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Training Grant Summaries

Training Grant Summaries

The following table contains the T32 Training Grants currently held by the School of Medicine. Click on a grant title to read a summary of that grant program.

Program Name

Funding Agency

PI Name

Expiration Date

# of Post-doc Slots

# of Pre-doc Slots

Basic Science Research in Digestive Diseases

NIDDK

Mark Donowitz

6/30/09

5

0

Basic Scientific Training Program

NIDDK

Steven Leach

6/30/11

3

0

Behavioral Research in Heart and Vascular Disease

NHLBI

David M. Levine

6/30/11

7

2

Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program

NIGMS

Carolyn Machamer

6/30/07

0

27

Biomedical Engineering Training Program

NIGMS

Raimond Winslow

6/30/10

0

11

Cardiovascular Systems Regulation Program

NHLBI

Artin A. Shoukas

8/31/10

3

0

Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Immune Inflammatory Reactions

NIAID

Mark Soloski

8/31/07

6

8

Clinical Pharmacology Training Program

NIGMS

Theresa Shapiro

6/30/08

8

0

Clinical Research and Epidemiology in Diabetes and Endocrinology

NIDDK

Christopher Saudek

11/30/07

3

2

Effect of Ethanol on Molecular and Cellular Pathology

NIAAA

Esteban Mezey

5/1/09

7

2

Johns Hopkins Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics

NIGMS

David Valle

6/30/07

0

12

Institutional Training for Pediatricians

NICHD

George Dover

6/30/08

4

0

Interdepartmental Training Program in Cellular & Molecular Endocrinology

NIDDK

Sally Radovick

6/30/07

2

0

Lab Research Training in Pediatric Oncology-Hematology

NCI

Curt Civin

5/31/08

10

0

The Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)

NIGMS

Robert Siliciano

6/30/10

0

49

Molecular Targets for Cancer Detection and Treatment

NCI

William Nelson

6/30/11

8

0

Multidisciplinary Training in Tuberculosis

NIAID

William Bishai

8/31/06

2

0

National Research Service Award

HRSA

Anne Duggan

6/30/08

4

0

Neuroscience Training Program

NIH

David Linden

6/30/10

0

5

Pediatric Pulmonology Fellowship Program

NHLBI

Pamela Zeitlin

6/30/08

5

0

Pharmacology Training

NIGMS

Ronald Schnaar

6/30/10

0

7

Research Training in Children & Adolescents with Major Mental Disorders

NIMH

Mark Riddle

6/30/09

3

0

Research Training in Gerontology & Geriatrics

NIA

Neal Fedarko

4/30/07

8

0

Research Training in Neuro-oncology for Neurosurgeons

NCI

Stuart Grossman

6/30/08

4

0

Research Training in Otolaryngology

NDI

Lloyd Minor

6/30/09

4

0

Research Training in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

NIAID

Robert A. Wood

8/31/09

3

0

Research Training in Pediatric Infectious Diseases

NIAID

Kwang-Sik  Kim

6/30/07

2

0

Research Training Program in Microbial Diseases

NIAID

Cynthia Sears

7/31/11

5

0

Training in Anti-Cancer Drug Development

NCI

Wade Gibson

6/30/08

5

6

Training Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine

NIGMS

Pierre Coulombe

6/30/10

0

12

Training Program in Hearing and Balance

NIH

Eric Young

3/31/10

4

3

Training Program in Neuroengineering

NIH

Nitish Thakor

3/31/09

0

10

The Visual Neuroscience Training Program

NEI

Ruben Adler

12/31/09

2

4



Project Title: Basic Science Research in Digestive Diseases
Grant Director: Mark Donowitz
Admin. Contact: Helen McCann 5-9675; (hmccann@jhmi.edu )
Agency: NIDDK
Expiration Date: 6/30/09
Number of slots: 5 Post-doctoral
Purpose: To prepare MD and PhD investigators for investigative careers in gastroenterology, emphasizing the areas of expertise of the Hopkins GI Division. Training includes basic science research in diarrheal diseases, ion transport proteins, IBD, collagen formation in the liver and intestine, proteomics, diseases of fat metabolism, cystic disease of the liver and pancreas, and matrix problems. In addition, formal training in clinical research can be pursued with the School of Hygiene and Public Health that leads to a PhD in clinical research. This training for a career in translational research includes study of cancers of the GI tract, genetic testing, and the role of diversity in disease.

Project Title: Basic Scientific Training Program
Grant Director: Steven Leach
Admin. Contact: Mary Mehl 4-4095; (mmehl1@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIDDK
Expiration Date: 6/30/11
Number of slots: 3 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The current rapid pace of scientific discovery, particularly at the cellular, genomic, and molecular levels, offers unprecedented opportunities for direct application of basic scientific findings to the problem of gastrointestinal disease. This progress will be optimized by providing rigorous training in basic scientific thought and technique to a select group of gastrointestinal surgeons who are already directed towards academic leadership. The Specific Aim of this program, now in its tenth year of existence, is to provide formal, basic scientific training to this select group of individuals as an integral component of their postgraduate clinical training.  One trainee per year is competitively selected from those entering the GI Surgery training program at Johns Hopkins.  During the first three years of postgraduate clinical training, this trainee is guided to choose a senior investigator/mentor from our list of participating faculty, all of whom have demonstrated an outstanding record of independent basic scientific achievement, as well as an established record of successful trainee mentorship.  The formal scientific training period begins after the third clinical year, and lasts for three consecutive years.  This training period is uninterrupted by clinical duties, and includes formal training in research ethics as well as other elective course work tailored to individual interests and capabilities.  All trainees are assigned an Individual Fellowship Committee charged with critiquing the trainee’s research, monitoring long-term progress towards an independent investigative career, and aiding in the selection of appropriate course work. The environment for training in basic gastrointestinal research is includes the graduate program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, in which selected trainees may be awarded a Ph.D. degree, as well as the NIDDK-funded Johns Hopkins Digestive Diseases Basic Research Develoment Center, and the NCI-funded Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center.  The specific recruitment of underrepresented minorities to this program is enhanced by the activities of the School of Medicine’s Office for Diversity, as well as a specific relationship between this training program and the Society of Black Academic Surgeons.  Trainees successfully completing the program continue to be mentored through the completion of their clinical training, and are frequently brought on as junior faculty with substantial protected time and additional research support. As a result, finishing trainees are highly competitive for mentored grant support (e.g. K08 or career development award). In this manner, the program is designed to generate a highly selected group of GI surgeon-scientists who will provide academic leadership for the 21st century.

Project Title: Behavioral Research in Heart and Vascular Disease
Grant Director: David M. Levine
Admin. Contact: Terry Panichello 5-8132; (tpanich@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NHLBI
Expiration Date: 6/30/11
Number of slots: 7 Post-doctoral; 2 Pre-doctoral
Purpose: The goal of this program is to recruit, educate and develop independent and creative investigators in behavioral aspects of heart and vascular diseases to help fulfill research manpower requirements in this important field of increasing clinical and public health importance.  The program recruits individuals both from the relevant health professions (e.g. Medicine, Public Health, Nursing) and complementary scientific disciplines (e.g. Behavioral Sciences, Health Education, Socio-cultural Sciences) to complement each other in multidisciplinary research. This goal is achieved via structural educational programs, emphasizing early trainee exposure to a variety of ongoing research and intensive mentoring and socialization by a multidisciplinary faculty committed to excellence in research training.

Project Title: Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program
Grant Director: Carolyn Machamer
Admin. Contact: Carol Liebenstein 5-3466; (clieben@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIGMS
Expiration Date: 6/30/07
Number of slots: 27 Pre-doctoral
Purpose: The Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Graduate Program (BCMB) has trained more than 460 scientists since 1979.  Serving as the major training program for seven Johns Hopkins School of Medicine departments, BCMB is an interdisciplinary program with 101 faculty members actively involved in research, teaching and mentoring.  BCMB’s objective is to provide trainees with a breadth of knowledge and understanding to ultimately prepare them for an independent and fruitful research career in the biomedical sciences.  An admissions committee screens all applicants and faculty members personally interview the top candidates. On average, 23 students per year matriculate in our program.  During the first three quarters of the first year, students take a single curriculum, which includes courses in molecular biology, genetics, macromolecular structure, biochemical and biophysical principles, cell structure, organic mechanisms, pathways and regulation and bioinformatics.  In parallel with these courses, the students participate in small group discussions, which cover original research papers directly relevant to the curriculum.  During the last quarter, the students select four electives, all of which have small numbers of students to stimulate didactics.  In addition, the students learn to write a fellowship proposal and complete research ethics training.  An essential component of their first year training involves the completion of three laboratory rotations and poster and oral presentations based on this work.  The first year training culminates with the selection of a thesis laboratory.  In subsequent years, the trainees complete advanced electives, attend journal clubs and seminars and focus on their thesis research.  The progress of each student is carefully monitored by the advisor and their thesis progress committee.  By the conclusion of their research program, the students are well versed in designing and executing experiments and critically evaluating the results.  Most students publish multiple research papers during their training.  The training concludes with the presentation of a public seminar and submission of a thesis.  Graduates hold research and leadership positions at all levels in academia, the government and industry.  The success of our students is fostered by an extraordinary level of collaboration and interaction among the faculty and trainees in the various laboratories.  Special emphasis is placed on applying conceptual breakthroughs in basic science to problems relevant to human health and disease.  As such our trainees have made important advances in areas ranging from neurodegenerative disease to diabetes, infectious diseases, mental retardation, pain management, cardiovascular disease, cancer and many others.


Project Title: Biomedical Engineering Training Program
Grant Director: Raimond L. Winslow
Admin. Contact: Hong Lan 516-5282; (hlan1@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIGMS
Expiration Date: 6/30/10
Number of slots: 11 Pre-doctoral
Purpose: Biomedical Engineering (BME) has emerged as one of the most exciting interdisciplinary research fields in modern science. Biomedical engineers apply modern approaches from the experimental life sciences in conjunction with theoretical and computational methods from the disciplines of engineering, mathematics and computational science to the solution of biomedical problems of fundamental importance. The Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program of the Johns Hopkins University is designed to train engineers to work at the cutting edge of this exciting discipline.

The cornerstone of the Program is our belief in the importance of in-depth training of students in both life sciences and modern engineering, mathematics and computer science and in the conduct of original research leading to the doctoral dissertation. In-depth training in life sciences is achieved in one of two ways. First, incoming PhD students may enroll in thefirst year basic sciences curriculum of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. This is a unique and intensive curriculum covering a broad range of topics including molecules and cells, human anatomy, immunology, physiology and neuroscience. Students choosing this option typically devote their entire first academic year to these courses. This curriculum is an excellent way to build a broad and solid foundation in the life sciences. Second, students may elect alternative life sciences curricula. These curricula have been carefully designed to provide training in areas of the life sciences that are appropriate to each of the program's research areas. This option is of particular value to students who enter the program having a strong background in the life sciences. In-depth training in engineering, mathematics and computer science is achieved through elective courses, with choice of electives reflecting the research interests of each student.

Detailed curricula have been developed in each of the program's research areas to assist students in making these choices.

Project Title:  Cardiovascular Systems Regulation Program

Grant Director: Artin A. Shoukas, Ph.D. 

Admin. Contact: Artin A. Shoukas, Ph.D 5-2872; (ashoukas@bme.jhu.edu )

Agency: NHLBI

Expiration Date:  8/31/2010

Number of slots:  3 Post-doctoral

Purpose:  Cardiovascular systems physiology is defined by its coherent viewpoint more than its cohesive subject matter--it is cardiovascular physiology studied from the viewpoint of systems science and engineering.  The systems viewpoint embodies the perspective of the physiologist, R.W. Gerard, "To keep in mind at all times the successive levels of organization which are inextricably linked in any physiological process and structure."  At each hierarchic level, we examine the interacting subsystems and determine a set of concepts suited to that level.  By analytically integrating the behavior of subsystems, we can understand and predict quantitatively physiologic functions at that hierarchic level.  Because the interaction between subsystems often

introduces new phenomena, the function of the whole system is often more than just "the sum of the parts."

For a comprehensive view of any physiological function, it is important to understand that function, not only at the micro level in order to comprehend the subsystem behaviors, but also at the macro level in order to see the functional implications of what is being studied.  Therefore,

problems are studied in different organs/tissues and at various hierarchic levels, from the cardiac and vascular muscle mechanisms to autonomic and hormonal regulation of the overall cardiovascular system.

Cardiovascular systems physiology is characterized more by its integrative point of view than by the hierarchic level of the system being studied.  Although it is sometimes associated with the organ level in the physiological hierarchy, the systems viewpoint can be effectively applied at

lower levels of physiological integration.  One of the hallmarks of the cardiovascular systems regulation program is the integrative nature of the training that our postdoctoral trainees receive. 


Project Title: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Immune Inflammatory Reactions
Grant Director: Mark Soloski
Admin. Contact: Angela James 5-2709; (ajames@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIAID
Expiration Date: 8/31/07
Number of slots: 8 Pre-doctoral; 6 Post-doctoral
Purpose: This Training Grant, now entering its 24th year, provides support for a unique interdisciplinary pre-doctoral and post-doctoral training program in Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  The Training Grant is the core source of extramural funding for the Graduate Program in Immunology. 

The mission of the Immunology Training Program is to provide outstanding pre- and post-doctoral training in the field of Immunology.  Our goal is to train the next generation of Immunologists who, through active scholarship in academic, industrial of government settings, contribute to the generation of new knowledge on the basic mechanisms of the immune system and the application of this knowledge to the understanding and treatment of disease. We seek to provide trainees with the ability to identify significant research questions in immunology, to find solutions to these questions, to think broadly and creatively about biological problems, and to communicate ideas effectively to others.  We accomplish this mission by selecting and supporting qualified trainees, providing relevant didactic coursework and through the participation of highly qualified faculty who are accomplished researchers in Immunology.

The faculty provide a broad range of training opportunities for students and fellows and reflecting strong institutional commitment to this area.  In recent years we have focused on developing important areas in immunology in which groups of faculty members with common interests could engage in complimentary and collaborative research projects.  These areas include innate immunity, allergy and asthma, viral immunology, antigen processing and presentation, autoimmunity, tumor immunology, and vaccine design.  In these areas, the training environment is enhanced by institutional strength in relevant areas of basic science and/or clinical medicine.  Cross-fertilization between basic research and clinical disease studies is an important aspect of the training environment.  The pre-doctoral program places emphasis on rigorous training in basic biochemistry and molecular and cellular biology in addition to immunology.  Progress of trainees throughout the didactic and research portions of the pre-doctoral training program is monitored closely through multiple mechanisms.  Post-doctoral fellows have the option of selecting laboratories that focus on basic immunology or immunologic diseases.  An extensive and successful program for recruiting minority students has been implemented.


Project Title: Clinical Pharmacology Training Program
Grant Director: Theresa Shapiro
Admin. Contact: Jeannette Fanning 443-287-5825; (jfannin@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIGMS
Expiration Date: 6/30/08
Number of slots: 8 Post-doctoral
Purpose: This is a new initiative to support MD postdoctoral fellows in a four year clinical pharmacology training program at Johns Hopkins. It is designed to address the widely-recognized shortage of rigorously trained physician scientists who conduct hands-on studies in humans, particularly in the area of clinical pharmacology. The program is centered in the Division of Clinical Pharmacology, a unit jointly under the Department of Medicine and the Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, in the School of Medicine. Recent leadership changes in both parent Departments and in the Division itself afford exciting new opportunities to formalize a training program that directly links molecular and clinical sciences. The proposed four year program includes a one year core curriculum in clinical pharmacology (coursework plus three research rotations) followed by three years of thesis research in the PHD-granting Graduate Training Program in Clinical Investigation. Thesis projects will include a molecular as well as a clinical component, a model used successfully with past and current trainees in the Division. Based on the collective expertise of the existing Division faculty, research is likely to focus on some aspect of anti-infective drugs, with a new emphasis on anti-parasitic agents. Each trainee will have a Primary' Mentor who will oversee the clinical aspects of the research project, complemented when appropriate by a Co-Mentor with expertise in basic science. The participating faculty includes not only those currently in the Division of Clinical Pharmacology but also a group chosen to reflect ongoing or foreseeable research collaborations and important teaching associations. The program will benefit from the advice and oversight of an Advisory Board comprised of distinguished clinician-scientists from within and outside of Johns Hopkins. Graduates from this program will have the skills and knowledge to undertake an independent career that features research in both basic and clinical pharmacology.


Project Title: Clinical Research and Epidemiology in Diabetes and Endocrinology
Grant Director: Christopher Saudek
Admin. Contact: John Reusing 5-2132
Agency: NIDDK
Expiration Date: 11/30/07
Number of slots: 2 Pre-doctoral; 3 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The program enrolls trainees in a full year of course work that includes the pursuit of a masters or doctoral degree in clinical investigation or epidemiology. Trainees are drawn from an established flow of outstanding fellows and students already in place within the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism and the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research.  After the year of course work, the training program offers an intensive research experience with faculty mentors who are established leaders or outstanding young prospects, in the disciplines of epidemiology or clinical research in diabetes and endocrinology.  Trainees have a wide variety of research areas from which to choose, given the breadth of professional skills and subspecialty expertise represented by faculty mentors.  The faculty mentors themselves benefit, since while they have been collaborating academically, this program will bring endocrinologists and epidemiologists into a closer, more structured, collaborative relationship. Finally, while the collaborating groups are large and active enough to have other training grants, the present proposal defines a unique set of collaborations and training activities that do not overlap with existing training grants.


Project Title: Effect of Ethanol on Molecular and Cellular Pathology
Grant Director: Esteban Mezey
Admin. Contact: Rita Rawlinson 4-0126; (rrawlins@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIAAA
Expiration Date: 5/1/09
Number of slots: 2 Pre-doctoral; 7 Post-doctoral
Purpose:  The research training objective is to provide a proper environment for the development of independent investigators in the field of alcoholism as it relates to molecular and cellular pathology.  Two post-doctoral fellows will work closely with a preceptor on a project related to the research of the preceptor.  The trainees will interact among themselves, with other preceptors in the program, and with the research community as a whole at the Institution.  Also, they can obtain formal instruction in biochemistry, biostatistics, and research methodology, and will be exposed to lectures and interaction with established investigators in the field of alcoholism.  The principal areas and significance of the research training offered are:  1. Hormonal regulation of the rat class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH).  This study identifies regulatory factors of rat class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cis-and trans-acting elements that mediate the effect of hormones and other factors on the ADH gene.  2. Mechanisms of liver fibrogenesis.  Investigation of factors that activate stellate cells to collagen producing myofibroblast-like cells and mechanisms whereby acetaldehyde stimulates fibrogenesis. Studies of compounds such as retinoids which suppress fibrogenesis 3. Studies of genetic susceptibility and mechanisms for intraepithelial neoplasia and for chronic pancreatitis.  4. Ethanol cytokine interaction in the regulation of liver regeneration. 5. Pathogenesis of steatohepatitis.  This work includes investigation of epidemiological factors, toxic factors, mitochondrial abnormalities and immunologic mechanisms.  6. Molecular and biochemical analysis of adenylyl cyclase in alcoholism.  7. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and alcoholism.  8. Studies of endogenous hypothalamic opioid activity in patients with positive or negative family history of alcoholism.  These areas of research will provide extensive training in different methods of biochemistry, molecular biology and cell culture.  Trainees will be exposed to the application of basic research to studies of patients with alcoholism.  The final objective is to instill in the trainee the ability to approach original questions of research relating to the pathogenesis of damaging effects of alcoholism on the body.

Project Title: Johns Hopkins Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics
Grant Director: David Valle
Admin. Contact: Sandy Muscelli 5-4260; (muscelli@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIGMS
Expiration Date: 6/30/07
Number of slots: 12 Pre-doctoral
Purpose: The Johns Hopkins Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics (JHHG) has grown steadily since its inception in 1980.  In response to the growth of human genetics and genomics, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine constituted the McKusick-Nathans Instititute of Genetic Medicine (IGM) in 1998, recruited Dr. Aravinda Chakravarti as the IGM director (2000) and set aside substantial space (~ 39,000 sq ft) for the IGM in the newly constructed (2004) Johns Hopkins Broadway Research Building (BRB).  As JHHG grows with the IGM, we continue to aim to provide our students with a strong foundation in human biology by exposure to a rigorous graduate education in genetics, molecular and cell biology and biochemistry plus a core of medical school courses selected to provide knowledge of human biology in health and disease.  Through seminars, laboratory rotations and thesis work, our students are also exposed to a wide variety of modern research technologies relevant to human genetics and learn the basic skills necessary to become an independent investigator.  The research activities of the 61 preceptors are diverse and include human and model organism genetics and genomics, developmental genetics, identification and analysis of genes responsible for human monogenic disorders, complex trait analysis, molecular cytogenetics, quantitative genetics, gene therapy, oncogenetics, stem cell genetics and studies of the ethical and societal consequences of the genetic revolution.  This broad spectrum of research activities in human genetics provides virtually unlimited opportunities for our students to work on projects appealing to their individual interests.  The ultimate goal of our program is to produce independent investigators who are well-versed in human biology in health and disease and in all aspects of human genetics and genomics.  We believe our students, equipped with this education, are well prepared to answer important basic science questions and translate this information into medical advances.  The success of our graduates, who obtain postdoctoral positions in top laboratories and go on to productive academic careers in top universities, strongly supports this conclusion.


Project Title:  Institutional Training for Pediatricians
Grant Director: George Dover
Admin. Contact: Becki Proctor 5-5039; (bproctor@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NICHD
Expiration Date: 6/30/08
Number of slots: 4 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The goal of this Institutional NRSA at Johns Hopkins University is to train pediatric residents and fellows to become junior faculty whose primary research interest is in the diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment of genetic and acquired disorders in children. The program recruits and trains individuals in the principles of modern basic and clinical genome sequence. A new challenge will be for pediatric researchers to address questions regarding multiple genes and the function of their encoded proteins. The researchers of the next generation will try to understand how multiple proteins function in pathways and how these pathways malfunction in human disease. These pathways often vary among individuals leading to a variety of human phenotypes. It is a goal to provide young academic pediatricians with the necessary training in molecular and cell biology and in genomic sciences and to translate this knowledge into therapeutic strategies to improve child health. The Center will tap into the experience of investigators both in clinical and basic science departments who are well versed in training young clinician scientists.


Project Title: Interdepartmental Training Program in Cellular & Molecular Endocrinology
Grant Director: Sally Radovick
Admin. Contact:  Kevin Koffenberger 4-2839; (kkoffenb@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIDDK
Expiration Date: 6/30/07
Number of slots: 2 Post-doctoral 
Purpose: The goal of the Interdepartmental Training Program in Cellular and Molecular Endocrinology at Johns Hopkins is to train physicians and postdoctoral fellows in biomedical science related to endocrinology and endocrine diseases.  The Program Director will work with a Steering Committee to choose candidates from two pools of highly talented individuals: 1) endocrine fellows at Johns Hopkins who have completed one year of clinical endocrine training, and 2) M.D. and Ph.D. applicants from this and other institutions who have a strong interest in endocrine investigation.  Selection will be based not only on an individual's qualifications and interests, but also on their potential and commitment to applying fundamental science to clinical problems. Graduates of this program become academic endocrinologists who function as independent laboratory or clinical scientists.

The training program consists of at least two years of intensive basic science laboratory work or clinical investigations under the direction of preceptors who carry out a broad range of endocrine-related research supported by a substantial base of NIH funding and are members of several University Departments. The training program features basic and clinical science integration and collaboration among investigators from diverse disciplines. There is a required core curriculum consisting of courses in research methodology, molecular biology, genetics and epidemiology and statistical analysis of research data.  Training mentors have NIH-funded research programs that can support the trainees investigational experience over a two year period.  In addition, there are seminars and conferences in endocrinological research as well as related disciplines.  These features are critical for mastery of research  in endocrinology.   An executive committee assists the director in running and evaluating the program.   In summary, the strengths of this research training program are collegial and successful mentors, an active general clinical research center, a committed executive committee, and a rich academic environment.


Project Title: Lab Research Training in Pediatric Oncology-Hematology
Grant Director: Curt Civin
Admin. Contact: Laura Domina (dominla@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NCI
Expiration Date: 5/31/08
Number of slots: 10 Post-doctoral
Purpose: This Pediatric Oncology-Hematology Lab Research Training Program provides interdisciplinary training to individuals who are preparing themselves for full-time careers in cancer research (10 slots/year). By participating in formal course work, research seminars, and individual research projects, trainees are expected to develop the knowledge base, critical ability and technical skills necessary to function successfully as independent investigators. Postdoctoral trainees who hold the MD and/or PhD degree are involved in closely-mentored research over a 2 - 3 year period. Outstanding opportunities exist in for training in cell and molecular biology, directly relevant to childhood cancer and blood diseases.

The training of physician-scientists is a major objective of this training program, which provides trainees with opportunities to study the molecular and cellular basis of human diseases, as well as to apply this knowledge toward more effective diagnosis and treatment. Physician trainees may spend 10% of their time on patient care which relates to their research objectives. However, all of the physicians enrolled in this training program devote their major efforts to their research laboratory training.

Project Title: The Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)
Grant Director: Robert Siliciano
Admin. Contact:  Sharon Welling (swellin1@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIGMS
Expiration Date: 6/30/10
Number of slots: 49 pre-doctoral 
Purpose: The Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, now in its 31st year, seeks to train MD-PhD students for positions of leadership in academic medicine and medical research.  Applications to the MSTP have increased steadily over the years to a record level of 574.  Interviews are extended to less than 15% of these students; applicants invited for interviews have outstanding academic records (mean GPA 3.9), excellent MCAT scores (average single test score 12.1), significant laboratory research experience, and high motivation for careers in biomedical research and clinical medicine.  Approximately 10-12 students enter the Program each year and on average 10 students receive MSTP awards.  The average length of study for the combined degrees is between 7-8 years.  There are currently 89 MD-PhD students in the Program; 57 have MSTP awards.  Four have individual NRSA awards and seven have their own private funding.  Enrollment of underrepresented minorities has increased to 25%.  Students generally take two years of preclinical science courses and then enroll in a graduate program for approximately four years.  During this time, students take advanced courses and select from a pool of over 500 potential mentors.  Mentors selected have well supported research programs ($1,500,000 average ADC) and substantial training experience (average of 15 prior trainees).  Students complete thesis research, publishing an average of 6.3 peer-reviewed papers, before returning to complete the remaining required clinical clerkships and electives in medical school.  The MSTP Director is a Johns Hopkins faculty member who is also an active investigator.  The Director heads a 33-member MD-PhD Committee that admits applicants and formulates policies for the Program.  The committee members also assist the Director in advising trainees and evaluating student progress.  The Program has been highly successful in fulfilling the goals initially set forth by the NIH.  Since the inception of the Johns Hopkins MSTP training grant, 249 MD-PhD students have graduated from the Program.  Of these, 182 had MSTP support; 171 have completed postgraduate training and have begun their careers.  Of these, 75% are in medical research positions.  This includes those in academic medicine (79%), those at research institutes such as the NIH (5%), and those in the pharmaceutical or biotech industries (8%).


Project Title: Molecular Targets for Cancer Detection and Treatment
Grant Director: William Nelson
Admin. Contact: Lisa Campbell 4-2444; (campbli@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NCI
Expiration Date: 6/30/11
Number of slots: 8 Post-doctoral
Purpose: This application seeks support for an interdisciplinary postdoctoral research training program which is designed to prepare clinicians for a full-time career in cancer research and education. Support for 8  postdoctoral research fellows is requested. This training grant which, for 21 of its 25 years, provided a broad training in cancer biology and therapy, is now focused on the studies of genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer with the ultimate goal to use these molecular changes, which are unique to cancer cells as new indicators for detection of cancer cells and specific targets for therapy.

The primary purpose of this training grant is to train the physician-scientist in basic and translational cancer research. This training grant is offered as two-year or more training program and has been a major support vehicle to provide an intensive research experience for physician trainees. The majority of the trainees enter this program via the Cancer Center Clinical Investigations Training Program but spend all but the first clinical year (which is funded from other resources) in full- time laboratory research. The program also supports a few selected applicants who apply to this training program (physicians and Ph.D.s) because they are interested in molecular changes and targets in specific fields of cancer research. Only the most qualified and outstanding applicants are selected for these few slots.

The training faculty who serve as mentors for individual trainees in this program are acknowledged leaders in their field. Examples include, but are not limited to, Drs. Volgestein and Kinzler (genetic changes in progression of cancer), Baylin and Herman (role of methylation in progression of cancer), Isaacs and Davidson (molecular biology of prostate and breast cancer) and Pardoll and Jaffe (novel approaches to cancer vaccines). In addition a close interaction between the faculty of this training program with other graduate and postgraduate training programs in basic science in the School of Medicine provides comprehensive exposure to basic aspects of cancer biology. As part of their training curriculum, trainees are required to complete two courses in the basic aspects of cancer biology and therapy, and actively participate in ongoing seminars, including a presentation of their research at Fellows Research Day. Mentors monitor the trainee=s research progress while continuously emphasizing ethical and responsible conduct of research. 


Project Title: Multidisciplinary Training in Tuberculosis
Grant Director: William Bishai
Admin. Contact: Sandra Schneider 2-2716; (sschnei1@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIAID
Expiration Date: 8/31/06
Number of slots: 2 Post-doctoral
Purpose: Tuberculosis is a reemerging disease, which after years of decline in the United States underwent an increase in incidence from 1985-1992.  Lack of public health infrastructure, funding, and a general complacency that tuberculosis was a disease of the past contributed to this resurgence in the United States and the continuing increasing incidence worldwide.  Among the many problems facing tuberculosis controllers is a lack of well-trained individuals.  There is a significant need for clinicians who understand in many variations of tuberculosis infection and disease, and for biologists trained in handling this unique pathogen under appropriate conditions of biological safety.

The proposal requests support for one clinical fellow and one postdoctoral research fellow for training in tuberculosis.  The resources of our university permit intensive clinical experience with U.S. patients treated for tuberculosis as well as clinical and research in human tuberculosis overseas in Brazil, Peru, and South Africa.  In addition, there is a significant research endeavor in the molecular pathogenesis, the pathology, the mechanisms of drug resistance, and the immunology of tuberculosis.  This proposal will provide multidisciplinary training both in clinical aspects and basic science investigation in tuberculosis.  Well-trained young investigators are essential for future tuberculosis control efforts.

Project Title: National Research Service Award
Grant Director: Anne Duggan
Admin. Contact: Linda Provenza 4-0912; (lproven1@jhmi.edu)
Agency: HRSA
Expiration Date: 6/30/08
Number of slots: 4 Post-doctoral
Purpose: Ongoing changes in the health care system and persistent racial and ethnic disparities in health status underscore the need for highly skilled primary care research faculty who can succeed in an academic environment. Junior faculty often find it difficult to develop the skills to build and sustain a primary care research career. A research-oriented fellowship can prepare individuals to meet this goal, to become active learners throughout their careers, to serve as mentors and collaborators for clinical and community faculty and, ultimately, to move into positions of leadership.

This two- to three-year training program is funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goals are t Attract highly qualified candidates who intend to build academic careers focusing on medically underserved populations and high risk groups; guide fellows in developing the skills needed to be independent primary care researchers and prepare them to compare successfully for the resources to develop as leaders in the field; introduce fellows to the techniques needed to be better teachers and to evaluate educational interventions; and guide fellows to secure faculty positions that will promote their continued growth as primary care researchers focused on improving the health of urban, underserved families. 

A team of research, teaching and career development mentors guides each fellow through a curriculum that integrates research and teaching training. Role modeling and experiential learning activities reinforce didactic instruction. The training program is based in the Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. It benefits from an interdisciplinary faculty and training activities carried out in collaboration with the University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health, the School of Medicine's Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program and primary care research fellowship programs in General Internal Medicine and the University of Maryland Department of Family Medicine fellowship program in primary care research.

Project Title: Neuroscience Training Program
Grant Director: David Linden
Admin. Contact: Rita Ragan 5-7947; (rgragan@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIH
Expiration Date: 6/30/10
Number of slots: 5 Pre-doctoral
Purpose: The Neuroscience Graduate Program, which was begun in 1983, has its headquarters in the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Consisting of 85 faculty drawn from various departments across the University, it serves as the hub of a broad spectrum of efforts for the training of graduate students, encompassing molecular, cellular, developmental, systems, cognitive and computational neuroscience as well as neurobiology of disease. Each year, from a pool of ~200 applicants, we typically matriculate 10-12 PhD candidates as well as 1-4 candidates for combined MD/PhD degrees (who are admitted through a separate process). Students enter the program with diverse undergraduate backgrounds ranging from computer science to biochemistry. In the first year they are required to take a year-long integrative lecture course with lab entitled “Neuroscience and Cognition” as well as a seminar on “Science, Ethics, and Society.” Research opportunities are presented to students through a Departmental Retreat, Lab Lunches (which feature work-in-progress) and a mini-symposium series by Program Faculty specifically designed to help first-year students choose their research rotations. This information is used to help pick three 12-week lab rotations which are typically completed by the end of the first academic year, following which, a thesis lab is selected. By the end of the second year, students complete 6 additional elective course, many of which are chosen from a list of 12 small seminar-style courses in Neuroscience specialties. Following completion of a Comprehensive Exam at the end of Year 2, students write and defend a Thesis Proposal which is written in the form of a Predoctoral NRSA. Each student is advised by two Prethesis Advisors in Years 1-2 (at 3 month intervals) and an individualized Thesis Advisory Committee thereafter (at 6 month intervals). Thesis Advisory Committees make reports to the Graduate Program Steering Committee which carefully tracks the progress of each student in the program as well as setting overall program policy. At present, 70 students are enrolled in the Neuroscience Graduate Program. The average time to complete the PhD has been 5.1 years. Of the students who have graduated from our program, 92% have remained in biomedical research and 85% have remained in academic biomedical research.


