26, 2014


A Johns Hopkins-led research team has found that motivational interviewing, along with standard education and awareness programs, significantly reduced secondhand smoke exposure among children living in those households.

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer