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Historical Timeline

1968
The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Connecticut General Life insurance Company team up to create one of the first health maintenance organizations. The plan provides care to members who pay a monthly subscription fee.

1970
November 24: The groundbreaking for the new Columbia Medical Center takes place.

1971
Columbia Hospital & Clinics, 1971

1972
October 29: Nancy Guercio is hired in Medical Records at the Columbia Medical Plan. Nancy moved to the new hospital when it was opened and is still an HCGH employee today. She currently serves as a patient clerical assistant in the Emergency Department.

1973
May 1: Robert Simonsen is hired as a physician assistant in the Emergency Department. Robert is still an employee today, working in the Operating Room.
July 9: The Columbia Hospital and Clinics Foundation, Inc. opens its doors as a 59-bed, short-stay hospital. The total capital budget was $6.6 million for the first phase of construction. The architects were Tatar and Kelly, Inc. of Baltimore.
July 17: Columbia Hospital and Clinics Foundation is fully operational under the leadership of first administrator, William F. Towle. The hospital has 75,000 square feet, including: emergency facilities, a three-bed coronary unit, a ten-bassinet nursery, operating rooms and delivery suites, and 59 general patient beds – of which 33 were open immediately. The hospital initially serves anyone in need of emergency care, patients of Howard County physicians with staff appointments to the hospital and members of the Columbia Medical Plan.
July 20: The first baby, Sarah Ruth Phillips, is born in the new hospital at 11:11 p.m. weighing 6 pounds, 7.5 ounces to parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Wynn Phillips of Long Reach. (Howard County Times, July 26)
August 14: Joan Becker is hired and today, she is one of our longest tenured employees. Her first job at HCGH was a switchboard operator. She now serves as director of Telecommunications.
September 13: The Columbia Hospital and Clinics Foundation is officially dedicated.
While the new hospital focuses on caring for Columbia Medical Plan enrollees and Columbia residents, the rest of Howard County was still in need of an acute- care community hospital. So, within a year, the Columbia Hospital and Clinics Foundation reorganizes as Howard County General Hospital, a private, not for profit hospital governed by a 25-member board of trustees representing the community it serves.
September 27: First chief executive, William Towle steps down.

first baby
July 20, 1973 - Sarah Ruth Phillips is the first
baby born at HCGH.

Theodore A. Hussey (1930-2012), second chief executive, serves through 1979. A former Lieutenant Commander in the Navy, he taught at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and served on its planning committee before being appointed administrator of HCGH.

B. Harvey Minchew, M.D. becomes president of the medical staff.

1974
There are 88 physicians on staff at the hospital.

Columbia Hospital and Clinics Foundation changes ownership and control. The new board of trustees includes 17 members with 12 county residents. Board members include: Paul Willging, M.D., Chairman of the Board; Theodore Hussey, president of the corporation and administrator of the hospital; and John Payne, M.D., president of the medical staff.

Columbia Hospital and Clinics Foundation changes its name to Howard County General Hospital and becomes independent of Johns Hopkins. Patients with all types of insurance are able to be admitted.

In the first year, there are 2,000 admitted patients and 18,000 emergency room visits.

1975
Once Howard County begins providing inpatient care for all Howard County and surrounding communities, it isn’t long before expanded services and more patient beds are needed. In 1975, the hospital applies to the Maryland Comprehensive Health Planning Agency asking to construct a 120-bed addition. The request is approved in December, construction begins in 1976, and the addition opens in 1977.

Trustees include:  Carl Segal, M.D.;, Ronald H. Carlson; John Hamilton, M.D.; Paul Stolley M.D.; Gary Belcher, M.D.; Jerome Hantman, M.D.; Charles Lancelotta, M.D.; and George Hurwitz.  John Payne, M.D., is president of the medical staff; Doris Thompson is Board Chair.

1976
Nov 25: New England Journal of Medicine prints “The Johns Hopkins Experience in Howard County” by Henry M. Seidel, M.D.

Carl Segal, M.D. serves as president of the medical staff.

The Howard County General Hospital Capital Fund, Inc. the predecessor of the Howard Hospital Foundation, is established and raises $1.7 million of the $8.8 million needed for the 120-bed addition to the hospital.

1977
Work begins on a two-story, multi-specialty medical office building on hospital property, known as the Medical Arts Building.

Ronald Carlson serves as Chairman of the Board of Trustees.

W. Haddox Sothoron, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

1978
Maryland Health Resources Planning Commission turns down a Lutheran Hospital proposal to build a second hospital in the county, effectively granting HCGH status as the sole Howard County hospital.

January: HCGH opens a 56-bed satellite acute care facility on the  third floor of Lorien Nursing home to serve as an interim expansion to ensure hospital capacity continues to meet community needs.

Nurses vote to unionize.

Theodore Hussey steps down as chief executive of the hospital.

Webster
The late Phillip Webster, M.D., HCGH pediatrician
with a newborn.

New administrator, Donald J. Jacobs, leads the hospital.

H. Vaughn Belcher, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

1979
Walter Terry serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Thomas MacLean, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

1980
There are 17,819 Emergency Room visits and a total of 3,968 surgeries performed at the hospital.

August: The North Wing expansion opens adding 120 beds at a cost of $5.25 million. The expansion includes improved Labor and Delivery rooms, a pharmacy and dietary services. This expansion also adds a 12-bed Critical Care Unit and a 21 bed step-down Intermediate Care Unit. The newborn nursery is expanded from ten to 21 beds and the entire third floor of the hospital is dedicated to the treatment of maternity and gynecology patients.
September 6: The Physician’s Annual Dinner Dance is established.

Hantman
Jerome Hantman, M.D.

Jerome Hantman, M.D. serves as president of the medical staff. He is a cardiologist with Cardiovascular Specialists of Central Maryland, and was the first cardiologist on staff at HCGH.

Don J. Jacobs is selected by the search committee to become the new president of HCGH.

1981
April: An eight-bed pediatric cluster opens on the second floor of the new North Wing.

June Roper serves as the chairwoman of the Board of Trustees.

Eugene Willis, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

1982
William Mayer, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

There are 22,000 Emergency Room visits, 1,700 Babies delivered, 5,000 Operations, 300 physicians on staff, and 500 full-time employees.

1983
July: Completion of the Health Education Center provides space for staff in-service training and community health and education classes. The two-story building contains 6,400 square feet of conference and meeting space, including an auditorium on the main level. Located between the Medical Arts Building and the South Wing of the hospital, the facility is razed in 1994 to make room for the Ambulatory Care Center, now called the Health Care and Surgery Center.

Nurses begin working longer, twelve hour shifts, improving continuity of care for patients.

The Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program is initiated by Bernard Farrell, M.D., a pulmonologist with Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Associates, who still runs the program today. The program is the first of its kind in Maryland.

Alvin Eaton serves as the chairperson of the Board of Trustees.

William Flowers, M.D., serves as the president of the medical staff. Today, he is an internal medicine specialist with Maryland Primary Care Physicians.

1984
Marc Chaiken, M.D., serves as the president of the medical staff. Today, he is an obstetrics and gynecology specialist in private practice.

The hospital’s gross patient revenue exceeds $25 million for the first time.

1985
Benjamin Duggar, M.D., serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Jerry Seals, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

1986
Construction begins on the second building expansion to include an outpatient testing center with the latest diagnostic equipment.

William Parnes, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

April 18: The cutover to our first telephone switch (SL-1) occurs. HCGH goes from three-digit extensions to four digits with direct dialing. The hospital’s main telephone number changes from 740-7500 to 740-7890. Area codes were not needed at that time. Patients no longer share a “party” line and have access to direct dial.

The “Building Fund” Capital Campaign for the South Wing raises approximately $2.4 million to support the completion of the $28 million project. This was the first employee fund raising campaign. Our employees continue their generous support of the hospital today.

1987
Henry Miller, Ph.D., serves as chairperson for the Board of Trustees.

Jerry Levine, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an internal medicine specialist with Maryland Primary Care Physicians.

Howard Health System (HHS) is created as a parent company to HCGH to plan and coordinate hospital and health services for residents of Howard County. Howard County Health Services, Inc. (HSI), a for-profit subsidiary of HHS, is established to develop health care ventures to further the mission of HCGH. Over its lifetime, numerous ventures are established; many in cooperation with other local health care providers, such as diagnostic imaging services, a sleep disorders service, emergency physician service and ambulatory blood gas laboratory, among others.

Groundbreaking
VIPs at groundbreaking of South Wing building project

1988
Bernard Farrell, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a pulmonologist with Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Associates, and continues to run the HCGH Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program.

October 28: The ribbon cutting for new South Wing takes place. The $28 million construction and renovation project provides 72 new medical/surgical beds, a new main entrance and a cafeteria with kitchen support facilities.

1989
The Capital Fund Board Endowment Committee establishes an endowment fund to support future hospital growth.

Cardiac Rehab
Cardiac Rehabilitation

James Moxley serves as chairperson of the Board of Trustees.

Alix C. Rey, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff.

The Cardiac Rehabilitation Program begins, led by David S. Jackson, M.D., a cardiologist with Maryland Primary Care Physicians, who still leads the program today.


1990
Victor A. Broccolino becomes president and CEO of HCGH.

A six-bed Special Care Nursery opens to provide care to high-risk infants by full-time neonatologists using high-tech equipment. The program serves to expand the hospital’s already large obstetrics program. The need quickly causes an expansion to a 12-bed unit. Tuvia (Gary) Blechman, M.D., joins the staff at HCGH and still heads what is now called the Lundy Family Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

NICU Founders
NICU Founders Tuvia Blechman, M.D. and Pauline
Sisone-Reyes, M.D.

HCGH staff care for 11,000 admitted patients, 27,000 Emergency Room patients and 2,500 newborns.

A surgical laser service is implemented. Although laser usage declines over time, in the 1990s, lasers are used in hundreds of surgical cases each year.

Steven F. Noskow, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a gynecologist with the Columbia Medical Practice.

1991
The first annual Benefit Golf Classic is held. Now in its 21st year, the event has raised nearly $1.2 million to help the hospital provide critical services.

Robert Makofski (1931-2012) serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Carol A. Parnes, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, she is a pediatrician with Parnes, May, McKay, Lee & Associates, M.D.

1992
The Capital Fund is renamed the Howard Hospital Foundation to better reflect the breadth of its fund raising mandate.

The Cell Saver Program is started using new technology to drastically reduce blood loss during surgery. This program eliminates exposure to diseases associated with banked blood and decreases the inventory of bank blood on a daily basis. With the OR staff operating the Cell Saver, cost of a contracted service is eliminated and responsiveness to needs is improved.

Kline A. Price Jr., M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an obstetrician and gynecologist in the area.

February: A 6,500 square foot addition is built to accommodate the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Center.

1993
The First Annual Symphony of Lights is held in Columbia. This family-friendly event has become a holiday tradition for local residents and attracts approximately 100,000 people each year, raising much-needed funds for the hospital.

David Abramson serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Paul Valove, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an obstetrician and gynecologist in the community.

1994
HCGH initiates one of the most advanced, freestanding regional oncology centers on the East Coast, bringing together in one facility sophisticated radiation and medical oncology services for the first time, at the Central Maryland Oncology Center. The center opens in the newly-acquired Sam Shoemaker Building and is a joint initiative between HCGH and the University of Maryland Medical Center.

Vic Broccolino
HCGH CEO, Vic Broccolino, 1994

Rave Reviews, a consignment shop benefiting the HCGH Auxiliary, opens in the Hickory Ridge Village Center. It closes in 2010.

A public kickoff of the 20th Anniversary Endowment Fund Campaign takes place, the first endowment campaign in the hospital’s history, raising $3.5 million.

The Special Care Nursery expands to 18 beds.

Gary A. Milles, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an internal medicine specialist with Internal Medicine and Wellness.

April: The HCGH Wellness Center holds its first free cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) Across Howard County class. A partnership with Howard County Fire and Rescue began in 1998, with an agreement to teach American Heart Association (AHA) courses of Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatrics Advanced Life Support (PALS) to fire and rescue personnel and the community. 2013 marks the 20th anniversary of CPR Across Howard County, resulting in 1,454 people being trained in the lifesaving techniques of CPR and choking. Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore discovered that cardiopulmonary resuscitation could prolong someone's life long enough to get them to a medical professional.

1995
March: Howard Endoscopy Center opens in the Medical Arts Building, the hospital’s freestanding endoscopy center, providing gastroenterological diagnostic services.
December: The Central Maryland Rehabilitation Center opens. A program of HCGH and the University of Maryland Medical System, the state-of-the-art facility, located on Woodside Court in Columbia, brings extensive outpatient rehabilitation services to individuals in Howard County. In addition to providing traditional therapeutic services, including physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech/language pathology, the Center offers special programs for the spine, sports medicine, hand therapy, treatment of communication and swallowing disorders, and treatment of pediatric developmental delay. Rehabilitation services return to the hospital in 2005 as a result of changes in insurance and payment incentives.

The electronic Meditech Hospital Information System is introduced. It is comprised of modules to support the management of clinical operations, such as pharmacy, radiology and laboratory, and business systems, such as accounting and human resources. Meditech provides an integrated IT platform
Jack Whiteside serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Adinarayana Divakaruni, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today he is a gastroenterologist with Digestive Disease Associates.

TCAS
The Ambulatory Care Center, 1996

1996
The Ambulatory Care Center opens – today this is known as the Health Care and Surgery Center. The freestanding, self-contained building houses The Center for Ambulatory Surgery, a state-of-the-art and multi-specialty outpatient surgical facility. It is developed to provide members of the Howard County community with accessible, cost-effective, high-quality, and innovative outpatient services. It consists of six operating rooms, one minor procedure room, a urology suite and a post anesthesia care unit. In addition, MRI and Cardiac Catheterization services are located on the first and second floor, respectively.

Charles J. Lancelotta, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is the section chief for neurosurgery at HCGH.

The Central Maryland Heart Center opens. The county's first cardiac catheterization laboratory is a joint venture between Johns Hopkins Medicine and HCGH. The Center offers state-of-the-art facilities for testing patients who may be suffering from heart disease using a procedure called cardiac catheterization.

The first annual signature event to raise funds for the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center (Then known as the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource and Image Center) is held.

November: HCGH, through a contract with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, initiates a maternal fetal medicine service at the hospital to care for women at high-risk during their pregnancies. Johns Hopkins physicians provide consultation services to local obstetricians and manage the Center for Maternal Fetal Medicine, a program that integrates care among multiple specialists to the benefit of mothers and babies.

1997
A comprehensive pediatric unit opens, providing emergency, observational and inpatient services for children ages 0-17. This is staffed by Johns Hopkins pediatric specialists. HCGH opens a pediatric unit at a time when most hospitals are closing them. The innovative model has been adopted by hospitals across the country.

A new member of the patient care team is introduced: the patient care technician (PCT), a multi-skilled assistive caregiver.

The Case Management Service is initiated.

Howard Home Health Corporation, a hospital-based home-health agency that serving Howard and Anne Arundel Counties, is established, providing a comprehensive range of nursing, therapy, home-health aid and other services. When HCGH becomes affiliated with Johns Hopkins in 1998, Howard Home Health discontinues services and Johns Hopkins Home Health begins providing these services.

The 13-bed Chest Pain Unit (now called the Observation Unit) is opened on the first floor of the hospital.

Alton Scavo serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Mary Hogan, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, she practices obstetrics and gynecology with Signature OB/Gyn, a community specialty practice of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

The 4 South nursing unit opens to serve oncology patients, offering hotel-like accommodations to its patients. In addition to private and semi-private rooms, the 29-bed unit houses two family suites for those patients whose families wish to stay with their loved ones while in the hospital.

1998
After a two-year planning period, the Board of Trustees votes to enter a strategic partnership to become a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine and the first community hospital in the Johns Hopkins Health System. The partnership is announced in March 1998 and the deal closed on July 1 of the same year. The Horizon Foundation is formed through the merger and capitalized with a $66 million gift from HCGH. Today, the Horizon Foundation donates more than $3 million annually to promote the health and wellness of Howard County residents.

HCGH holds its 25th Anniversary Gala.

Steven A. Geller, M.D. serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an internal medicine specialist with Centennial Medical Group.

The new Maternal Child Unit opens, featuring nearly all private rooms for new parents, a homelike décor and a comfortable, healing environment.

MCU
Maternal Child Unit patient room, 1998

The Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource and Image Center opens, providing free information and support for cancer patients, their families and caregivers; professional image consulting for cancer patients and other individuals; and cosmetic goods and services for purchase. Claudia Mayer, the wife of HCGH obstetrician and gynecologist William Mayer, M.D., was a beloved, local resident whose struggle with cancer inspired Tina Broccolino, Lynn Salisbury and others in the community to establish the center and provide this valuable service to the community.

1999
The Special Care Nursery is upgraded to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), with a designation of Level III, providing care for most high risk births.

Beverly Wilhide serves as chairwoman of the Board of Trustees.

Sam V. Sydney, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an orthopedic specialist with Orthopedic Associates of Central Maryland.

2000
The Howard Hospital Foundation launches its Master Facility Campaign, a four-year capital campaign to help fund the $34 million project of constructing a new Emergency Department, Intensive Care Unit and obstetrics facilities. HHF reaches its goal of $5 million six months ahead of schedule.

John C. Payne, M.D. serves as president of the medical staff. He is a retired anesthesiologist.

The First Annual Dazzle Dash is held as one of the kickoff events of the Symphony of Lights. The event sells out with over 2,500 walkers and runners taking part in the inaugural event.

2001
July: A new 16-bed Intensive Care Unit (ICU) opens as part of the hospital’s expansion and renovation. The 9,100 square foot unit, located on the hospital’s third floor, provides larger, more flexible space to accommodate advanced life support and monitoring technology for the hospital’s most critically ill patients.

The Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, an internationally-renowned eye institution specializing in the diagnosis and management of complex medical and surgical eye disease, opens a practice on the campus of HCGH.

John Isbister serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

William R. Kanter, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a plastic surgeon with Plastic Surgery Professionals.

2002
June: HCGH purchases a 10-acre tract of land from Howard Research and Development, a subsidiary of the Rouse Company, in anticipation of a growing demand for health care services in the county. The acquisition of the land, located between the current hospital campus and Howard Community College, increases the campus size by 50 percent. Seven years later, the Medical Pavilion at Howard County opens on the land.
July: An expanded, state-of-the-art Emergency Department opens. Triple the size of the former Emergency Department, services continue to be provided by Johns Hopkins Emergency Medicine physicians. The new facility is organized into three separate areas, each designed for a specific level of care: The Urgent Care Pod, Acute Care Pod and Pediatrics Pod.
September: The new Labor and Delivery and Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) open adjacent to the Maternal Child (Postpartum) unit (that opened in 1998), providing contiguous maternal child facilities in the West Wing of the hospital. At more than twice the size of the previous unit, HCGH's new Labor and Delivery unit features 12 labor, delivery and recovery suites, two cesarean section operating rooms and adjacent recovery rooms, and a perinatal suite to care for high risk obstetrical patients prior to delivery. The 25-bed NICU is designed to provide families maximum privacy.

The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services (MIEMSS) designates HCGH as a Level IIIB Perinatal Referral Center. The designation recognizes the comprehensive scope of obstetric services offered to high-risk mothers and babies, and opens the door for HCGH to accept more of these referrals from other Maryland hospitals.

Kiran J. Parikh, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a general surgeon with Maryland Surgeons.

2003
January: The Center for Breast Health opens, offering patients a comprehensive review of treatment options in a breast conference attended by medical and radiation oncologists, imaging specialists, surgeons and reconstructive surgeons.

The Center for Wound Healing opens to treat patients with non-healing and chronic wounds.

The renovation and expansion of the Diagnostic Imaging department is completed, bringing conclusion to the Master Facility Plan.

Intensivist medicine is introduced in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), providing round-the-clock coverage by intensivist physicians, who are trained in internal medicine with a sub-specialty in pulmonology and/or critical care. Physicians from Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Associates are engaged as the hospital’s first intensivists.

Bill Munn serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

David O. Nyanjom, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a pulmonologist with Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Associates.

HCGH “Serves more than 100,000 patients on its campus” (The Baltimore Sun, May 11, 2003) in its 30th year.

2004
January: The hospital receives approval to participate in the C-PORT registry, a large research trial comparing the outcomes of patients having a heart attack who are given various interventions including cardiac angioplasty. Through participation in the C-PORT registry, the hospital offers patients presenting with a heart attack the opportunity to receive life-saving cardiac angioplasty.

The hospital delivers 3,532 babies – the highest number of babies in a single year.

Outpatient Rehabilitation Services re-opens as a hospital-run service, which was previously run by an outside company.

Tuvia (Gary) Blechman, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is the director of the Lundy Family Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

2005
A “hospitalist program,” hospital-based physicians who care for patients while in the hospital, is introduced. This new approach to inpatient treatment provides around-the-clock in-house physicians who are trained in the management of problems commonly encountered by patients in a hospital setting.

Technology advances are made that improve patient care, including: electronic medication administration records, bedside medication verification, barcode scanning, and specimen label printing at the bedside. These measures help ensure that the right patient receives the right medication and dose at the right time.

Beverly White-Seals serves as chairwoman of the Board of Trustees.

Bernard Marquis, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an anesthesiologist with Howard County Anesthesia Associates.

2006
Hospital emergency room visits exceed 75,000 (hitting 76,283) for the first time and several years ahead of projected estimates.

MIEMSS designates our Emergency Department as EMS base station, meaning that we provide on-line medical direction to State Emergency Medical Services providers.

Michael G. Macon, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a general surgeon with Maryland Surgeons.

The Center for Maternal Fetal Medicine opens, staffed by Johns Hopkins specialists, expanding HCGH’s perinatal services and offering a team approach to patient care, involving perinatologists, neonatologists, pediatric subspecialists, genetic counselors and patient educators throughout the pregnancy. The center manages high-risk pregnancies with comprehensive care.

2007
The Campus Development Plan begins, a four-year project to provide the hospital with a brand new five-level Patient Pavilion that houses three inpatient floors with all private rooms, as well as space for outpatient services and support departments. Renovations are completed on 122,970 square feet of existing hospital space, including four inpatient units and new operating rooms and recovery rooms. The plan also includes a large employee parking garage, providing free covered parking for HCGH staff.

November: HCGH campus goes smoke free to protect the health of our patients and employees.

The Behavioral Health Unit opens in the Emergency Department, providing a separate, secure and comfortable treatment space for patients presenting with mental health conditions. The innovative treatment model is lauded by advocates for those suffering with mental illness.

Brian McGowan serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Michael E. Silverman, M.D., serves as the president of the medical staff. Today, he is a cardiologist with Cardiovascular Specialists of Central Maryland.

HHF launches the Campus Development Campaign to raise $30 million toward the $105 million project goal.

pavilion
Patient Pavilion construction, 2008

2008

April: HCGH is designated a Primary Stroke Center by the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). Advanced diagnostics and life-saving treatments improve care and outcomes for patients experiencing a stroke.
May 1: The Joint Academy opens, a new program for total joint replacement surgery, and a collaborative partnership between the patient, doctor and hospital that focuses on engaging and educating patients throughout the surgical process – from admission to discharge – so they can experience a quicker and more complete recovery.
August: The 542-space employee garage opens, with two elevators and two entrances, from Charter Drive and Cedar Lane.

Edward J. Lee, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a medical oncologist with Maryland Oncology Hematology.

MPHC
The Medical Pavilion at Howard County

2009
The Medical Pavilion at Howard County opens on the 10-acre site on the eastern edge of the hospital campus. A five-level 167,000 square foot structure, the building houses thirteen medical practices, including 90 physicians and dentists, the Johns Hopkins Laboratory, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Pharmacy, The Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center, Central Maryland Radiation Oncology, and the HCGH Wellness Center. A group of local physicians and the hospital partner on the construction and operation of the Medical Pavilion, a silver LEEDS-certified facility with a commitment to being environmentally friendly.

July: The new five-story Patient Pavilion opens adjacent to the hospital’s South Wing, with three new 30-bed, all private room inpatient units. The Bolduc Family Outpatient Center on the first level houses Physical and Occupational Therapy, Speech/Language Pathology, Cardiac and Pulmonary Outpatient Rehabilitation, Diabetes Management, The Center for Wound Healing, the Anticoagulation Unit, Outpatient Laboratory and facilities for diagnostic tests such as echocardiography, and electroencephalography support services, including enhanced external counterpulsation. The ground level provides much needed space for the Information Technology department and a new and substantially expanded Pharmacy Department.

Gym
Adult Rehabilitation Gym in The Bolduc Family
Outpatient Center

The entire third floor of the pavilion is dedicated to providing a continuum of care for the sickest patients, with an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), a Progressive Care Unit and a cardiac/telemetry unit. Intensivists, physicians who specialize in caring for critically ill hospitalized patients, are able to conveniently and efficiently follow the care of these patients as they move to the appropriate level of care during their recovery.

Chip Lundy serves as chairman of the Board of Trustees.

Marc B. Applestein, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is a urologist with Central Maryland Urology Associates.

Central Maryland Radiation Oncology, a partnership between Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center, opens in the Medical Pavilion. This new center provides advanced and comprehensive radiation therapy to people with all types and stages of cancer right on the campus of HCGH, offering the best of the academic centers close to home.

2010
Six renovated operating rooms open. The latest renovations to the main operating rooms significantly enhance the ability to perform complex, orthopedic and spine cases. High-definition imaging technology enhances the laparoscopic procedures with better visualization, producing better clinical outcomes. The enlarged surgical facilities provide for safer surgical procedures and improved workflow.

OR
Renovated operating room, 2010

Jonathan S. Fish, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, he is an internal medicine specialist with Charter Internal Medicine.

2011
The hospital exceeds $250 million of gross patient revenue for the first time.

Electronic medical record improvements include: Provider order management requirement, where doctors enter orders and progress notes directly into the electronic medical record system, providing better documentation for patient care. These advancements improve quality of care by reducing the chance of medication error, and ensuring more timely and accurate communication between caregivers.

The Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Unit opens. A specialized team of caregivers, including a geriatrician, geriatric nurse practitioner, pharmacist, social worker and therapists collaborate to care for elderly patients, with the goal of transitioning them out of the hospital and back home, while reducing the risk that they will need to be hospitalized again.

Evelyn Bolduc serves as chairwoman of the Board of Trustees.

Francis Chuidian, M.D., serves as the president of the medical staff. Today, he is a pulmonologist and critical care specialist with Johns Hopkins Community Physicians.

2012
The Breast Center at HCGH opens, under the leadership of Lisa K. Jacobs, M.D., a Johns Hopkins surgical oncologist.

Jacobs
Lisa K. Jacobs, M.D.

Surgical services experience a surge of growth, as demand for orthopedic surgery and other specialized surgery, such as pediatric general surgery, are available at HCGH. New staff and physicians, improved equipment and facilities give patients excellent care in a convenient setting.

Clarita G. Frazier, M.D., serves as president of the medical staff. Today, she is an anesthesiologist with Howard County Anesthesia Associates.

Edward Miller, M.D., Dean and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, who was instrumental in HCGH becoming part of Johns Hopkins Medicine, retires. Paul B. Rothman, M.D. is named the new Dean and CEO.

2013
Nicholas W. Koutrelakos, M.D., serves as the president of the medical staff. He is a medical oncologist with Maryland Oncology Hematology.

Vic Broccolino, long-time president and CEO of HCGH, announces his retirement.

 

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