Project Title: Pediatric Pulmonology Fellowship Program
Grant Director: Pamela Zeitlin
Admin. Contact:  Jeff Ajello 5-1167; (jajello1@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NHLBI
Expiration Date: 6/30/08
Number of slots: 5 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The Pediatric Pulmonology Fellowship Program at Johns Hopkins is an ACGME-approved program and is funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute.   Applicants to our Fellowship Program may be individuals seeking combined clinical and research training in preparation for an academic career in pediatric pulmonary medicine.  These candidates choose to participate in the Clinical Science Training Program.  They possess an M.D. or M.D./Ph.D. degree and have successfully completed training in pediatrics in an accredited U.S. residency.  Applicants may also be individuals who are seeking research training for preparation for an academic career in medical research. These applicants choose to participate in the Research Training Program.  They possess an M.D., M.D./Ph.D., or Ph.D. degree.  During the first year of the Program, fellows participate in formal courses in biostatistics, and research methodology and the faculty assists the fellow in identifying and defining his/her research interests.  In the second and third years, the fellow is expected to complete his/her research project (s), submit a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal and submit grant applications that will start to fund his/her long-term research goals.

Research studies may be clinical, basic science or both.  Within the Division, there is active research involving cystic fibrosis, asthma, developmental and respiratory cell biology, epithelial transport, mucociliary clearance, lung injury models, pulmonary delivery of drugs, control of breathing and sleep disorders, and gene therapy.  Fellows in the program may also take advantage of special centers that are available through Division faculty.  These include a Cystic Fibrosis Care Research and Training Center, designated by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation as a Therapeutic Development Center, a Pediatric Sleep and Breathing Disorders Center, a Pediatric Lung Transplantation Program, a Swallowing Disorders Center, a Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy  Service and a complete Pulmonary Function Laboratory for children.  Our faculty also has established links with basic scientists and clinical investigators in Outcomes Research, Epidemiology and Behavioral Science.  A total of 34 faculty members from several different Divisions and Departments within Johns Hopkins University also participate in this training program. 

Project Title: Pharmacology Training
Grant Director: Ronald Schnaar
Admin. Contact: Mimi Guercio 5-7117; (mguercio@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIGMS
Expiration Date: 6/30/10
Number of slots: 7 Pre-doctoral 
Purpose: The NIGMS-funded Pharmacology Training Grant, administered by the Department of Pharmacology  and Molecular Sciences at Johns Hopkins, has been dedicated to recruiting and training research leaders at the intersection of chemistry, biology, and medicine. This goal is accomplished by rigorous courses in bioorganic chemistry, structural biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, bioinformatics, and pharmacology combined with laboratory training with leading researchers in the field. The program provides state-of-the-art cross-discipline and cross-departmental training from a diverse faculty which spans the chemistry-biology-medicine spectrum from analytical and synthetic chemistry to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. While providing a diversity of training opportunities, our program maintains a strong central focus on drug design, target identification and characterization, and drug action through group activities including seminars, research talks, and annual program retreats. The program has been successful in recruiting and training research leaders for industry and academia for over 25 years.

Project Title: Research Training in Children & Adolescents with Major Mental Disorders
Grant Director: Mark Riddle
Admin. Contact: Phillis Becker 5-2320; (pbecker@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIMH
Expiration Date: 6/30/09
Number of slots: 3 Post-doctoral 
Purpose: This is a 5-year competitive renewal of an institutional post-doctoral research training program in interventions research in children and adolescents with major mental disorders.  The program will serve to address the shortage of well-trained clinical researchers in this field.  The specific aims of the proposed program are to train clinical researchers in the following areas of interventions research with youth: efficacy studies evaluating new medication and/or psychosocial treatments; effectiveness studies of empirically supported treatments applied in diverse populations and settings; evaluation of safety and adverse effects of psychotropic medications, particularly during long-term treatment; and related areas of study as they pertain to interventions research—instrument development, functional neuroimaging, and outcomes assessment strategies.    The program faculty includes 6 primary mentors and 6 secondary mentors who have extensive experience in training and mentoring post-doctoral fellows and an established funded research portfolio.  The training program is located in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, with active collaborations elsewhere in the School of Medicine, the School of Public Health and the Kennedy Krieger Institute, an institution devoted to children with developmental disabilities.

The training program, which draws upon our experience over the past 4 years, will have 5 positions, and will include Ph.D.s (for 2 years of training) and M.D.s (for 3 years).  Recruitment of underrepresented minorities will be emphasized. Training consists of: 1) core coursework to ensure a basic understanding of the principles of research methods, design and statistics; 2) supervised clinical research in collaboration with a primary mentor, 3) an individual research project to generate pilot data for a successful career development award or other NIH grant application, 4) research seminars that involve study proposal reviews/critiques, didactics/formal presentations, and a journal club; and 5) attendance and presentations at national professional meetings.  The training will occur in a supportive environment of multidisciplinary researchers who are committed to research mentoring.

This training program is thoughtfully organized to produce a cadre of graduates who will become productive independent interventions researchers in child and adolescent major mental disorders.


Project Title: Research Training in Gerontology & Geriatrics
Grant Director: Neal Fedarko
Admin. Contact: Terry Choi 2-7811 (twon1@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIA
Expiration Date: 4/30/07
Number of slots: 8 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The primary objective of the Research Training Program in Gerontology and Geriatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is to educate and train qualified individuals with MD and/or PhD degrees to become independent investigators in geriatric medicine and gerontology. By the end of fellowship training, candidates are rigorously prepared for success in embarking on academic careers in biomedical and clinical research in aging within a geriatrics division of a university medical center. In order to train the next generation of independent scientists and clinical investigators who will be at the forefront of translational research on aging, the Division of Geriatric Medicine & Gerontology’s core curriculum includes formal didactics addressing (1) clinical study design and analysis (Epidemiology and Biostatistics); (2) the theoretical framework/molecular mechanisms underlying research on aging; and (3) the biology/physiology of aging in humans. To achieve the goals of the Research Training Program, fellows experience early and extensive involvement in laboratory and clinical research training under the tutelage of full-time faculty members at Johns Hopkins, often in collaboration with senior staff of the Gerontology Research Center (GRC), the major intramural research program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA). This mentored research experience includes structured meetings with Program Faculty and a supervised research project tailored to the trainee's interests and experiences and enables the successful trainee to produce one or more first-authored, peer-reviewed publications as well as a grant application to support further research.

