In This Section      
 

Mission of Johns Hopkins Spiritual Care & Chaplaincy

Our Philosophy and Mission

Our Philosophy

The Department of Spiritual Care and Chaplaincy staff and volunteers, as part of a multi-disciplinary team, seek to provide excellent and effective care to all persons through every activity and service provided by this department.  The practice of effective chaplaincy, by its attention to the spiritual needs and resources of each individual, participates in the comforting and loving activity of God in order to promote the restoration of health and wholeness.

Hoofring & Mavund

The purpose of spiritual care and chaplain support is to enable you to utilize the spiritual resources of your faith and traditions as you seek healing.  Your faith may give you a foundation from which you can find order in the midst of chaos, hope in the midst of despair.

The provision of spiritual care services is ecumenical and interfaith and respectful of your religious and spiritual preferences as well as your right to accept or decline services. 

Our Spiritual Care and Chaplaincy Mission

  • To provide excellent and effective spiritual care and chaplaincy support which attends to the spiritual needs of the patients, their families, staff and personnel of The Johns Hopkins Hospital.
  • To provide opportunities for the discussion of the religious, spiritual and ethical dimensions of health care for clergy, health care professionals and interested laity.
  • To engage in partnership with the religious community of East Baltimore (and beyond) to promote health and wholeness.

William S. Perper Faith-Health Symposium

The Perper Foundation has generously provided funding over ten years for the William S. Perper Healthy Community Partnership National Symposium. The annual symposium honors William “Bill” Perper’s legacy to helping those less fortunate by engaging partnerships between hospitals and faith communities that have the potential to address many of today’s greatest health care challenges. 

Through a commitment to his faith community at the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in New York, Mr. Perper understood the power and engagement of clergy to improve health and chronic disease management in vulnerable populations nationwide. Building healthy communities through medical religious partnerships, was an area of interest for him, as he believed that people needed to become actively involved in their own health care and overall fitness for a better quality of life.  A series of annual symposia have been held in concert with Johns Hopkins Bayview faculty and staff, to which the community is invited.  Please check the webpage for symposium information.