Project Title: Research Training in Neuro-oncology for Neurosurgeons
Grant Director: Stuart Grossman
Admin. Contact: Joy Fisher 5-3657; (jfisher@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NCI
Expiration Date: 6/30/08
Number of slots: 4 Post-doctoral
Purpose:  The goal of the training grant entitled "Research Training in Neuro-Oncology for Neurosurgeons" is to prepare neurosurgeons for academic careers in neuro-oncology. Applicants with M.D. degrees who have completed at least two years of postdoctoral training toward board certification in neurosurgery and are committed to a career in academic neuro-oncology are candidates for this research fellowship. Applicants are solicited through announcements in journals, meetings and mailings, interviewed by members of the Steering Committee, and selected on the basis of merit. Each trainee is provided with a unique two or three year neuro-oncology research training program. Trainees are involved in well- supervised, multidisciplinary research activities in one of the twenty-two participating research laboratories involved in neuro- oncologic research. These laboratories are located in the Oncology Center (Biostatistics, Cancer Pain, Cell and Gene Therapy, EB Virus/CNS Lymphoma, Epidemiology, Molecular Genetics, Neuro- Oncology, Pharmacology/ Experimental Therapeutics, and Radiation Oncology), and the Departments of Radiology (Diagnostic Radiology Research, Neuro-radiology, and Nuclear Medicine), Neurology and Neurosurgery (Brain Injury and Brain Interstitial Chemotherapy, Neural Micro-vascular Function, Pain Research, Pediatric Neurology, Pediatric Neuro-surgery, and Neurovirology), and Pathology (Cytogenetics and Neuropathology). The trainees also attend clinical and research conferences, seminars, and courses throughout The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions that are relevant to neuro-oncology, their research activities, and their needs as future academicians.

Project Title: Research Training in Otolaryngology
Grant Director: Lloyd Minor
Admin. Contact: Brian Woodhead 5-3669; (bwoodhea@jhmi.edu )
Agency: NDI
Expiration Date: 6/30/09
Number of slots: 4 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The goal of our program is to train and to develop outstanding physician-scientists in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.  Our specialty requires multidisciplinary approaches for the understanding and treatment of communication disorders and diseases of the head and neck.  In order to meet this objective, our residents need to be educated in both clinical and research skills.  Research training is a key element to our training program because it serves as a means to enhance critical thinking skills, to strengthen the understanding of scientific and medical literature, to provide training in investigative techniques, and to develop the ability to pose testable hypotheses.

One outstanding feature of our current training program is that each year, two residents embark in our now-established 7-year track.  This track provides 2 years of continuous research training where research opportunities include, but are not limited to, topics in molecular biology of head and neck cancers, basic mechanisms of dizziness and balance, studies of the auditory nervous system, and clinical outcomes.  The strength of this training plan is measurable by the breadth and experience of the involved faculty.  The success of the training program is evident in the accomplishments of those otolaryngologists who have completed their training on this sequence and who are now building successful academic careers. 

Project Title: Research Training in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Grant Director: Robert A. Wood
Admin. Contact: Donna Dieterich 2-3855; (ddieteri@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIAID
Expiration Date: 8/31/09
Number of slots:  3 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The primary goal of the fellowship training program in the Division of Allergy and Immunology is to train pediatric allergist-immunologists for research careers in academic settings. The training program is funded by an NIH training grant and is accredited by the Board of Allergy and Immunology.  The philosophy of the training program is to foster the development of research skills while providing structured, supervised clinical activities so that, at the end of the three years, graduates are prepared both to develop an independent research program and to provide excellent patient care. Each fellow is paired with a faculty mentor with similar research interests so that each fellow’s research experience is unique, and designed to meet his/her needs and interests.

The goals of our program is designed to have three years in duration with a substantial focus on research, while still fulfilling all of the clinical and didactic requirements as put forth by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology to be certain that all Fellows will be able to get board certification.  To accomplish our goals, the program is structured to begin with an intensive year in research followed by an intensive clinical year.  The third year is then structured to focus on research and complete the clinical training requirements. 

Project Title: Research Training in Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Grant Director: Kwang-Sik Kim
Admin. Contact: Kevin Koffenberger 4-3917; (kkoffenb@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIAID
Expiration Date: 6/30/07
Number of slots:  2 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The goal of this program is to provide a strong research program in Pediatric Infectious Diseases for pediatricians and to produce outstanding physician-scientists equipped with strong research skills and knowledge in preparation for a successful academic career. Our training program is multidisciplinary, combining faculty and resources from multiple departments of the School of Medicine and the School of Public Health who share an interest in promoting biomedical research to young investigators. Postdoctoral fellows are trained in a single area in either basic or clinical investigation with ample exposure to many disciplines related to pediatric infectious diseases research. Twenty-two training faculty, 15 primarily in basic science investigation and 7 clinical investigators have been selected for the strength of their research programs, prior experience in training biomedical scientists, and the level of their extramural research support. Postdoctoral fellowship candidates will have completed a minimum of 3 years of residency training in Pediatrics. They will be selected based upon their commitment to an academic career and their interest in Infectious Diseases research. The trainees’ research training (approximately 80% time commitment) is supplemented with coursework, participation in relevant clinical and research conferences, training in preparation of manuscripts and grants and biomedical ethics. The Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases has had an outstanding track record of producing physician investigators who are committed to academic careers.

Project Title: Research Training Program in Microbial Diseases
Grant Director: Cynthia Sears
Admin. Contact: Rhea Martin 5-7351; (rcm@mail.jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIAID
Expiration Date: 7/31/11
Number of slots: 5 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The goal of the Research Training Program in Microbial Diseases is to produce outstanding independent biomedical investigators equipped with the expertise to address critical questions and unresolved issues in infectious diseases (ID) research.  A major strength of our program is its multidisciplinary nature, combining faculty and resources from multiple departments of the School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health who share an interest in ID research and have collaborated extensively over the past 5 years.  Post-doctoral fellows are trained intensively in a single area in clinical, translational or basic science investigation at a domestic or international training site with exposure to ID research in a variety of other disciplines.  Forty-one training faculty, 14 in basic science investigation and 27 clinical investigators, have been selected for the strength of their research programs, level of extramural research support, prior experience in training biomedical scientists and their potential for contributing to interactive research training.  The trainee’s research training is supplemented with coursework, participation in select conferences, training in grant preparation and biomedical ethics as well as research presentation skills including research seminars, and presentations at scientific meetings.  The current funding period supported the training of 15 fellows, 5 of whom remain in training.  Seven program graduates have full-time academic positions in ID and two are directing clinical investigation in industry ; one trainee is a clinician-educator.  Overall, these trainees secured 6 ‘K’ mentored new investigator awards. Fourteen of the 15 supported fellows have submitted or published a total of 92 manuscripts, reviews or chapters including 57 peer-reviewed publications based on the research training obtained under this T32 award. Since 1996, 34 of the 37 graduates (92%) of the ID research training program of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have academic appointments; 29 of these 34 are active ID investigators in University (N=24), government (N=2) or industry (N=3) positions. Five graduates are engaged in academic clinical practice. Approximately 70% of the graduates of the ID research training program since 1996 have been awarded independent research funds; the majority from NIH or other federal sources.  Given these data and successes, we request support for 8 post-doctoral training positions.  These grant funds provide a core of essential support for our ID research training program involving at least 10 M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D . fellows annually.

Project Title: Training in Anti-Cancer Drug Development
Grant Director: Wade Gibson
Admin. Contact: Mimi Guercio 5-7117; (mguercio@jhmi.edu )
Agency: NCI
Expiration Date: 6/30/08
Number of slots: 6 Pre-doctoral; 5 Post-doctoral
Purpose: This is a revised competitive renewal application requesting continued support for the Anti-Cancer Drug Development training grant, T32 CA09243, presently in its 25th year.  The training program is administered by the Department of Pharmacology & Molecular Sciences of the Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine and its objective is to prepare pre- and postdoctoral students for research and teaching careers in the area of cancer-related drug development. 

Predoctoral training provides highly qualified students with an integrated curriculum including both course work and research.  Rigorous core courses in the basic sciences are taken during the first year and include Molecular Biology, Biophysical Chemistry, Bio-organic Mechanisms, and Biochemistry and Cell Biology.  Students receive additional instruction and exposure to pharmacology and oncology through the required Graduate Pharmacology course taken in the second year, and through elective courses, seminars, and journal clubs.  Predoctoral trainees select a faculty preceptor and research project during their first two years, and devote most of their time after that to their thesis research and gaining experience with written and oral presentation of their work.  Postdoctoral trainees devote most of their time to research carried out more independently, but with appropriate guidance from faculty mentors, for periods of one to three years. 

The training program is interdisciplinary and brings together faculty from 7 departments:  Pharmacology & Molecular Sciences, Oncology, Biophysics & Biophysical Chemistry, Chemistry, Molecular Biology & Genetics, Urology, and Environmental Health Sciences.  Extensive faculty interaction is promoted by common research interests, seminars and journal clubs, and by student-related activities such as recruiting weekends, research retreats, student-faculty dinners, and teaching. 

Since its beginning in 1979, this training program has supported over 100 pre- and postdoctoral trainees, most of whom have gone on to careers in science and many of whom have assumed leadership roles in the field of cancer research.

Project Title: Training Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Grant Director: Pierre Coulombe
Admin. Contact: Colleen K. Graham 4-3640; (ckgraham@jhmi.edu )
Agency: NIGMS
Expiration Date: 6/30/10
Number of slots: 12 Pre-doctoral
Purpose: The Training Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine prepares scientists for laboratory research at the cellular and molecular level with a direct impact on the understanding, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of human diseases.  The Ph.D. graduates of the Program obtain rigorous training in basic scientific research and a thorough knowledge of human biology and human diseases.

Project Title: Training Program in Hearing and Balance
Grant Director: Eric Young
Admin. Contact: Anita Tilotta 5-3162; (tilotta@jhmi.edu)
Agency: NIH
Expiration Date: 3/31/10
Number of slots: 3 Pre-doctoral; 4 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The Training Program in Hearing and Balance provides research training to predoctoral and postdoctoral students in the Center for Hearing and Balance. Training areas include neurophysiology, human and animal behavior, theoretical and computational biology, neuroanatomy, molecular physiology, and cellular physiology. The training faculty consist of 16 faculty members from the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Neurology, and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The trainees will include three predoctoral students recruited from the graduate programs of Biomedical Engineering or Neuroscience, six (four positions were funded) postdoctoral fellows with appropriate doctoral degrees recruited directly to the program and appointed in one of the participating departments, and five summer/short-term trainees. The latter will be undergraduates or medical students and three of them will be interns in the Minority Summer Internship Program, a Medical School program for undergraduates from underrepresented minorities.

At all levels, training will focus on research, taking advantage of the excellent research facilities available in the Center. The program will also provide coursework including a year-long core course in Hearing and Balance (580.625-626 Structure and Function of the Auditory and Vestibular Systems, taught every other year) and specialty courses in molecular, cellular, and systems biology and in computation and theory. A special seminar will be provided for the summer trainees. Predoctoral trainees generally participate for up to five years, postdoctoral trainees for two to three years, and summer trainees for 10-12 weeks. Both pre and postdoctoral fellows are encouraged to write individual NRSA fellowships.

Project Title: Training Program in Neuroengineering
Grant Director: Nitish Thakor
Admin. Contact:  Allen Strong 5-3132; (astrong@jhu.edu)
Agency: NIH
Expiration Date: 3/31/09
Number of slots: 10 Pre-doctoral
Purpose:  For the first time at our institution, the Neuroengineering Training Program will focus on educational and research in the field of Neuroengineering. Neuroengineering is defined as the interdisciplinary field of engineering and computational approaches to problems in basic and clinical neurosciences. Education and research in Neuroengineering balance engineering, mathematics and computer science on one hand, and molecular, cellular, and systems neurosciences on the other hand. Our approach is to provide roughly one year of training in life sciences and one year of training in engineering and mathematical/computational sciences.

Since the Neuroengineering training program is uniquely spread across both the engineering and the medical schools, we have an additional opportunity to leverage the educational resources of both divisions. The students will derive their education in biological sciences from both the basic biomedical science programs and the medical school. The engineering education will have requirements for rigorous coursework in mathematics, computational neuroscience, and appropriate engineering subjects. 

Project Title: The Visual Neuroscience Training Program
Grant Director: Ruben Adler
Admin. Contact: Jane Cione 5-7589; (jane.cione@jhu.edu)
Agency: NEI
Expiration Date: 12/31/09
Number of slots: 4 Pre-doctoral; 2 Post-doctoral
Purpose: The Visual Neuroscience Training Program (VNTP) is supported by a training grant from the National Eye Institute, and represents a collaboration between the Wilmer Eye Institute and the Department of Neuroscience. Its purpose is to provide multidisciplinary training in visual neuroscience research by combining research opportunities and a specially designed didactic program. Disciplines represented among these faculty include molecular biology, cellular and developmental biology, immunology, cellular electrophysiology, experimental pathology, and visual psychophysics. The program supports both predoctoral and postdoctoral students. Predoctoral students will be eligible to enter the VNTP after they complete the first, introductory year of the PhD program in which they are enrolled.  In addition to their participation in the general activities of their respective PhD Program, VNTP students will be expected to do research in visual neurosciences under the supervision of one of the faculty members affiliated with the VNTP, and to select at least three visual neurosciences courses as part of their electives. A series of seminars on visual neurosciences by invited speakers are also offered as part of the VNTP.